Hospitality

  • September 21, 2021

    'Varsity Blues' Dad Invited Plotter To Versailles Bash, Jury Told

    A hedge fund founder facing charges in the first "Varsity Blues" trial invited the mastermind of the college admissions bribery plot to an extravagant birthday bash at the former home of the French monarchy, a Boston jury heard Tuesday as prosecutors sought to outline a quid-pro-quo relationship.

  • September 21, 2021

    No Physical Loss At NY Inn, Insurer Tells 2nd Circ.

    A New York federal judge correctly found that pandemic orders don't qualify a Catskill Mountains inn and restaurant for business-interruption coverage, Union Insurance Co. told the Second Circuit.

  • September 21, 2021

    Luckin Coffee Locks Down $187M Deal To End Investor Suit

    Luckin Coffee Inc. has signed a binding term sheet that will resolve U.S. investors' putative class action claims against the Chinese coffee chain as part of a $187.5 million global settlement.

  • September 21, 2021

    Calif. Tribe Drops Suit Over County's Casino Tax Plan

    The Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians and a California county have agreed to end their dispute in federal court over a contract the tribe said was unlawful because it created an unfair tax arrangement for its recently built casino.

  • September 21, 2021

    Cruise Line Quartet Request Quick Wins In Havana Dock Suits

    Carnival, MSC Cruises, Norwegian and Royal Caribbean jointly asked a Florida federal judge to quickly resolve lawsuits against each of them over a disputed Cuban port, arguing the claims "incredibly" come after former President Barack Obama encouraged travel to Cuba.

  • September 21, 2021

    Insurer Says Faulty Headset Caused Fire At Kansas Wendy's

    An insurance company has lodged a product liability and property damage suit against a California electronics maker in Kansas federal court, accusing it of manufacturing a defective headset that caused a fire and more than $1 million in damage at a Wendy's fast-food restaurant.

  • September 21, 2021

    Tenn. Judge Won't Let Johnny Cash Museum Exit Suit

    A Tennessee federal judge on Monday refused to allow the operator of the Johnny Cash Museum in Nashville to leave a suit it filed last year against a key investor, while sharply criticizing the operator for "negligent and unreasonable delay" in raising complaints.

  • September 21, 2021

    Hotelier Asks 7th Circ. To Revive COVID-19 Coverage Suit

    An Indianapolis hotel owner asked the Seventh Circuit to revive its COVID-19 coverage lawsuit against Fireman's Fund Insurance Co., arguing that the presence of the virus and the lack of a virus exclusion made its case different from the many pandemic cases decided against policyholders.

  • September 21, 2021

    Chicago's Rosebud Restaurants Lose Virus Coverage Suit

    Chicago-based Italian restaurant chain Rosebud failed to convince an Illinois federal judge that its COVID-19 business-interruption costs should be covered under its all-risk insurance policy.

  • September 21, 2021

    Tycoon Risks Being Ignored After No-Show At $3.5B Trial

    Lawyers for a wealthy Arab property tycoon have until Wednesday morning to explain their client's sudden illness and inability to testify at liquidators' $3.5 billion trial or his evidence may be excluded, a London judge said Tuesday.

  • September 20, 2021

    Uber Calls $91M Arbitration Association Fee A 'Ransom'

    Uber sued the American Arbitration Association in New York state court on Monday, saying the ride-hailing giant shouldn't have to pay a $91 million bill, which it calls a "ransom" coordinated by "politically-motivated lawyers" at the "opportunistic" law firm Consovoy McCarthy PLLC.

  • September 20, 2021

    Scientific Games Must Face Card Shuffler Antitrust Suit

    An Illinois federal court on Monday rejected a bid from Scientific Games Corp. to escape allegations that it used sham patent suits to corner the automatic card shuffling market after finding there was still insufficient evidence to conclude a rival should have filed suit sooner.

  • September 20, 2021

    FTC Inks $6.4M Settlement With 'Free' Cruise Robocallers

    Two executives and a group of Florida-based cruise vacation companies that made millions of illegal robocalls have reached a $6.4 million settlement with the Federal Trade Commission over their telemarketing operation that offered a purportedly "free" cruise by phoning consumers nationwide, the agency said Monday.

  • September 20, 2021

    USC Admin Felt 'Betrayed' By 'Varsity Blues' Ploy, Jury Hears

    A University of Southern California administrator told a Boston jury Monday she felt "truly betrayed" when she discovered that a co-worker in the athletics department and others had convinced her to sign off on admitting students to the elite school on the basis of fake sports credentials.

  • September 20, 2021

    Wardman Park Gets OK For $18M Marriott Deal In Ch. 11 Plan

    The century-old Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel got permission Monday from a Delaware bankruptcy judge to check out of Chapter 11 with the $18 million settlement of a long-running dispute with Marriott Hotels Services Management LLC.

  • September 20, 2021

    Yelp Can't Escape Investor Suit Over Local Biz Retention

    A California federal judge has denied Yelp's bid to toss a proposed class action claiming the crowdsourced online review website misled investors about its advertising program with local businesses, saying there's ample evidence the site made false or misleading statements about expected revenues.

  • September 17, 2021

    'Varsity Blues' Jury Hears USC Hoops Recruit Had JV Talent

    A student whose father allegedly bribed his daughter's way into the University of Southern California as a fake basketball recruit was in fact not even good enough to play on her high school's varsity team, jurors in the first "Varsity Blues" trial heard Friday.

  • September 17, 2021

    Baltimore Hotel Coerced 'No' Union Votes, NLRB Judge Says

    A Residence Inn by Marriott at the Johns Hopkins Medical Campus in Baltimore violated federal labor law by promising workers that if they voted against union representation, the company would resolve grievances and provide other benefits, a National Labor Relations Board judge has ruled.

  • September 17, 2021

    Ga. Judge To Travel Biz Atty: 'What The Heck Are You Doing?'

    Defense counsel for a Georgia travel booking business that, along with its president, is accused of underpaying a co-owner said he had no excuse Friday for his clients' failure to unearth financial documents, prompting a state court judge to ask the attorney, "What the heck are you doing?"

  • September 17, 2021

    Real Estate Rumors: Fairwinds, Halloween Adventure, Apex

    Fairwinds Credit Union has reportedly loaned $10.2 million for a Florida hotel project, Halloween Adventure's Manhattan location is reportedly for sale with an asking price of close to $16 million and Apex Capital is said to have paid $37.25 million for a Florida property where New York University's Grossman School of Medicine has space.

  • September 17, 2021

    Billionaire Loses Doc Bid In Casino Co.'s $297M Award Suit

    A magistrate judge denied two document requests by companies of Spanish-Filipino billionaire Enrique K. Razon Jr., ruling that he did not show how casino operator Global Gaming Philippines' documents would illustrate why enforcing the award violated U.S. public policy.

  • September 17, 2021

    Elevator Co. Says It's Owed $1.3M For JFK Airport Hotel Job

    Turner Construction Company owes more than $1.3 million to a subcontractor it hired to install escalators and elevators at the TWA Hotel adjacent to New York's John F. Kennedy Airport, the elevator company said in a state court complaint Thursday.

  • September 17, 2021

    Pa. Asks For Win Over Brewery's Claim For Closure Damages

    A Western Pennsylvania brewery owner can't seek monetary damages from the state over its pandemic closure orders and capacity restrictions because officials were acting in their official capacities to address a business sector with unique risks, the state told a Pennsylvania federal court Thursday.

  • September 17, 2021

    Policyholder Attys Decry Treatise's Impact On Pandemic Suits

    With billions of dollars at stake in coronavirus business-interruption suits across the country, policyholder attorneys are arguing that courts have erroneously relied on a prominent insurance treatise to find that businesses have not suffered covered "physical loss or damage" because of the pandemic.

  • September 16, 2021

    Strip Clubs' Bid For 2nd PPP Loans Hits Setback At 7th Circ.

    The Seventh Circuit dealt a blow Wednesday to a group of strip clubs that sued the federal government for access to the Paycheck Protection Program's second round of relief, staying a lower-court order that had opened the door to eligibility.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: AIG Counsel Talks SEC Risk Alert

    Author Photo

    As the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission responds to the changing landscape on environmental, social and corporate governance investing, including with its recent risk alert, it is imperative that the regulator take a measured approach, says Kate Fuentes at AIG.

  • What The Judiciary's Font Recommendations Can Teach Us

    Author Photo

    The D.C. Circuit's recent soft prohibition on Garamond and the ensuing debates about courts' font preferences should serve as a helpful reminder of a larger point — every departure from convention in legal writing carries some level of risk, says Spencer Short at Stradley Ronon.

  • US Franchisers Face New Compliance Hurdles In Australia

    Author Photo

    Recent changes to disclosure, dispute resolution and documentation processes in Australia’s franchising code require U.S. franchisers doing business Down Under to amend procedures that were already more restrictive than Federal Trade Commission directives, say Iain Irvine at Vardon Legal and Robert Smith at Akerman.

  • Best Practices For Compliance With NYC's New Vaccine Order

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Morgan Lewis lay out guidance for covered businesses to comply with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s new indoor vaccination executive order, explaining requirements for documentation, dispute resolution, reasonable accommodations and more as they relate to both employees and patrons.

  • How The 'Rocket Docket' Continues To Roar Through COVID

    Author Photo

    While the Eastern District of Virginia rocket docket is no longer the nation's fastest civil trial court, it continues to keep litigation moving efficiently, with pandemic protocols resulting in new benefits for litigants, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Wendy's Offers A Cautionary Tale On US Mediation Privilege

    Author Photo

    Richard Mason at MasonADR says an Ohio federal court's recent decision in Wendy's Shareholder Derivative Action reveals that the scope of the federal mediation privilege remains ill-defined, even when it is recognized, and offers four practice tips for crafting a well-defined mediation document.

  • Why A Missed Email Could Cost You Your Case

    Author Photo

    A recent Fifth Circuit ruling in Rollins v. Home Depot, denying a motion to amend summary judgment after the plaintiff’s lawyer missed a case notification email, aligns with precedent holding that simple errors can sabotage a case and even implicate ethics rules — but certain best practices can help avoid dire mistakes, say Amy Richardson and Charles Loeser at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Creative Commercial Lease Negotiations Can Help Revive NYC

    Author Photo

    New York City office building owners and retail and restaurant tenants must be ready to negotiate novel solutions in order to preserve business districts post-COVID-19, which will also help maintain the value of trillions of dollars of real assets and preserve the city's tax base, say Eric Menkes and Risa Letowsky at Duval & Stachenfeld.

  • Clayton Act Takeaways From Endeavor Execs' Live Nation Exit

    Author Photo

    The recent resignation of two Endeavor executives as directors of Live Nation Entertainment amid U.S. Department of Justice antitrust scrutiny underscores the thresholds, exemptions and violations that can arise under the Clayton Act's Section 8, as well as the need for robust compliance programs, says Francesca Pisano at Arnold & Porter.

  • 5 Reasons Lawyers Often Fail To Secure Litigation Funding

    Author Photo

    More than 95% of commercial litigation finance proposals are declined by funders because lawyers and their clients drastically underestimate the nuances of obtaining funding, but attorneys can overcome these challenges with informed and thoughtful preparation, says Charles Agee at Westfleet Advisors.

  • Despite Giuliani's Assertion, Lawyers Cannot 'Throw A Fake'

    Author Photo

    A new transcript reveals Rudy Giuliani telling federal agents in 2018 that it was permissible to "throw a fake" during a political campaign, but the notion that lawyers can commit acts of dishonesty without consequence as long as they do so outside their professional practice is belied by the rules of professional conduct and case law, says Hilary Gerzhoy at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Opinion

    It's Time To Upgrade Our Attorney Licensure Rules

    Author Photo

    The bar exam does a poor job of testing the skills employers expect from new lawyers, and those who pass the bar can practice indefinitely without independent oversight, so states should consider alternative means for assuring competence and personal stability for new as well as experienced lawyers, says David Friedman at Willamette University.

  • Data-Based Predictions On Case Timelines After Pandemic

    Author Photo

    Richard Finkelman and Karl Schliep at Berkeley Research Group analyze state and federal court data to pinpoint trends and predict changes in case resolution time frames after the COVID-19 pandemic upended judicial proceedings across the country, and they explain how parties can use these analytics to inform litigation decisions.

  • Roundup

    Embracing ESG

    Author Photo

    In this ongoing Expert Analysis series, in-house counsel share how they are adapting to the growing importance of environmental, social and corporate governance factors.

  • Retention Is Key To Meaningful Diversity At Law Firms

    Author Photo

    Minority attorneys leave their law firms earlier and at higher rates than their peers, so firms must deemphasize their diversity programs' focus on recruitment and rethink the ways they support and advance attorneys from underrepresented groups, say Shilpa Coorg and David Ramírez-Gálvez at DTO Law.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Hospitality archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!