International Arbitration

  • August 24, 2021

    Court Blocks Crypto Transfers Linked To Bitcoin SV Attack

    The owner of cryptocurrency exchange Bitmart can get a court order preventing suspected hackers from making fraudulent transfers after an attack on the Bitcoin SV network, a New York federal judge said.

  • August 24, 2021

    Alito No Longer Recused From Boeing Engine Fire Case

    Justice Samuel Alito is no longer recusing himself from a dispute over a Boeing engine tailpipe fire that turns on whether federal courts may compel discovery for use in private commercial arbitrations abroad, a move that is possibly the result of a stock divestment.

  • August 24, 2021

    Donziger Prosecution Didn't Flout DOJ Authority, Judge Says

    Steven Donziger hasn't shown that the special prosecutor in his criminal contempt case lacked government oversight, a Manhattan federal judge said in rejecting a new trial bid from the disbarred human rights attorney.

  • August 23, 2021

    7th Circ. Sides With Underwriters In Asbestos Claims Fight

    The Seventh Circuit has refused to vacate an interim order issued by an arbitral tribunal barring future billings to Lloyd's of London underwriters under certain reinsurance policies covering asbestos losses, ruling Monday that the parties' contract gave the arbitrators a broad mandate.

  • August 23, 2021

    Ex-MSC Cruises Crew Member's Injury Suit Must Be Arbitrated

    A Florida federal judge granted MSC Cruises' request to compel arbitration for a former crew member's suit, ruling that although a collective bargaining agreement and employment contract have conflicting arbitration provisions, they do not cancel each other out.

  • August 23, 2021

    Oil Co. Atty Says He Hid Nothing In $392M Award Case

    Counsel for an oil company looking to enforce a $392 million arbitral award against an Occidental Petroleum Corp. unit is fighting back against allegations that he improperly hid an ongoing relationship with one of the arbitrators, saying he's "outraged" about the attack on his reputation.

  • August 23, 2021

    Jones Day Slams Orrick's Bid To Avoid Top Brass Testifying

    Jones Day urged a California federal court Friday to force Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP to provide testimony in an ongoing confidential international arbitration in Washington, D.C., saying Orrick's arguments that the California court doesn't have jurisdiction to enforce an arbitrator's summonses "fly in the face" of law and policy.

  • August 23, 2021

    Arnold & Porter Adds Ex-Clifford Chance Finance Partner

    Arnold & Porter has added a finance partner, formerly of Clifford Chance, in New York, the firm announced Monday.

  • August 20, 2021

    Moldova Says EU Ruling Warrants Stay Of $58M Award Suit

    Moldova urged a D.C. federal judge to pause a $58 million award enforcement suit against it, arguing that the award will most likely get tossed after a legal adviser to Europe's highest court recently ruled that the underlying arbitration agreement is invalid.

  • August 20, 2021

    Chinese Restaurateur Says NY Suit Must Be Tossed

    A Chinese restaurant mogul is urging a New York court to toss litigation aimed at seizing a swanky Manhattan condo to enforce a $142 million arbitral award, which was issued against her after she allegedly lied about the financial success of her South Beauty restaurant chain.

  • August 20, 2021

    Crystallex Stockholders Battle In Del. For Ch. 15 Examiner

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge ordered a report Friday on Canadian insolvency proceedings for Crystallex International Corp. after stockholders said their objections went nowhere in Canada and sought appointment of an examiner and independent counsel via the American Chapter 15 portion of the case.

  • August 20, 2021

    Dentons Can Arbitrate Fight Over Ex-Partner's Firing

    Dentons has earned a victory in an ugly public dispute with a former partner who says he was wrongly fired because of a falling out over a $34 million contingency fee, as a New York state judge ruled Friday that the case belongs in arbitration.

  • August 20, 2021

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen a third-tier soccer club accuse Mishcon De Reya LLP of professional negligence, an English university sue three security companies, and Aon hit with a pensions suit. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • August 19, 2021

    ArcelorMittal, Owed $1.4B, Targets Essar Over Alleged Fraud

    ArcelorMittal has sued the principal holding company of Indian conglomerate Essar Group in New York, seeking to unwind an allegedly fraudulent transfer of a billion-dollar-plus asset that the steel manufacturing giant says has stymied its efforts to collect a $1.4 billion arbitral award.

  • August 19, 2021

    US Says $380M Award In 1MDB Fraud Case Is Fair Game

    U.S. government officials say they have shown a clear connection between the perpetrator of a $1 billion 1MDB fraud, his companies, and the proceeds of a Venezuelan drilling project, warranting the seizure of a $380 million arbitral award.

  • August 19, 2021

    Coal Cos. Rapped For Missing Emails On Brazilian Iron Buy

    A New York federal judge has sanctioned coal magnate Hans J. Mende and his companies for their "unjustifiable failure" to preserve emails related to a $48 million arbitral award over an iron purchase contract in a suit filed by several Brazilian companies seeking to enforce the award.

  • August 19, 2021

    Essex Court Silk Departs For Brick Court After Sanctions

    Another veteran barrister has departed Essex Court Chambers and joined the ranks of its rival, Brick Court Chambers, in the wake of sanctions imposed by China for criticism of Beijing's treatment of the Uyghurs. 

  • August 19, 2021

    Saudi Arabia Challenges EU Duties In Its 1st-Ever WTO Case

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has brought its first-ever complaint at the World Trade Organization, crying foul over the European Union's levies on a chemical compound used to make antifreeze and plastics, according to documents published Thursday.

  • August 18, 2021

    King & Spalding Says Fee Fight Must Be Arbitrated

    King & Spalding is urging a Texas court to force a former client to arbitrate allegations that the firm fraudulently colluded with Burford Capital to maximize fees while representing him ​​in a treaty claim​ against Vietnam, pointing to an arbitration clause in the underlying fee agreement.

  • August 18, 2021

    Koch Nabs Confirmation Of $400M Award Against Venezuela

    A D.C. federal magistrate judge on Wednesday granted a bid by two Swiss Koch Industries affiliates to confirm a roughly $400 million arbitration award against Venezuela, ruling that the country has presented no grounds to contest the authenticity of the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes award.

  • August 18, 2021

    Curtis Establishes New Office In Saudi Arabia

    Curtis Mallet-Prevost Colt & Mosle LLP has opened an office in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, for its 19th global office, in association with newly formed Trafua Legal Consultants, the firm announced.

  • August 18, 2021

    Steinmetz Could Face Sanctions In Guinea Mining Fight

    A New York judge has given George Soros the green light to pursue sanctions against Beny Steinmetz if he fails to appear for a deposition later this month, as Soros looks to escape the Israeli billionaire's $10 billion lawsuit over an ill-fated Guinean mining project.

  • August 18, 2021

    US, Vietnam Still Seeking Settlement In WTO Fish Dispute

    The World Trade Organization once again delayed its decision in Vietnam's challenge of U.S. duties on frozen fish fillets, according to a notice published Wednesday, as the two governments continue to work toward a resolution in the dispute.

  • August 17, 2021

    Devas Proxies Get OK To Begin Discovery In $1.3B Award Row

    A federal judge in Washington state said Devas Multimedia shareholders would be permitted to track down assets and enforce a $1.3 billion arbitral award they say is owed by Indian space agency Antrix, ruling on Monday that the investors have the legal authority to do so.

  • August 17, 2021

    Chinese Lender Nabs $3.5M Arbitration Award On Default

    A Massachusetts federal judge has ordered a bike-share entrepreneur to pay a Chinese lender a $3.51 million arbitration award rendered in Guangzhou, China, saying his various startups must transfer all of his stock and management rights to the lender.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Effective Ways To Prioritize Client Advocacy

    Author Photo

    To truly support a client going through a complicated lawsuit or a painful experience, lawyers must think beyond interpreting legal guidelines and navigating court proceedings, says attorney Scott Corwin.

  • Remote Law Firm Culture Should Prioritize Associate Training

    Author Photo

    Due to the pandemic, the gap between law school and the first day on the job has never been wider, but law firms can leverage training to bridge that intimidating gap and convey the unique value of their culture in a virtual environment, say Melissa Schwind at Ward and Smith, and William Kenney and Jaron Luttich at Element Standard.

  • Virtual Litigation May Unravel The Narcissistic Lawyer

    Author Photo

    The virtual courtroom limits a narcissistic lawyer's ability to intimidate witnesses and opposing counsel, boast to clients or engage in grandstanding — an unexpected benefit of the global pandemic as some aspects of remote litigation are likely here to stay, says Jennifer Gibbs at Zelle.

  • ABA Remote Work Guide Raises Bar For Atty Tech Know-How

    Author Photo

    A recent American Bar Association opinion on lawyers' ethical duties of competence and confidentiality when working remotely should be viewed as part of a larger movement by which attorneys are being exhorted to develop competence in 21st century technology, say Jennifer Goldsmith at Ironshore and Barry Temkin at Mound Cotton.

  • Lateral Hire Conflict Screening Lessons From DLA Piper Case

    Author Photo

    While a Texas federal court recently denied a motion to disqualify DLA Piper from representing Apple in a patent dispute after the law firm hired an attorney who formerly represented opponent Maxwell, the case is a reminder that robust conflict checks during lateral hiring can save firms the time and expense of defending disqualification motions, says Hope Comisky at Griesing Law.

  • Opinion

    High Court Int'l Discovery Case Fits Mootness Exception

    Author Photo

    Even if the underlying arbitration in Servotronics v. Rolls Royce concludes before the U.S. Supreme Court decides the case, the court should recognize an exception to mootness and resolve the circuit split on whether a U.S. discovery statute applies to international commercial arbitration, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • How USMCA Empowers Investors Against Mexico Power Law

    Author Photo

    U.S. and Canadian investors in Mexico's energy sector pursuing legal remedies against the country's newly amended Electricity Industry Law, which introduces preferences for the Mexican state-owned utility, should consider the ways they can seek relief under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • 3 Cybersecurity Questions To Ask Before A Remote Mediation

    Author Photo

    Lawyers preparing to mediate or arbitrate a case through videoconference should take steps to ensure they and their alternative dispute resolution providers are employing reasonable security precautions to protect digital client data and conform to confidentiality obligations, say F. Keith Brown and Michael Koss at ADR Systems.

  • A Uniform Mediation Act Primer As States Continue Adoption

    Author Photo

    With Georgia expected to soon become the 13th jurisdiction to adopt the Uniform Mediation Act and with more states likely to follow suit amid widespread trial delays, practitioners should familiarize themselves with the act's conflict disclosure requirements and the boundaries of its confidentiality provisions, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • Safeguarding Privileged Communications In A Remote World

    Author Photo

    With the pandemic ushering in remote collaboration tools, counsel must revisit fundamentals of the attorney-client privilege and the work-product doctrine, study cases involving email and other recent technologies, and follow 10 best practices to protect confidentiality, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • 4 Areas Of Cyberattack Vulnerability For Law Firms

    Author Photo

    Recent data breaches involving Goodwin and Jones Day show that cyberattacks are very real threats to the legal profession, especially in the era of remote work, so law firms should revisit common business practices that expose them to unnecessary risks, says Ara Aslanian at Inverselogic.

  • Justices Will Bring Welcome Resolution In Int'l Discovery Row

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision this week to review Servotronics v. Rolls-Royce — a case concerning use of a U.S. discovery statute in aid of private international arbitration — will result in greater certainty as to the statute's scope and allow domestic parties to better defend themselves from foreign discovery requests, say Dan Ward and Elena Davis at Ropes & Gray.

  • How To Help Your Witnesses Overcome Hindsight Bias

    Author Photo

    Witnesses facing tricky questions from opposing counsel often find themselves engaging in hindsight bias, when they use present knowledge to second-guess past actions, but these problematic thought processes can be overcome during deposition or trial preparation through tough questions and some catharsis, says Merrie Jo Pitera at Litigation Insights.

  • NJ 'Reply All' Ethics Opinion Brings New Pitfalls For Attorneys

    Author Photo

    While a recent New Jersey ethics opinion rightly concluded that an attorney cannot claim an ethics violation when opposing counsel replies all to a group email including clients, it runs counter to stances taken by other states and presents new dangers of confidentiality breaches and unfiltered messages to opposing parties, says Roger Plawker at Pashman Stein.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bibas Reviews Rakoff's 'Why The Innocent Plead Guilty'

    Author Photo

    In "Why the Innocent Plead Guilty and the Guilty Go Free,” U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff catalogues the many ways our criminal justice system is broken, and in doing so, gives the public an intimate look into the thoughts, reasoning and personal experiences of a renowned federal judge, says Third Circuit Judge Stephanos Bibas.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the International Arbitration archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!