Food & Beverage

  • March 23, 2020

    EPA Defends Lifting Restrictions On Alaska Mine Process

    Native American and environmental groups have no right to challenge the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision to withdraw proposed restrictions on a massive gold and copper mining project in Alaska, the agency said.

  • March 23, 2020

    Pension Fund Escapes Kroger Workers' ERISA Suit

    An Illinois federal judge has axed a suit claiming a multiemployer pension plan flouted ERISA by ignoring an offer from Kroger that would have preserved the benefits of workers at the grocery store chain, which was allowed to pull out for $467 million.

  • March 23, 2020

    Coronavirus Collapses Logan’s Roadhouse Ch. 11 Strategy

    The parent company of restaurant chain Logan’s Roadhouse told a Delaware bankruptcy judge the negative impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on its business led to a default under its $138 million post-petition loan and a complete cessation of operations, forcing the company to ask for new procedures to limit its bankruptcy costs.

  • March 20, 2020

    9th Circ. Gives Fred Meyer Applicant 2nd Shot At FCRA Suit

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday partially revived a Fred Meyer job applicant's proposed class action accusing the Kroger subsidiary of providing faulty Fair Credit Reporting Act disclosures, ruling that the company's disclosures contained "extraneous information."

  • March 20, 2020

    Payment Co. Seeks Fees From Rival After $5.7M IP Trial Loss

    Software company iControl Systems USA LLC is seeking an award of $312,000, or 50% of attorney fees and costs, after a successful summary judgment ruling over Financial Information Technologies on four of eight counts in a trade secrets case, though it lost at trial on one of the counts.

  • March 20, 2020

    Farming, Food Groups Sue EPA Over Glyphosate Approval

    Farming and food groups on Friday filed a legal challenge to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's finding that glyphosate, the primary ingredient in Monsanto Co.'s weedkiller Roundup, likely does not cause cancer.

  • March 20, 2020

    Contractors Seek Guidance, Relief Amid Coronavirus Spread

    Ten trade associations representing government contracting businesses have asked federal lawmakers to provide clear direction on how to fulfill obligations for the government amid the spread of the novel coronavirus, saying the guidance so far has been inconsistent.

  • March 20, 2020

    Pot Farm Says Homeowner Must Pay Fees If Stench Suit Fails

    A tangle of landowners and cannabis companies ensnared in a nearly two-year racketeering lawsuit over odors from a marijuana farm have told an Oregon federal court that the homeowner who sued them should fork over attorney fees if her claim falls flat.

  • March 20, 2020

    China Given More Time To Adjust Food Tariffs In WTO Spat

    The U.S. has agreed to give China more time to comply with a World Trade Organization ruling that faulted Beijing's use of tariff-rate quotas on rice, corn and wheat, according to a WTO filing published Friday.

  • March 20, 2020

    Casino Group To Sell French Assets To Aldi For $784M

    French mass-market company Casino Group on Friday said it will sell 567 of its Leader Price stores and three warehouses to Aldi France for €735 million ($784 million).

  • March 20, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen a new lawsuit against truck makers fined for running a cartel, Brown Rudnick file a commercial fraud suit against a law firm in Northern Ireland, and rival insurance brokers go head-to-head over allegations of fiduciary breaches. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • March 20, 2020

    German Eatery Chain Says COVID-19 Will Bankrupt It Soon

    German restaurant chain Vapiano said Friday the COVID-19 pandemic will drive it into bankruptcy within weeks unless the German and other European governments come to its rescue.

  • March 20, 2020

    NY Gov. Orders '100% Of Workforce' To Stay Home

    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Friday ordered most workers to stay home as coronavirus infections soared, allowing exemptions only for "essential services," including food and medicine.

  • March 19, 2020

    Kraft, Mondelez Say CFTC Ducking Contempt Order Too Soon

    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission is asking too soon that an Illinois federal judge vacate a February contempt order he entered over how it announced a since-vacated $16 million enforcement action settlement, Kraft Foods and a former subsidiary said Thursday.

  • March 19, 2020

    NYC Sushi Deliverers Granted Conditional Cert. In FLSA Suit

    A New York federal magistrate judge Thursday conditionally certified a Fair Labor Standards Act collective action brought by delivery people who allege a sushi restaurant failed to pay minimum wage or overtime, saying they provided enough evidence to establish their claims.

  • March 19, 2020

    Beyond Meat Execs Face Another Investor Suit

    Investors have hit Beyond Meat executives with a California federal suit accusing them of underplaying the potential liability from a former supplier's claims that employees fudged a food safety report, leading to a stock drop when the information became public.

  • March 19, 2020

    Farmers Tell High Court Tribes Don't Have Dibs On Water

    A coalition of southern Oregon and Northern California farmers has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to undo a Federal Circuit ruling that determined tribes have priority over farmers for water rights, arguing that the appeals court should have deferred to state law in the matter.

  • March 19, 2020

    MTA Doesn't Owe Michael Jordan's Steakhouse Lost Profits

    A New York judge has ruled that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority doesn’t owe the owner of Michael Jordan’s former steakhouse in Grand Central Terminal any lost profits allegedly caused by construction outside the train station.

  • March 19, 2020

    Louisville Newspaper Beats 'Derby Pie' Trademark Lawsuit

    A Kentucky federal judge ruled Thursday that a Louisville bakery claiming trademark rights to “Derby Pie” couldn’t sue the city's main newspaper for using the treat’s name in stories.

  • March 19, 2020

    Campbell Soup Unit Wants Distributors' Wage Class Suit Axed

    A Campbell Soup Co. unit urged a Pennsylvania federal judge on Thursday to rule that contracts governing how its independently contracted distributors are paid for their work void class claims that the company was improperly withholding wages aimed at compensating them for job-related expenses.

  • March 19, 2020

    As Virus Spreads, Limited Visa Services Could Strain Farms

    The U.S. Department of State’s decision to suspend visa services across the globe in response to the spread of the novel coronavirus could squeeze the agricultural industry by limiting access to migrant farmworkers.

  • March 19, 2020

    Minn. Cos. Request Tax Relief In Wake Of COVID-19 Spread

    Minnesota should consider matching any federal extensions for income tax deadlines and extend deadlines for other state taxes to help businesses deal with the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic, the state chamber of commerce has told government leaders.

  • March 19, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Viacom, Morgan Stanley, Weingarten

    Viacom is reportedly no longer seeking to sell the Black Rock tower in Manhattan amid coronavirus concerns, Morgan Stanley is said to have loaned $63.8 million for eight Bronx multifamily properties, and Weingarten Realty Investors has reportedly picked up a Trader Joe's-anchored shopping center in Florida for $35.5 million.

  • March 19, 2020

    Union Fund Can't Hold Wholesale Grocer Liable In $58M Suit

    A New York federal judge has let C&S Wholesale Grocers Inc. off the hook in a union pension fund’s suit claiming it was responsible for $58 million in withdrawal liability, finding that the company wasn’t the successor to the operator of a warehouse facility upstate.

  • March 18, 2020

    Conn. Liquor Law Fight Has National Impact, Justices Told

    Amid its effort to secure a U.S. Supreme Court review of Connecticut's liquor pricing law, Total Wine & More is pushing back against the state's effort to play down the significance of the case, insisting this week that it will make waves on a national scale.

Expert Analysis

  • When Coronavirus May Trigger SEC Disclosure Requirements

    Author Photo

    Amid uncertainty over the global impact of coronavirus, companies across a variety of industries should evaluate several factors to determine when specific outcomes compel U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission disclosures, says Adele Hogan at Nelson Mullins.

  • Rebuttal

    Discrimination Cases Are Too Complex For AI Fee Prediction

    Author Photo

    A recent Law360 guest article criticizing the New Jersey Supreme Court’s ruling in Balducci v. Cige overlooks the intricate nature of discrimination cases, which renders artificial intelligence an insufficient tool for predicting time and cost, says Paul Aloe at Kudman Trachten.

  • Apple Bag Search Ruling Informs On Calif. Pay Compliance

    Author Photo

    Following the California Supreme Court’s recent decision in Frlekin v. Apple that employees must be paid during required bag searches, employers may want to avoid security screenings entirely, and assume that even short time periods for exit searches should be compensated, say attorneys at Munger Tolles.

  • Courts May Clash With Litigants Over Document Review Tech

    Author Photo

    As courts increasingly accept technology-assisted document review, some are bordering on forcing parties to employ TAR, in which case attorneys may need to step in if their clients prefer other processes, say Donna Fisher and Matthew Hamilton at Pepper Hamilton.

  • Rebuttal

    AI Can't Accurately Predict Case Length And Cost — Yet

    Author Photo

    A recent Law360 guest article argued that artificial intelligence can precisely estimate the length and cost of a new case, but several limitations will likely delay truly accurate predictions for years to come, says Andrew Russell at Shaw Keller.

  • Key Trade Secrets Developments Of 2019: Part 2

    Author Photo

    Last year brought significant news in U.S. trade secret law, including the U.S. Department of Justice’s continued enforcement of its China initiative and further development of the inevitable disclosure doctrine under the Defend Trade Secrets Act, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Prop 65 Chemical Labeling Litigation: Trends And Predictions

    Author Photo

    Product safety litigation brought under Proposition 65, California's chemical disclosure law, shows no signs of slowing down in the coming year — with short-form labels and manufacturers' responsibility for product warnings likely to be key areas of contention, says Anne Marie Ellis of Buchalter.

  • 3 Rulings Show When Litigating Wage Claims Is Worth It

    Author Photo

    Recent decisions from New York federal courts demonstrate when wage and hour defendants may benefit from litigation, rather than an early settlement offer designed to avoid fee-shifting provisions that favor prevailing plaintiffs, says Valerie Ferrier at Martin Clearwater.

  • Lawyers Can Build Trust Through The Spoken Word

    Author Photo

    As attorneys, we may prefer the precision of written communication, but a phone call or an in-person conversation builds trust by letting others see and hear our authentic selves, rather than something constructed or scripted, says mediator Sidney Kanazawa of ARC.

  • Opinion

    Legal Prediction Is Demanding But Not Impossible

    Author Photo

    The New Jersey Supreme Court’s recent decision in Balducci v. Cige incorrectly concluded that predicting the length and cost of a case is nearly impossible, and overlooked artificial intelligence's ability to do so, says Joseph Avery with Claudius Legal Intelligence.

  • Trends In Recent FCPA And Cartel Cases Against Execs

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice has taken more white collar cases against executives to trial this winter, focusing on Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and cartel allegations, and scoring noteworthy victories in a canned tuna price-fixing case and two rate-rigging cases, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • Class Actions Are A Growing Risk For CBD Cos.

    Author Photo

    Warning letters issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission have sparked a wave of class actions targeting CBD companies, which could reduce investment in the industry and lower the number of products in the marketplace, says Christopher Binns of Loeb & Loeb.

  • 3 Employee-Friendly Updates In NY’s 2021 Budget Proposal

    Author Photo

    Reflecting an aggressive effort to pass pro-employee laws, several provisions in New York’s 2021 budget proposal would expand paid sick leave benefits, increase disclosure requirements for state contractors, and alter classification standards for gig economy workers, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Malpractice Landscape Is Becoming Riskier For BigLaw

    Author Photo

    A recent survey of lawyers’ professional liability insurers revealed an increase in malpractice claims against law firms, suggesting clients will demand more accountability in the coming decade, say Gerald Klein and Amy Nguyen at Klein & Wilson.

  • Judging A Book: Humetewa Reviews 'Guilty People'

    Author Photo

    In her new book, "Guilty People," Abbe Smith successfully conveys that seeing ourselves in people who commit crime may be the first step to exacting change in our justice system, says U.S. District Judge Diane Humetewa of the District of Arizona.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Food & Beverage archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!