Telecommunications

  • June 11, 2020

    FCC Strikes Back At Claims It's Stiffing Lifeline Carriers

    The Federal Communications Commission is clapping back against assertions that it pulled a "regulatory about-face" when it found that internet service providers can't be reimbursed for providing certain subsidized services if those services are not being used.

  • June 11, 2020

    Job Seekers Try Again In Amazon, T-Mobile Biased Ads Suit

    Older job seekers accusing Amazon and T-Mobile of discriminating against them by targeting Facebook job ads to younger users have taken another stab at making their case, attempting to shore up allegations that a California federal judge dismissed as "vague and conclusory" in March.

  • June 11, 2020

    NTIA Argues Ligado Overstates FCC's Spectrum Purview

    Trump administration officials are accusing Ligado Networks of overstating the Federal Communications Commission's authority over a spectrum band typically used for satellite transmission and of encouraging the FCC to steamroll other government branches seeking to pause a commission decision allowing the company to deploy a ground-based 5G network.

  • June 11, 2020

    Bryon Allen, Comcast Reach Settlement In Race Bias Suit

    A black-owned production studio whose discrimination suit against Comcast went to the U.S. Supreme Court reached a settlement with the cable company that includes a new content and distribution arrangement to resolve claims it would have carried its channels "but for" racial bias.

  • June 11, 2020

    FCC Denies Small Satellite Cos.' Delay Bid In C-Band Overhaul

    The FCC has denied a request by small satellite operators to hit the brakes on an auction of a wide swath of prized airwaves in the C-band while they fight the plan in the D.C. Circuit.

  • June 11, 2020

    6th Circ. Won't Revive Telecom Worker's Race Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit on Thursday declined to revive a former Michigan Bell worker's suit claiming he was mistreated because he is black and fired for complaining about discrimination, saying he failed to show he was treated differently than white employees.

  • June 11, 2020

    Republican Sen. Urges FTC Probe Into New TikTok Competitor

    Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., has called on the Federal Trade Commission to open an inquiry into a new app that closely resembles TikTok, suggesting it may not be abiding by children's online privacy rules and has "substantial" ties to the Chinese Communist Party. 

  • June 11, 2020

    Miss. City Ordered To Allow Verizon Cell Tower Plan

    City leaders in Jackson, Mississippi, must clear Verizon's plan to build a cellphone tower aimed at improving local service, a Mississippi federal judge has ruled, saying they failed to show substantial reasons why the project shouldn't be allowed.

  • June 11, 2020

    Deals Rumor Mill: Rackspace Technology, Airbnb, Hovis

    Cloud services provider Rackspace Technology could be valued at more than $10 billion in its planned initial public offering, Airbnb is still considering an IPO this year despite complications caused by the coronavirus pandemic, and bread-maker Hovis is up for grabs. Here, Law360 breaks down these and other deal rumors from the past week that you need to be aware of.

  • June 10, 2020

    Watchdog Group Asks Gov't To Rethink Facebook Purchases

    A public interest group has urged several government entities — including the Federal Trade Commission, the Justice Department, the House Judiciary Committee, and the New York attorney general — to consider whether Facebook's previous acquisitions were anti-competitive, with an eye toward bringing an antitrust case against the company in the U.S.

  • June 10, 2020

    4 Firms Vie For Lead Counsel In Zoom Shareholder Litigation

    Pomerantz LLP, The Rosen Law Firm PA, Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP and Faruqi & Faruqi LLP are competing to lead consolidated litigation brought by investors alleging video conferencing provider Zoom misled shareholders about the degree of its data privacy and security measures, according to motions filed in California federal court.

  • June 10, 2020

    FCC Pushed To Cut Off Telecoms Despite China Pressure

    The federal government's spectrum management branch lent support this week to the Federal Communications Commission's efforts to deny subsidies to Chinese equipment vendors that pose potential security risks, as Chinese carriers separately entreated the agency to continue their U.S. operations.

  • June 10, 2020

    Watchdog To Probe FCC's Lifeline Quality Control Measures

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office will audit the Federal Communications Commission's implementation of the automated Lifeline verification system after lawmakers raised concerns that the process, which is supposed to make it easier for Americans to access broadband and phone services, was not put into effect fast enough.

  • June 10, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Backs PTAB Ax Of Twilio Telecom Patents

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday upheld Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions that invalidated two Twilio Inc. patents covering telephone processing technology, ruling that the board properly analyzed prior art in finding the patents obvious.

  • June 10, 2020

    9th Circ. Says Snubbed CRT Buyers Can't Challenge Deals Yet

    Cathode ray tube buyers who were cut out of more than $500 million in price-fixing settlements must wait until those deals are finalized before they can take their challenge to the Ninth Circuit, the appellate court has ruled.

  • June 10, 2020

    Republican Sens. Urge FCC To Narrow Online Liability Shield

    Four GOP senators are pushing the Federal Communications Commission to closely scrutinize rules interpreting an online liability shield for web platforms, an action that agency Republicans have indicated openness to.

  • June 10, 2020

    AT&T Workers Ordered To Arbitrate GPS Tracking Suit

    A proposed class action against AT&T that accused the telecom carrier of using GPS systems in company vehicles to track its sales representatives' appointments and to illegally deduct money from workers' paychecks is being sent to arbitration.

  • June 10, 2020

    Maine Becomes A Hotbed Of Cable Law Spats

    Facing down four lawsuits — including two that reached the First Circuit — over new laws tightening the screws on the practices of cable and internet providers, the state of Maine finds itself embroiled in brawls over telecom issues ranging from customer billing to online privacy.

  • June 09, 2020

    Senate Slams Lack Of Oversight On Chinese Telecoms In U.S.

    The Senate Homeland Security Committee criticized the "little-to-no oversight" that Chinese state-owned telecom companies have received in the last two decades in a report released Tuesday, following efforts by the Trump administration to raise the alarm of the national security dangers of Chinese companies operating in the U.S.

  • June 09, 2020

    Apple, Samsung Sued Over 'Slide-To-Unlock' Patents In WDTX

    A small smartphone company has lodged patent lawsuits against Apple and Samsung over the "slide-to-unlock" feature in their devices, several years after the company's technology played a part in the tech giants' patent war.

  • June 09, 2020

    New FCC Subsidy Fund Contemplates Broadband Satellites

    The Federal Communications Commission on Tuesday moved forward with a framework to distribute up to $16 billion in rural broadband subsidies and left the door open for satellite broadband companies to qualify for the handouts.

  • June 09, 2020

    Privacy Org Presses 5th Circ. To Veto Border Phone Searches

    The Fourth Amendment shields travelers from having their phones and laptops rifled through during routine searches at the border, a civil rights group is telling the Fifth Circuit in defense of a Texas immigration attorney who is challenging the warrantless searches as unconstitutional.

  • June 09, 2020

    Movie Biz Blasts 'Radical' Maine Cable Bundling Law

    The film industry is urging the First Circuit to stamp out legislation in Maine compelling the cable industry to sell channel subscriptions a la carte, calling it a "radical and surprising mandate" that threatens to hurt copyright owners along with cable companies.

  • June 09, 2020

    Hawaii Telecom Wants $200M FCC Suit In Fed. Claims Court

    After being turned away by the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, a telecommunications company is asking the Federal Circuit to force that court to hear its $200 million case challenging a Federal Communications Commission decision to cut funding for a project in the Hawaiian homelands.

  • June 09, 2020

    Fed. Circ. Rejects Ex-Chief's Call To Clarify Alice In Dish Case

    Former Federal Circuit Chief Judge Paul Michel's call for his former court to clarify the Alice test went unheeded on Tuesday, as the full court denied two Customedia petitions he supported that sought review of decisions deeming two data storage patents abstract.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Breaking Up Big Tech Is Not Necessary For Accountability

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    Authorizing the Federal Trade Commission or a new digital authority to police dominant tech platforms pursuant to a new legal standard outside of antitrust can protect independent retailers, websites and app providers without the drastic measure of breaking up big tech, says Hal Singer of Econ One.

  • 3 Tips For Deposing Difficult Witnesses Remotely

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    Taking a deposition of an uncooperative witness is one task made immeasurably more difficult during the current pandemic, and certain deposition styles that may be extremely forceful in person may have limited effectiveness over videoconference, says Qian Julie Wang at Robins Kaplan.

  • 10 Ways In-House IP Counsel Can Get Ahead Amid Quarantine

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    With courthouses closed and some cases stayed or delayed during the pandemic, in-house intellectual property lawyers can take several productive steps to provide value and improve their companies' IP strategies, say Elizabeth Manno Banzhoff and Amanda Tessar at Perkins Coie.

  • Opinion

    New Jersey's Plan For 2020 Law Grads Is Brilliant

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    The New Jersey Supreme Court's much-needed order allowing this year's law school graduates to practice prior to being admitted should be adopted in New York — and developed further even after the pandemic ceases, says attorney Dmitriy Shakhnevich.

  • Age Bias Ruling May Usher Stronger Civil Rights Protections

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Age Discrimination in Employment Act opinion in Babb v. Wilkie, along with a related concurrence from Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in last month’s Comcast ruling, provides a framework for plaintiffs to hold discriminators accountable, even if they can’t prove a biased result, says R. Scott Oswald at The Employment Law Group.

  • 7th Circ.'s TCPA Ruling Could Weaken Do-Not-Call Exception

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    The Seventh Circuit's recent decision in U.S. v. DISH is a potentially major change in interpretation of how the transaction-based established business relationship exception operates under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act and other telemarketing laws, greatly limiting companies' ability to call former customers, says Ronald London at Davis Wright.

  • Managing E-Discovery Providers In Times Of Crisis

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    Retention of e-discovery providers usually involves considerable time and several layers of approval, but practicalities during the current emergency have proven that law firms must have the acuity to make smart but quick game-time decisions, says Shannon Capone Kirk at Ropes & Gray.

  • Witness Preparation Tips For Your Next Video Deposition

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    Just like in a normal deposition, remind your witness that testimony provided via videoconference may be used in a courtroom, so they must be mindful of everything they say or don’t say, the space they are in, and their attire, say Adam Bloomberg and Merrie Jo Pitera at Litigation Insights.

  • How 3rd Parties Can Best Limit Fraud Liability Amid COVID-19

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    COVID-19 enforcement activity raises the specter of liability for innocent third parties, but companies can take steps to reduce the risk of unwittingly facilitating fraud or price-gouging and demonstrate good-faith compliance to regulators, say Robyn Crowther and Ashwin Ram at Steptoe & Johnson.

  • Zoom Class Actions Highlight Calif. Privacy Law Issues

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    Zoom’s reaction to three recent consumer class actions is unlikely to settle the current litigation or dissuade additional allegations that the company's privacy policies and security vulnerabilities violate the California Consumer Privacy Act, says Tara Trifon at Locke Lord.

  • Rebuttal

    In Defense Of Virtual Mediation

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    A recent Law360 guest article highlighted reluctance among some in the legal community to embrace video mediation, but when assessing the concerns, it quickly becomes clear that the disinclination is not rooted in any firm rationale, says Michael Willemin at Wigdor.

  • Deciphering International Telemedicine Regulations

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    As global regulation strains to keep pace with growing telemedicine demands, clinicians who seek to practice remotely across borders encounter a blurry legal patchwork from country to country, say William Ferreira and Adilene Rosales at Hogan Lovells.

  • A Call To Action For The Coming Insurance Litigation Siege

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    Anticipating an onslaught of insurance litigation over coronavirus business interruption claims, G. Andrew Lundberg at Burford Capital paints a picture of what cooperation could look like among lawyers, courts, legislatures, regulators, insurers and policyholders dealing with this once-in-a-generation stress on the nation's judicial resources.

  • What's At Stake In High Court TCPA Case

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    The breadth of the First Amendment challenge in Barr v. American Association of Political Consultants, now at the U.S. Supreme Court, is striking and could dramatically narrow the scope of liability under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • How A Small Law Firm Adapts To Remote Work

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    Stay-at-home orders mean small firms like mine — six lawyers and 14 staff members — suddenly need to make rapid changes, but the initial shock has turned into excitement about this opportunity to improve old processes, says David Kwartler at Kwartler Manus.

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