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Aerospace & Defense

  • June 19, 2019

    Army Record Hints To What Esper Will Bring To Top DOD Role

    Unexpectedly named as the acting defense chief, Army Secretary Mark Esper is now the frontrunner to permanently lead the U.S. Department of Defense, with his record in charge of the Army giving strong hints as to what he will focus on at the top of the Pentagon.

  • June 19, 2019

    NASA Rocket Program Delayed, Over Budget, GAO Says

    NASA is unlikely to meet the 2020 launch date for the first test flights in programs that aim to send humans to the moon and eventually Mars, as the agency deals with ballooning costs and delays, a new report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office details.

  • June 19, 2019

    Contractors' Ex-CEO Altered Letters To Gain Gov't Perks

    A former executive for two U.S. Department of Defense contractors has pled guilty in Florida federal court to altering documents that gave him and his employees access to free government benefits while in Afghanistan, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

  • June 19, 2019

    House Backs Push To Block Trump’s Border Wall Funding

    The U.S. House of Representatives urged a California federal judge Wednesday to block President Donald Trump’s efforts to reallocate defense dollars to a promised border wall's construction, arguing in an amicus brief the move unconstitutionally circumvents Congress’ authority to control federal appropriations.

  • June 19, 2019

    American Airlines Can't Defeat Military Benefits Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has refused to ground the bulk of a proposed class action accusing American Airlines of violating federal anti-discrimination law by failing to give pilots credit for short stints of military leave when calculating profit-sharing awards.

  • June 18, 2019

    Shanahan Steps Down From DOD, Citing Family Situation

    Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan stepped down Tuesday and withdrew from consideration to permanently lead the Pentagon, saying that continuing with the confirmation process would force his children to relive a “painful and deeply personal family situation.”

  • June 18, 2019

    One Aviation Floats Ch. 11 Sale To Lender After Plan Stalls

    Airplane manufacturer One Aviation sought approval late Monday for bidding procedures governing a Chapter 11 sale of assets to its bankruptcy lender, days after creditors and the U.S. trustee called out the company for not moving swiftly enough toward its proposed equity swap.

  • June 18, 2019

    NASA Audit Finds Lab Security Issues Threaten Systems, Data

    NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory has significant cybersecurity weaknesses that put the agency’s systems and data at risk, including a lack of information security controls and a backlog of flagged vulnerabilities, according to an internal audit released Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2019

    Menendez Spars With USTR Over Trump's Mexico Tariff Threat

    Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer clashed on Tuesday over the Trump administration's now-abandoned threat to set tariffs on Mexico to stem the flow of immigrants into the U.S., with the lawmaker questioning the use of duties to address nontrade issues.

  • June 18, 2019

    Suspect Says US Can’t Charge Him With $2B Fraud In Africa

    A Lebanese salesman told a New York federal judge that the U.S. government has yet to show how it is related with $2 billion in allegedly fraudulent loans backed by the government of Mozambique.

  • June 18, 2019

    Rubio Targets Huawei Patent Suits Through Defense Bill

    Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., has filed a measure to block companies on certain U.S. national security watch lists, including Huawei, from bringing patent litigation in the U.S. court system, days after Huawei signaled it wants Verizon to pay for hundreds of technology licenses.

  • June 18, 2019

    Alaska Airlines Can't Dodge Military Leave Pay Suit

    A Washington federal judge on Monday refused to dismiss a proposed class action accusing Alaska Airlines Inc. and its sister company Horizon Air Industries Inc. of shortchanging hundreds of pilots who took short-term military leave on pay and benefits.

  • June 17, 2019

    Watchdog Says Lax Oversight On F-35 Parts Cost DOD $300M

    The U.S. Department of Defense has failed to timely address issues with F-35 spare parts that don't meet contractual requirements, potentially costing it more than $300 million for related workarounds, according to a watchdog report released Monday.

  • June 17, 2019

    Tech Giants Want Out Of Suit Over Deadly Dallas Shooting

    Facebook, Google and Twitter have rebuffed claims that they helped cause the radicalization of a man who killed five Dallas police officers in a 2016 shooting, saying that in a nearly identical case a California federal judge found the tech giants did not have any connection to the shooter.

  • June 17, 2019

    In The Trade Hot Seat: What Congress May Ask Lighthizer

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is in for a busy couple of days. He is slated to testify before House and Senate committees this week, where he is likely to face stern questioning from both sides of the aisle about the administration’s China strategy, a contentious trade deal vote and scores of other hot-button trade issues. Here, Law360 breaks down what to look for as lawmakers roll up their sleeves with the USTR.

  • June 17, 2019

    Army, United Tech Unit Face $31M Cleanup Tab For Calif. Site

    A California property owner has sued the Department of the Army and a United Technologies Corp. subsidiary for $31 million in cleanup costs related to a onetime sewage treatment operation and manufacturing plant, saying the stigma from hazardous materials on the site has made it impossible to sell.

  • June 17, 2019

    Liberty Hall Sells AIM To Sekisui Chemical Group For $510M

    Private equity firm Liberty Hall Capital Partners on Monday said it agreed to sell aerospace composite products maker AIM Aerospace to Japanese chemical company Sekisui Chemical Group for $510 million in cash, in a deal steered by Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • June 17, 2019

    Mayer Brown's DC Office Gets New Managing Partner

    Mayer Brown has a new managing partner in Washington, D.C., with Rajesh De, the head of its global cybersecurity and data privacy practice, focused on growing the office and increasing diversity within the workplace.

  • June 16, 2019

    Vets Win Rare Class Action Status In Suit Over Benefit Delays

    Veterans who seek to appeal the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' denial of their benefits claims often fall into a multiyear black hole of bureaucratic inaction, waiting an average of three years for the agency to simply move their case forward, let alone rule on it.

  • June 14, 2019

    Feds Can't Pause SEC's Civil Suit Against Ex-Theranos Exec

    A California federal judge on Friday refused the government's request to pause a civil suit against former Theranos executive Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani, finding that doing so would be "a gamble" that could unduly prejudice the former leader of the failed blood-test company.

  • June 14, 2019

    Hackers Targeting US Electric Utilities, Researchers Say

    A hacking group that shut down a Saudi Arabian oil and gas facility in 2017 has turned its attention to the electric grid in the U.S. and the Asia-Pacific region, according to new research released Friday.

  • June 14, 2019

    9th Circ. Says Military 'Trans Ban' Injunction Must Be Revisited

    The Pentagon's transgender policy differs enough from an earlier ban that a district court must reexamine its decision to carry over a related injunction, the Ninth Circuit ruled Friday, but the policy is clearly based on transgender status, not a medical condition, and must therefore face heightened scrutiny.

  • June 14, 2019

    Jury Convicts Former FAA Safety Officer In Bribery Scheme

    A former Federal Aviation Administration safety inspector is guilty of taking part in a bribery and fraud scheme, in which he helped a Miami aviation repair company skirt safety regulations in exchange for $150,000 and other gifts, a federal jury found Thursday.

  • June 14, 2019

    Military Bases Lacking Climate Change Plans, GAO Says

    Despite having "repeatedly acknowledged" that extreme weather and climate change poses a threat to its military installations, the Department of Defense has failed to comprehensively plan for and assess these climate risks, according to a government watchdog.

  • June 14, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: WeWork, Maxar Technologies, Total

    WeWork is reportedly mulling a deal to take control of its Indian unit, Maxar Technologies is considering selling its space robotics unit, and Total SA is close to snapping up a stake in Adani Gas.

Expert Analysis

  • How New US M&A Restrictions On China Will Affect Tech Cos.

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    The Trump administration recently launched an unprecedented regulatory blitz designed to further protect domestic information and communications technology and services from what it considers Chinese threats. These steps will constrain transactions that could expand China’s access to the U.S. market and to U.S. technology — and some have an immediate effect, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • An Ethics And Compliance Punch List For Gov't Contractors

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    The U.S. Department of Justice recently reiterated that it will not tolerate government contractors that lack a required business and ethics compliance program. With consequences so high, now is the time for companies that have fallen behind to catch up, say Robert Tompkins and Rodney Perry at Holland & Knight.

  • Government Contractor Compliance: 1 Size Can’t Fit All

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    Contractors that do business with federal, state and local government entities face an interesting — and intensifying — predicament: How to develop a comprehensive yet straightforward compliance program that satisfies varying laws in varying jurisdictions, say Jeniffer Roberts and Katherine Veeder at Alston & Bird.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Can Improve Their Job Interviews

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    When evaluating potential new hires, law firms should utilize structured interviews in order to create a consistent rating system that accurately and effectively assesses candidates' skills and competencies, says Jennifer Henderson of Major Lindsey.

  • Opinion

    Retailers Should Stay Away From Cryptocurrency

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    A number of big-name retailers are reportedly poised to begin accepting bitcoin and other digital currency, but given cryptocurrency's complete and utter lack of oversight, these companies run a perilous gamut of legal, regulatory, financial, ethical and reputational dangers, says cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.

  • Law Firms Can Do Better With Their Mentoring Programs

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    There are a few practical, proactive steps law firms can take to create a mentoring program that pays dividends — instead of creating a mediocre program that both parties see as an obligation, says Kate Sheikh of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • The Latest Developments In Criminal Cases Against Execs

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    This spring, there was some noteworthy news in white collar government investigations impacting executives, including the first successful prosecution in the opioid bribery scheme and the first criminal charges for failure to report under the Consumer Product Safety Act, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 'Rocket Docket' Justifies Its Name For 11th Straight Year

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    The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia “rocket docket” is still the fastest federal civil trial court in the country despite some recent trends causing its median time to trial to grow to 13.2 months, says Robert Tata of Hunton.

  • The NLRB's Mixed Messages About Chain Of Command Rules

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    While the National Labor Relations Board decision in PAE Applied Technologies reaffirmed the board's long-standing hostility to chain of command restrictions on government contractor employee communications, the decision may also include an exception to the rule, says Daniel Altchek of Miles & Stockbridge.

  • Opinion

    FARA Enforcement Is No Slam-Dunk For Prosecutors

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    What support is there for the government’s recent theories of criminal liability under the Foreign Agents Registration Act? There are two possibilities, neither of which stands up to scrutiny, says Jay Nanavati of Kostelanetz & Fink.

  • Measuring The Value Of A Law Firm's Social Media Efforts

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    Most legal marketers struggle to show the return on investment of their social media efforts, but establishing and answering several key questions can help demonstrate exactly how social media programs contribute to a law firm's bottom line, say Guy Alvarez of Good2bSocial and communications consultant Tom Orewyler.

  • How SBA Proposal Would Help Women-Owned Small Biz

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    The federal government has chronically failed to meet the modest goal of awarding 5% of all of its contracts to women-owned small businesses, but recently proposed regulations from the U.S. Small Business Administration may change that, say Douglas Proxmire and Michael Francel at Venable.

  • Reports On USMCA Offer Industry-Specific Guidance For Cos.

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    Recent reports from the International Trade Commission and the U.S. Trade Representative have assessed the likely impacts of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement on the U.S. economy. By reviewing the reports' predictions for their industries, companies can be better prepared in case the USMCA is ratified, say Francesca Guerrero and Kayla Toney of Winston & Strawn.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: OCI, Award Limits, CAGE Codes

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    In this month’s bid protest recap, James Tucker of Morrison & Foerster discusses three recent decisions — addressing exclusion of an offer from competition due to "organizational conflicts of interest," the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ award limitations, and confusion when a bidding entity has multiple commercial and government entity codes.