Native American

  • February 05, 2024

    Groups Urge 9th Circ. To Overturn Alaskan Willow Project

    The Bureau of Land Management should have looked before it leaped in reapproving ConocoPhillips' planned Willow drilling project in Arctic Alaska, the Center for Biological Diversity said Monday, arguing that the agency refused to evaluate the effects of any alternative plans that stranded economically viable oil on the company's land leases.

  • February 05, 2024

    Gold Mine Contractor Can Ditch Navajo's Negligence Claims

    A contractor for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency can ditch negligence claims brought by the Navajo Nation over its work on a gold mine that spewed 3 million gallons of contaminants in 2015, a New Mexico federal judge ruled on Monday.

  • February 05, 2024

    Feds Slam Intervention Bids In BLM Grazing Analysis Dispute

    The Bureau of Land Management and green groups have asked a D.C. federal court to reject efforts by Idaho, Utah and a coalition of agriculture industry groups to intervene in the environmentalists' lawsuit challenging grazing allotments.

  • February 05, 2024

    States, Businesses Push To Sink Feds' Amended WOTUS Rule

    Texas, Idaho and more than a dozen industry groups are asking a Texas federal judge to throw out the U.S. government's latest rule to define the "waters of the United States," arguing that it oversteps federal authorities under the Clean Water Act, is overly vague and flies in the face of a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

  • February 02, 2024

    Clean Energy Can Revive Fossil Fuel Sites, But Risks Abound

    Building clean energy projects on the sites of shuttered or aging coal- and gas-fired power plants is a multibillion-dollar opportunity to accelerate the U.S. energy transition, but there are steep legal and practical hurdles to clear. Here's a rundown of what developers must grapple with if they want to build green on fossil fuel sites.

  • February 02, 2024

    Youths Say DOJ Using Extreme Tactics To Delay Climate Trial

    Young people who claim the U.S. government is violating their rights with energy policies that are worsening climate change hit back against the Justice Department's latest bid to pause their suit before it can go to trial, saying courts should not tolerate its extreme delay tactics and shocking conduct.

  • February 02, 2024

    Tribes Fight Industry Bid To Weigh In On Land Swap Dispute

    The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes are objecting to two industry groups weighing in on a dispute over a federal land transfer for the expansion of a fertilizer plant, telling the Ninth Circuit that the organizations' "impermissibly partisan" arguments offer no novel legal perspectives on the case.

  • February 02, 2024

    Court's Claims Of Internal Dispute A Myth, Tribe Tells Fed. Circ.

    The Winnemucca Indian Colony is asking the Federal Circuit to overturn a decision that dismissed allegations in a $208 million breach of trust suit against the Bureau of Indian Affairs, saying the Court of Federal Claims wrongly characterized the events that underpinned its litigation as an internal dispute within the tribe.

  • February 02, 2024

    Pennsylvania AG's Clout In Opioid Deal Likely Has Wide Reach

    A Pennsylvania court's ruling that the attorney general had the power to overrule local district attorneys' objections to a big opioid settlement could affect the prosecutors' power dynamic beyond the painkiller litigation, overshadowing other areas where they could share jurisdiction or clash over politically sensitive issues, attorneys told Law360.

  • February 01, 2024

    Texas Judge Says Tribal Telecom Immune To Contract Suit

    A telecom owned by the Gila River Indian Community can't be sued in federal court for $247,000 in unpaid invoices stemming from a contract to provide the company with billing software, a Texas federal court has ruled.

  • February 01, 2024

    GAO Nixes Protests To Army's Costly Pick For $549M Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office freed the U.S. Army Materiel Command from claims it unreasonably snubbed two contractors for an installation support deal in favor of a company with a more expensive bid, saying the command justified the price differential.

  • February 01, 2024

    Pharma Hikma Reaches $150M Opioid Settlement With States

    Hikma Pharmaceuticals and several attorneys general announced a $150 million agreement in principle on Thursday resolving cases brought by a group of states and localities alleging the company fueled the opioid crisis by failing to report suspicious opioid orders from potentially illegal distributors.

  • February 01, 2024

    Ariz. Tribes Push To Halt Work On SunZia Line

    Two tribes and conservation groups are urging an Arizona federal judge to pause construction on a 550-mile power transmission line approved by the U.S. Department of the Interior before the work damages historic and cultural resources they claim the government failed to properly assess and safeguard.

  • February 01, 2024

    Native Microcap Co. Seeks Stay In $3.4M Stock Scam Suit

    The chief executive officer of a penny stock company with Native American ties has asked a New York federal magistrate judge to pause a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission suit, saying a trial may not be needed because a share buyback deal is underway.

  • February 01, 2024

    Alaska Tribes Seek Canada Recognition To Consult On Mines

    A group of tribal governments in southeast Alaska is asking Canadian regulators to acknowledge its historic presence along the boundary-crossing Unuk River, in order to protect the watershed from open-pit gold and silver mining Skeena Resources Ltd. is proposing in British Columbia.

  • February 01, 2024

    Energy Co. Seeks Final $12.6M Award For Tribal Equipment

    Merit Energy Operations is asking a federal district court to enter judgment after an arbitration panel determined that two Wyoming Native American tribes must pay $12.6 million to purchase equipment from the company after a lease agreement to operate on reservation land expired.

  • January 31, 2024

    8th Circ. Won't Revisit VRA Ruling Nixing Private Right To Sue

    A split Eighth Circuit panel has declined to rehear arguments in a voting rights case in which civil rights groups accuse Arkansas officials of crafting a redistricting plan that dilutes minority voting strength, in turn upholding its prior ruling that private parties can't sue for alleged violations under Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act.

  • January 31, 2024

    ND Tribes' Bid For District Is Gerrymandering, 8th Circ. Told

    The basis for two Native American tribes' dilution allegations in a Voting Rights Act case constitutes a preference for racial gerrymandering in seeking to join their reservations into one elongated district, North Dakota Secretary of State Micheal Howe told the Eighth Circuit.

  • January 31, 2024

    MAGA Hat Teen Asks Justices To Hear Suit Against Media Cos.

    A man suing news organizations for defamation over their coverage of an encounter he had with a Native American activist while he was a teenager wearing a "Make America Great Again" hat is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to revive his claims, saying the Sixth Circuit was wrong to decide that descriptions of his actions during the confrontation were protected opinion.

  • January 31, 2024

    Tribes, Enviro Orgs. Try To Join Tongass Roadless Rule Fight

    A coalition of tribes, conservation groups, fishers and tourism businesses is pushing to help defend a 2023 rule that reinstated roadless area protections for about 9 million acres in Tongass National Forest and is now being challenged by Alaska, power companies and business and industry groups.

  • January 30, 2024

    EEOC's Kotagal Touts New Effort To Bolster Worker Outreach

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has launched a new initiative led by Commissioner Kalpana Kotagal aimed at making the agency more accessible to workers from marginalized communities, especially in remote parts of the country where the agency's physical presence is limited. 

  • January 30, 2024

    Feds Say Talks Preferred In Wis. Tribal Roads Trespass Suit

    The federal government has said it prefers a negotiated resolution with a northern Wisconsin town that allows it to remain part of a tribal road system, but if an agreement can't be reached, it will continue to pursue trespassing claims and past damages against the municipality.

  • January 30, 2024

    Pipeline Cos. To Pay $7.4M For Oil Spill On Tribal Land

    U.S. officials are proposing an agreement for two companies to pay $7.4 million in penalties to settle Clean Water Act claims stemming from a July 2022 pipeline rupture in Oklahoma that spilled several hundred thousand gallons of crude oil into a creek on land owned by the Sac and Fox Nation.

  • January 30, 2024

    Tribe's Repeat Default Bids Disrespect Court, Blue Cross Says

    Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan says a Native American tribe's third request for a default win in its suit alleging the insurer overcharged for tribe members' care is disrespectful and constitutes a continued violation of a court order for the tribe to identify members involved in the insurance plan.

  • January 30, 2024

    Feds, Tesoro Question Landowners' Bid To Join Pipeline Fight

    The U.S. government has told a North Dakota federal judge that tribal landowners' push to join a pipeline fight with Tesoro High Plains Pipeline Co. LLC may be premature, while the company said it threatens to turn its litigation against the government "into a circus."

Expert Analysis

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Still Murky After A Choppy 2023

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    This year brought several important Clean Water Act jurisdictional developments, including multiple agency rules and a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that substantially altered the definition of "waters of the United States," but a new wave of litigation challenges has already begun, with no clear end in sight, say attorneys at Nossaman.

  • A Former Bankruptcy Judge Talks 2023 High Court Rulings

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    In 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court issued four bankruptcy law opinions — an extraordinary number — and a close look at these cases signals that changes to the U.S. Bankruptcy Code will have to come from Congress, not the courts, says Phillip Shefferly at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • How Purdue High Court Case Will Shape Ch. 11 Mass Injury

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent arguments in Harrington v. Purdue Pharma, addressing the authority of bankruptcy courts to approve nonconsensual third-party releases in Chapter 11 settlement plans, highlight the case's wide-ranging implications for how mass injury cases get resolved in bankruptcy proceedings, says George Singer at Holland & Hart.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

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