Massachusetts

  • September 01, 2021

    Chancery Throws Out Challenge To $5.1B Tesaro Sale

    A Delaware Chancery Court vice chancellor tossed a lawsuit by a class of Tesaro investors over the allegedly underpriced $5.1 billion sale of the cancer drugmaker, ruling that the claims couldn't overcome Delaware corporate law precedent because she was convinced the deal had been legitimately approved by stockholders.

  • September 01, 2021

    Boston Absolved For Late Filing In Satanic Temple Suit

    A Massachusetts federal judge admonished attorneys for the city of Boston on Wednesday for blowing a deadline to respond to a Satanic religious group's lawsuit, but said the delay was not damning enough to end the case.

  • September 01, 2021

    Mass. AG Secures $27M Deal With Subprime Auto Lender

    Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey announced Wednesday that her office secured a $27 million settlement with national subprime auto lender Credit Acceptance Corp. over various allegations relating to the company's role in the origination, collection and securitization of subprime auto loans.

  • September 01, 2021

    6 Firms Jockey To Lead DraftKings Investors' Merger Row

    Pomerantz, Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd and four other firms are competing for the lead counsel spot in a proposed securities class action against sports betting company DraftKings over a merger partner's alleged black market ties, according to court filings Tuesday.

  • September 01, 2021

    Purdue Pharma Ch. 11 Plan Gets OK With Sackler Releases

    A New York bankruptcy judge on Wednesday approved OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma's Chapter 11 plan, including contentious opioid liability releases for the company's now-former Sackler family owners.

  • September 01, 2021

    Feds Drop 'Varsity Blues' Racketeering Conspiracy Charges

    The government is dropping racketeering conspiracy charges against three college coaches and an administrator swept up in the "Varsity Blues" college admission scandal, according to a recent filing in Massachusetts federal court.

  • August 31, 2021

    1st Circ. Won't Revive Class Claims In ACT Fax Ad Row

    The First Circuit has refused to allow a private high school to press class claims on behalf of thousands of schools that allegedly received unsolicited fax advertisements from college testing provider ACT Inc., finding that the plaintiff could only pursue statutory damages for the three faxes it was sent. 

  • August 31, 2021

    Google Play Store Cases Eyeing Fall 2022 Trial

    Google and the people suing it for allegedly monopolizing its Android Play Store "are not far apart" on when they think the trial should kick off, but the tech behemoth is pushing for an October 2022 start date while the plaintiffs want to start a month sooner.

  • August 31, 2021

    Mass. High Court Hands Pot Shop 2 Wins In Local Feuds

    Massachusetts' highest court has handed down two decisions in favor of a company locked in disputes with its host city and neighbor over whether it can operate a for-profit cannabis retailer.

  • August 31, 2021

    Tufts Settles Claim It Punished Student For Bogus-Data Report

    Tufts University on Monday settled a former student's $1 million lawsuit accusing the Boston-area school and its employees of retaliation and defamation after she exposed allegedly fabricated data in a published neuroscience article.

  • August 31, 2021

    Ex-Mayor's Sprawling Trial Didn't Skew Verdict, Feds Say

    A former Massachusetts mayor can't claim "spillover prejudice" improperly led jurors to convict him of fleecing investors and extorting marijuana businesses because he explicitly agreed to a single trial on all the charges, federal prosecutors said Monday.

  • August 31, 2021

    'Varsity Blues' Parents Say Zoom Trial Will Stir 'Media Frenzy'

    Two parents set for trial in the "Varsity Blues" college admission scandal asked a Massachusetts federal judge on Monday not to live stream the proceedings, claiming the broadcast would whip up a "media frenzy" and spoil their shot at a fair trial.

  • August 30, 2021

    Law360 MVP Awards Go To 182 Attys From 77 Firms

    The elite slate of attorneys chosen as Law360's 2021 MVPs have distinguished themselves from their peers by securing hard-earned successes in high-stakes litigation, complex global matters and record-breaking deals.

  • August 30, 2021

    Meet The Key Players In The First 'Varsity Blues' Trial

    Two and a half years after federal prosecutors unveiled fraud charges against a parade of Hollywood actors and business scions, the first trial in the "Varsity Blues" college testing and admissions case is set to kick off next month.

  • August 30, 2021

    Hub Hires: Day Pitney, Holland & Knight, Womble Bond

    In addition to rain and hurricane warnings, the Boston area was awash in attorney hires and other legal industry moves in August, including the wind-down of a boutique employment firm and the launch of a BigLaw outfit's local lobbying arm.

  • August 30, 2021

    Vaccines, Tuition, Race: The Litigation On Law Schools' Radar

    Lawsuits over student vaccine mandates, tuition refunds for remote classes, free speech issues and race-conscious admissions are all being watched closely by law schools as the fall semester begins.

  • August 30, 2021

    How Firms Can Help Law Schools Leap Into The Future

    While law schools are shaping the next generation to fill law firm's ranks, the inverse is also true: law firms can help steward schools even further into a new age of the profession. Here, Law360 Pulse explores how firms can influence change in the law school-to-law firm pipeline.

  • August 30, 2021

    4 Ideas For Updating Law Schools Post-Pandemic

    Law schools were thrown into a lurch during the COVID-19 pandemic, reinvigorating a debate about the need to modernize them. Here, legal experts explain four ways that law schools can continue to evolve post-pandemic.

  • August 30, 2021

    Original 'Cheers' Pub Can't Get Pandemic Insurance Coverage

    A Massachusetts federal judge has tossed a lawsuit seeking pandemic-related insurance coverage for the bar from the hit NBC sitcom "Cheers," ruling that the presence or threat of the coronavirus does not constitute a direct physical loss of, or damage to, the property where everybody knows your name.

  • August 27, 2021

    Media Co. Says Disability Doesn't Defeat Harassment Story

    Boston Globe Media Partners has asked the Second Circuit not to revive defamation claims lodged by the retired co-founder of a health care and biotech hedge fund, saying his argument that it was physically impossible for him to sexually harass his former employees due to his quadriplegia lacks merit and is inconsequential to the allegations.

  • August 27, 2021

    Judge Denies 'Fishing' Request For Morgan Lewis, EBay Docs

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Friday rejected a former eBay Inc. executive's bid for pretrial subpoenas in an alleged cyberstalking case as a "fishing expedition" for files from the company and its counsel at Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP.

  • August 27, 2021

    Law360's Tort Report: Ex-'SNL' Actor Hit With Sex Assault Suit

    Sexual assault allegations against a former "Saturday Night Live" actor and a bid by health care groups to keep a coronavirus wrongful death suit in federal court lead Law360's Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • August 27, 2021

    Goodwin-Led Software Co. Toast Readies IPO

    Restaurant software developer Toast filed plans for an initial public offering Friday with help from Goodwin Procter and underwriters' counsel Sullivan & Cromwell, as it looks to raise cash after growing during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • August 27, 2021

    Hinshaw & Culbertson Adds New Jersey Office And 8 Attys

    Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP has expanded its Northeast presence with a new office in New Jersey and the addition of eight attorneys from Parker Ibrahim & Berg LLP to its consumer financial services practice.

  • August 27, 2021

    UMass Students Lose Bid To End School Vaccine Mandate

    Two University of Massachusetts students lost their bid to avoid a COVID-19 vaccine in order to return to campus in the coming weeks when a federal judge issued an order Friday backing the school's ability to mandate the public health measure.

Expert Analysis

  • Make Profitability Management Part Of Your Law Firm Culture

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    As the legal industry continues to change in the post-pandemic world, law firms should adapt to client demands by constantly measuring and managing the profitability of their services, says Joseph Altonji at LawVision.

  • Eaton Vance Fund Ruling Shows Perils Of Defensive Bylaws

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    In light of a Massachusetts court's recent ruling in Eaton Vance Senior Income Trust v. Saba Capital Master Fund, reaffirming fund shareholders' voting rights, trustees and advisers should proceed cautiously when implementing bylaws that make it harder for shareholders to exercise those rights, says Aaron Morris at Barr Law.

  • 4 Trends In Discoverability Of Litigation Funding Documents

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    Recent rulings shed light on how courts and international arbitration tribunals decide if litigation funding materials are discoverable and reaffirm best practices that attorneys should follow when communicating with funders, say Justin Maleson at Longford Capital and Michele Slachetka and Christian Plummer at Jenner & Block.

  • Cannabis Legalization's Effects On Insurance Industry

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Resolution of the legal uncertainty presented by the dueling federal and state approaches to cannabis will pave the way for legal cannabis businesses to access the insurance protections the industry needs for everything from workers' compensation to auto insurance to general liability, says Christy Thiems at the American Property Casualty Insurance Association.

  • 7 Lessons For Young Lawyers Starting Their Careers

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    This year's law graduates and other young attorneys must recognize that the practice of law tests and rewards different skills and characteristics than law school, and that what makes a lawyer valuable changes over time, says Vernon Winters, retired partner at Sidley.

  • COVID Eviction Bans May Not Continue To Survive In Court

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    State and local moratoriums against evictions during the pandemic are likely to withstand plaintiffs' constitutional challenges in the short term, but plaintiffs may start to see more success as time goes on, say attorneys at Goodwin.

  • The Pandemic's Bright Spots For Lawyers Who Are Parents

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    The COVID-19 crisis has allowed lawyers to hone remote advocacy strategies and effectively represent clients with minimal travel — abilities that have benefited working parents and should be utilized long after the pandemic is over, says Chelsea Loughran at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Opinion

    Revise Mansfield Diversity Mandates To Also Benefit Veterans

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    The well-intentioned efforts and salutary purposes of the legal industry's Mansfield Rule diversity metric are tainted by the Diversity Lab initiative's omission of veterans, who are underrepresented at large law firms and entitled to advantageous treatment based on more than 200 years of public policy, says Robert Redmond at McGuireWoods.

  • AGs To Fill Void As Justices Say FTC Can't Impose Restitution

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    State attorneys general are likely to emerge as even more influential consumer protection enforcers, taking the lead in federal-state restitution partnerships, following the U.S. Supreme Court's determination Thursday in AMG Capital v. Federal Trade Commission that the FTC is not authorized to seek equitable monetary relief, say Alissa Gardenswartz and former Sen. Mark Pryor at Brownstein Hyatt.

  • Mich. Pandemic Rent Ruling Is A Critical Win For Tenants

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    A Michigan federal court's well-reasoned decision in Bay City Realty v. Mattress Firm, upholding temporary frustration as a valid defense for failure to pay rent during the pandemic, rejects common commercial landlord arguments and is likely to contribute toward a growing trend of decisions favoring tenants, says Aaron Goodman at Baker McKenzie.

  • Bankruptcy Litigation Could See More Third-Party Funding

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    The next few years could be an opportune time for bankruptcy litigants to capitalize on the advantages of third-party financing as the obstacles to its use — including attorney ethics issues and prohibitions against champerty — seem to be clearing at a slow but steady pace, say Daniel Simon and Natalie Rowles at McDermott.

  • Perspectives

    States Must Factor Race In COVID-19 Vaccine Prioritization

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    In order to ensure equity and efficiency in controlling the pandemic, states should use race as a factor in vaccine prioritization — and U.S. Supreme Court precedent on affirmative action and racial integration offers some guidance on how such policies might hold up in court, say law professors Maya Manian and Seema Mohapatra.

  • Prepare For Global Collaboration In Crypto Tax Enforcement

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    Recent Internal Revenue Service victories involving John Doe summonses served on cryptocurrency exchanges — and statements by the Joint Chiefs of Global Tax Enforcement about global collaboration in cryptocurrency-related tax investigations — should prompt assessment of prior virtual currency transactions and remediation before an enforcement agency shows up at the door, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Why The Future Law Firm Model Is Industry-Based Offerings

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    Multidisciplinary, industry-based groups at law firms allow for more holistic legal advice, lead to sustainable client relationships, and are likely to replace practice group monoliths at many firms, say Jennifer Simpson Carr at Furia Rubel, Timothy Corcoran at Corcoran Consulting and Mike Mellor at Pryor Cashman.

  • Ruling Shows 5th Circ. Reluctant To Second-Guess Agencies

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    The Fifth Circuit's recent opinion in Sierra Club v. U.S. Department of the Interior, declining to overturn a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service ruling allowing impacts to two endangered cat species, confirms the court's deferential standard of review for agency decisions backed by reasonable justification, says Rebecca Barho at Nossaman.

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