Florida

  • November 06, 2019

    Fla. Judge Won't Break Up Chiquita Terror-Funding MDL

    A Florida federal judge refused a request to send more than 2,000 claims over purported Chiquita-funded terrorism back to Washington, D.C., reasoning late Tuesday that the allegations would be more efficiently litigated with similar suits currently grouped in the Sunshine State.

  • November 06, 2019

    Fla. Justices Question State Bar's Call To Strip Atty's License

    The Florida Supreme Court pushed back Wednesday on the Florida Bar's argument that it should disbar a former attorney at Tripp Scott PA, despite several justices expressing doubts about the lawyer's truthfulness in a personal bankruptcy at the heart of his discipline case.

  • November 06, 2019

    Outback Steakhouse Exploring Sale After Activist Pressure

    Outback Steakhouse’s parent said Wednesday it is exploring strategic alternatives including a potential sale, in an announcement that comes two months after activist investor Jana Partners disclosed a stake in the company and said its shares were undervalued.

  • November 06, 2019

    Ogletree, Husch Vets Among 11th Circ., Trial Court Picks

    Veteran attorneys from Ogletree Deakins and Husch Blackwell and a politically charged pick for the Eleventh Circuit were among President Donald Trump's latest picks for federal court vacancies Wednesday.

  • November 06, 2019

    Merrill Lynch, Raymond James To Pay Back $12M In Fees

    Merrill Lynch, Raymond James & Associates Inc. and Raymond James Financial Services Inc. have agreed to shell out a total of $12 million in restitution to investors who the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority says were overcharged for contributions to their children’s tuition-savings accounts, the agency announced Wednesday.

  • November 05, 2019

    Anti-SLAPP Advocates Positive Despite Nixed Appeal In Fla.

    First Amendment rights advocates were encouraged by a decision from Florida's Fourth District on a state statute that's designed to prevent lawsuits aimed at hindering the exercise of free-speech rights, even though the court rejected an appeal that relied on that law.

  • November 05, 2019

    SEC Wants Quick Win In $30M Sports Betting Scheme Suit

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is asking a Nevada federal court to hand down a default judgment against a broker and a financial services company, saying they’ve failed to respond to a complaint alleging they were part of a $30 million sports betting scheme.

  • November 05, 2019

    Dentist Who Hid Email Can Drop IP Suit If He Pays Defense Bill

    A Florida federal judge said Monday that he would grant a dentist's motion to voluntarily dismiss his copyright case against a website design company, but only if he pays the defense's legal expenses after it was revealed he had not produced a crucial email message.

  • November 05, 2019

    Expedited Deposition OK'd In $10B 'Bitcoin Inventor' Case

    A federal judge in Florida granted an expedited motion Tuesday allowing for an out of state deposition to take place later this week in the Craig Wright saga despite Wright's opposition on grounds that his team was given merely days notice.

  • November 05, 2019

    Citigroup Fraud Suit Belongs In US Court, 11th Circ. Told

    A group of 39 parties suing Citigroup over its alleged role in a massive cash-advance fraud scheme told the Eleventh Circuit Tuesday that a Florida federal judge erred by not applying a strong presumption in favor of their choice of forum when he found the case belongs in Mexico.

  • November 05, 2019

    Fla. Tax Prep Co. Hits Franchisees With Defamation Suit

    Happy Tax Holding Corp. hit a group of former and current franchisees with a lawsuit in Florida federal court Monday, claiming they launched a "vindictive campaign" against the tax preparation company and sent investors and employees defamatory emails that infringed its trademarks and called its founder a liar and bully.

  • November 04, 2019

    Ballot Measure Can't Legalize Pot, Fla. Legislators Say

    Florida's House of Representatives urged the state Supreme Court to agree a citizen petition to legalize adult use marijuana is an improper use of the petition process that "attempts to legislate through the ballot box."

  • November 04, 2019

    Split 11th Circ. Upholds CWA Permit For Fla. Phosphate Mine

    A divided Eleventh Circuit panel upheld a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers water permit for a phosphate mine in Florida on Monday, deciding the permit’s scope was limited and didn’t require an analysis of a radioactive byproduct.

  • November 04, 2019

    Raydon Must Face ERISA Suit Over Plan's $60.5M Share Buy

    Raydon Corp. must face a former employee's suit claiming top executives sold company stock to its retirement plan for the inflated price of $60.5 million, a Florida federal judge ruled Monday, saying the allegations are imperfect but clear enough to proceed.

  • November 04, 2019

    Settlement Talks Falter In $10B Suit Against Bitcoin 'Inventor'

    Settlement talks in the high-profile case pitting Craig Wright, the self-styled inventor of Bitcoin, against the estate of his late business partner broke down last week after Wright abruptly pulled out of a tentative deal, according to a filing in Florida federal court.

  • November 04, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: N&S Properties, Nuveen, Shorenstein

    N&S Properties is said to have sold a Florida hotel for $27.8 million, Nuveen Real Estate has reportedly sold an Illinois apartment building for $57.5 million, and Shorenstein is said to have scored $350 million in financing for a Broadway office and retail property.

  • November 04, 2019

    Del. Justices Won't Revive $283M NCI Go-Private Suit

    The Delaware Supreme Court on Friday upheld the Chancery Court's decision to toss an NCI Inc. investor suit claiming the tech company's founder and majority owner pushed through an underpriced and unfair $283 million go-private sale to benefit his own retirement interests.

  • November 04, 2019

    Widow's Protest Of $220K Tax Liability Rejected By High Court

    A Florida widow owes the IRS $220,000, as the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday let stand an Eleventh Circuit ruling that her due process rights were not violated when she was prevented from submitting an affidavit to a lower court.

  • November 04, 2019

    Fla. Mall's Roof Was Damaged Before Irma, Insurer Says

    An insurance company told a New York state court that it should not be required to pay for damages allegedly incurred at the Mall of the Americas from Hurricane Irma on the grounds that damage to the roof, among other conditions, occurred prior to the storm.

  • November 04, 2019

    Fla. Amusement Park Sued Over Child's Zip Line Fall

    A mother whose son fell from a zip line ride and sustained injuries at an indoor theme park in Florida sued the enterprise and its franchisor in state court Monday over claims they were negligent in the ride's operation and employee training.

  • November 04, 2019

    4 Charged In Scheme To Smuggle Military Boats To China

    A U.S. Navy officer, his wife and two Chinese nationals have been indicted in Florida federal court on charges related to an alleged conspiracy to smuggle military-style inflatable boats and motors to China, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • November 04, 2019

    Pot Co. Contract May Be Void Under US Law, Judge Says

    A Seattle federal judge has said that the court may not be able to enforce a commercial contract at issue in a dispute between cannabis companies because it cannot award an ownership interest in a federally illegal drug operation.

  • November 04, 2019

    Medical E-Records Provider Scores $19.5M IP Verdict In Miami

    A federal jury in Miami on Monday awarded electronic medical records provider Kipu Systems LLC $19.5 million in total damages after finding that the owners of a now-defunct South Florida rehab center breached a contract with the company and stole its trade secrets to make a copycat product.

  • November 01, 2019

    Congress Eyes New Office For Veterans Courts

    Under a bipartisan bill that passed the U.S. House of Representatives last week, specialized criminal courts for military veterans facing minor charges could get a dedicated office in the U.S. Department of Justice to coordinate grants, training and other assistance — with $25 million expected in new funding.

  • November 01, 2019

    Strip Club Must Face Disputed Dancer's Wage Suit

    A Florida federal judge refused a strip club's bid to toss a purported former exotic dancer's wage-and-hour suit, despite the club's insistence that the woman wasn't an employee but rather a customer who got kicked out twice for disorderly conduct.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Castillo Reviews 'Raising The Bar'

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    A timely new book, “Raising the Bar: Diversifying Big Law," is one of the first honest assessments of the challenging battleground for people of color at large law firms, and I hope that firm management committee members read it, says U.S. District Judge Rubén Castillo of the Northern District of Illinois.

  • State Net

    New State Data Protection Laws Focus On Biometrics

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    This year, at least 26 states have weighed bills specifically concerned with the collection, retention and use of biometric data. Lawmakers have demonstrated a growing emphasis on broadening the types of data that need to be protected, says Rich Ehisen of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Opinion

    A Welcome Turning Of The Tide On State Preemption Of Cities

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    The troubling trend of state preemption of local authority across a wide array of policy areas seemed only to be growing until this spring’s legislative season, which saw states reconsidering and even beginning to unwind a legacy of interference, says Nestor Davidson, a professor at Fordham Law School.

  • Debunking 3 Myths About Contract Attorneys

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    Although contract attorneys represent a quality source of legal work, inaccurate assumptions cause many legal departments and law firms to hesitate when considering them, say Matthew Weaver and Shannon Murphy of Major Lindsey.

  • How Travel Cos. Should Respond To Trump Cuba Restrictions

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    The Trump administration recently introduced further restrictions on nonfamily travel to Cuba. Businesses in the travel sector may want to consider recharacterizing their services to fit a travel general license that continues in effect, say attorneys with Hunton.

  • Opinion

    FERC Not Obliged To Vet Pipeline Downstream Climate Impact

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    In Sierra Club v. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in 2017, and again in Birckhead v. FERC in June, the D.C. Circuit directed FERC to evaluate climate change effects when issuing pipeline certificates. But FERC lacks the authority to deny certificates based on such concerns, says James Costan of Dentons.

  • Patient Drug Guides Vs. The Learned Intermediary Doctrine

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    The Fourth and Eleventh Circuits' recent rejections of claims that a drug manufacturer violated its duty to provide a medication guide to patients affirm that our medical system still puts the physician between the medication or treatment and the patient for a reason, say Cara Edwards and Brooke Kim of DLA Piper.

  • Paid Family Leave In 2019: A Multinational Employer's Guide

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    As developed countries across the globe are increasingly adopting and augmenting paid family leave laws, Elizabeth Ebersole and Colton Long at Baker McKenzie discuss what multinational and U.S. employers need to know about the current paid family leave landscape and key action items for staying ahead of the many developments.

  • 5 Hard Phrases Lawyers Should Master

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    While Kelly Corrigan's popular book, "Tell Me More: Stories About the 12 Hardest Things I’m Learning to Say," focuses on simple words or phrases that individuals can use to improve their personal lives, attorneys can utilize Corrigan's advice for professional benefit, says Karen Ross of Tucker Ellis.

  • Insurer Rebate Laws May Shift Toward Allowing Smart Devices

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    A recent amendment to Florida law that loosens rebate restrictions for insurers may be indicative of regulators’ growing acknowledgment that the loss-mitigation benefits that connected technologies like Fitbits offer outweigh the potential risk of unfair business practices, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • How States May Regulate Income Share Agreements

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    Absent passage of the recently introduced federal Income Share Agreement Student Protection Act, states could view income share agreements — a new form of educational financing — through the lens of traditional loans or wage assignments and attempt to regulate them accordingly, say Alissa Gardenswartz and Nichole Burnett at Brownstein Hyatt.

  • E-Discovery Experts Could Increase Fed. Court Efficiency

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    As electronic data demands on federal courts continue to increase, it may be time to consider whether the courts should establish an office that could be staffed with technical experts familiar with electronic discovery issues, says Douglas Smith of Kirkland.

  • State Net

    A Look At How States Are Experimenting With Health Care

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    The fate of the Affordable Care Act is currently pending in federal court, but states are proceeding on the premise that the law will survive its latest legal challenge as they consider competing Democratic and Republican visions of health care, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Opinion

    Time To Heed Justice Stevens' Criticism Of Gun Decision

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    Justice John Paul Stevens was right that the U.S. Supreme Court's 2008 gun rights decision in Heller desperately needs to be overruled, but while he viewed revision or repeal of the Second Amendment as the easier course for correction, only the court can clean up the mess it made, says Robert Ludwig​ of the American Enlightenment Project.

  • Remembering Justice Stevens As A Law Firm Leader

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    Rothschild Barry's John Coffey, who joined Justice John Paul Stevens' law firm in 1965, shares what it was like to watch Justice Stevens practice law, mentor younger lawyers and land a malfunctioning plane.

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