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Automotive

  • January 15, 2019

    Drivers At Fault For Their Own Stalled Arbitrations, Uber Says

    Uber told a California federal judge on Monday that drivers requesting an order to force the ride-hailing company to cover the costs of their individual arbitrations over a classification dispute are impeding their own progress by seeking the order in federal court and refusing to pay their filing fees.

  • January 15, 2019

    11th Circ. Jettisons NASA Worker’s Army Base Injury Award

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday vacated an injury award in a suit blaming the federal government for injuries a NASA civilian employee suffered in an auto collision due to a U.S. Army base security guard’s alleged negligence, saying the government is immune to liability under the Federal Tort Claims Act.

  • January 15, 2019

    FirstEnergy Customer Violated Ch. 11 Stay, Judge Rules

    An Ohio federal judge agreed Tuesday that a Pennsylvania-based auto parts manufacturer’s move to cancel its deal to buy power from a bankrupt FirstEnergy Corp. subsidiary violated the company’s right to maintain its contractual relationships throughout Chapter 11 proceedings.

  • January 15, 2019

    Fed. Circ. OKs PTAB Decision Letting Patentee Amend Claims

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday upheld the Patent Trial and Appeal Board’s decision to let the owner of an automotive patent amend some claims in an inter partes review after the claims were deemed invalid, leaving in place a rare ruling by the board that found proposed substitute claims patentable.

  • January 15, 2019

    NJ High Court Probes 'Step-Down' Clause In Fatal Crash Row

    The insurance carrier for a BMW dealership must cover a crash in which an off-duty police officer was killed by a drunk driver operating a loaner vehicle from the dealership, counsel for the officer’s estate told the New Jersey Supreme Court at arguments on Tuesday in challenging a state appellate ruling that coverage was not required.

  • January 15, 2019

    Truck Body Maker Tries To Nix Workers' Rest Break Suit

    A truck body manufacturer accused in a proposed class action of failing to provide employees with required work breaks contended in California federal court Monday the suit should be tossed, saying just because employees must stay on-premises, it does not mean that their 10-minute rest periods under state labor laws are being violated.

  • January 15, 2019

    UberBlack Drivers Ask 3rd Circ. To Revive Wage Suit

    A proposed class of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania-area UberBlack limo drivers asked the Third Circuit to revive their suit accusing Uber Technologies Inc. of violating state and federal labor laws, saying a district court prematurely determined they were independent contractors and not employees entitled to minimum and overtime wages.

  • January 14, 2019

    Nissan, Driver Agree To Mediate Defective Sunroof Suit

    Nissan North America Inc. and a consumer in a potential class action accusing the carmaker of selling vehicles with defective sunroofs agreed Monday to mediate the case, just months after a California federal judge denied Nissan's attempt to compel arbitration.

  • January 14, 2019

    Auto Parts Co. Threatens US Exit Over Price-Fixing: Plaintiffs

    A Taiwanese auto parts company has threatened to pull out of the U.S. market if a proposed class of consumers accusing the company of price-fixing keeps pushing for a default judgment instead of accepting a $500,000 settlement the consumers had already rejected, the plaintiffs told a Wisconsin federal court.

  • January 14, 2019

    Don't Confirm EPA Head During Gov't Shutdown, Enviros Say

    Nine environmental and left-leaning groups on Friday urged Republican Senate leaders to halt the confirmation process to promote acting U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler to permanent status while the government is still shut down.

  • January 14, 2019

    UAW Can't Dodge Ex-GM Employees' Age Bias Suit

    A Michigan federal judge on Sunday ruled that the United Auto Workers can't escape an age discrimination suit brought by three former General Motors employees, ruling the UAW's assertion that the workers had to exhaust internal appeals before filing suit wasn't supported by the civil rights cases cited in their argument.

  • January 14, 2019

    Tesla Model 3 Disclosures 'Meaningless,' Investors Say

    Investors on Friday told a California federal judge that Tesla Inc. already knew about extensive problems associated with production on its Model 3 sedan when it publicized "meaningless" hypothetical risks to its production process, so it cannot dodge a proposed class action claiming it misled investors.

  • January 14, 2019

    $3.8M Deal Puts Brakes On Truck Drivers' FLSA Suit

    A Tennessee trucking company has agreed to pay $3.8 million dollars to settle a Fair Labor Standards Act suit alleging it didn't properly pay thousands of drivers for time spent on orientation and training.

  • January 11, 2019

    The Firms That Dominated In 2018

    Law360's top four Firms of the Year notched a combined 32 Practice Group of the Year awards after successfully securing wins in bet-the-company matters and closing high-profile, big-ticket deals for clients throughout 2018.

  • January 11, 2019

    Law360 Names Practice Groups Of The Year

    Law360 congratulates the winners of its 2018 Practice Group of the Year awards, which honor the law firms behind the litigation wins and major deals that resonated throughout the legal industry in the past year.

  • January 11, 2019

    Ex-Ford Worker's Race Discrimination Claims Shot Down

    An Illinois federal judge on Friday dismissed claims by a former Ford Motor Co. employee that he was discriminated against and endured a hostile work environment, finding that the alleged harassment against the African-American worker, including purportedly being called a monkey, wasn't "truly outrageous" and not based on race. 

  • January 11, 2019

    Dems Question EPA On Wheeler Confirmation Hearing Prep

    Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., and fellow Democrats have questioned whether the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has directed employees to work on acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler's confirmation hearing to be the agency's permanent head despite the agency’s shutdown plan mandating that only certain employees continue to work.

  • January 11, 2019

    Ford, UAW Can't Shake Worker's Fair Representation Suit

    Ford Motor Co. and the United Auto Workers must face claims that they mishandled a dispute with a stamping plant employee, who claims she was fired after filing multiple harassment complaints, by appointing a longtime Ford executive's sibling as an arbitrator, an Illinois judge ruled Friday.

  • January 11, 2019

    Peugeot Can't Reverse On $30M 'Blade Runner' Deal: Studio

    Alcon Entertainment prominently featured the logo of French car manufacturer Peugeot in the movie "Blade Runner 2049" as part of a hefty $30 million product placement deal and now the studio wants its money, according to a lawsuit filed Thursday in California federal court.

  • January 11, 2019

    Lyft Driver Cannot End Suit To Trigger Appeal, Judge Rules

    A Lyft driver fighting his status as an independent contractor will have to proceed to arbitration, rather than having his case dismissed so he can appeal to the First Circuit, a Massachusetts federal judge ruled Friday in agreeing with the ride-sharing company's argument that the former path will resolve the putative class action more quickly.

Expert Analysis

  • Why AFAs Are Key To The Future Of Legal Practice

    Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul

    Alternative fee agreements can help align law firm and client interests, increase efficiency and eliminate corporate extortion, among other benefits. They are the best thing to happen to the practice of law in decades, says Kelly Eisenlohr-Moul at Dinsmore & Shohl LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Barron Reviews 'The Clamor Of Lawyers'

    Judge David Barron

    Can lawyers lead a revolution? According to "The Clamor of Lawyers: The American Revolution and Crisis in the Legal Profession" — a slim but elegant volume by Peter Charles Hoffer and Williamjames Hull Hoffer — they can and they did, says First Circuit Judge David Barron.

  • Automotive Tech In 2018: Legal Trends And Developments

    David Cavanaugh

    The legal landscape for the automotive sector continued its evolution in 2018 with the development of new technology becoming a focal point for litigation, patenting and regulation, say attorneys with WilmerHale.

  • Handling Corporate Congressional Probes In The Trump Era

    John Hellerman

    President Donald Trump’s approach to crisis communications has changed the game enough to demand companies' consideration of a whole new set of options. John Hellerman of Hellerman Communications and Bill Pittard of KaiserDillon PLLC discuss whether corporations can successfully use similar tactics.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 2

    Peter Jarvis

    Lawyer-directed nonrecourse litigation funding is more likely to protect a lawyer's exercise of independent professional judgment than traditional means of litigation finance, and furthermore enables worthwhile cases that otherwise could not be funded, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • Shutdown's Messy Impact On Consumer Protection Activities

    Alan Wingfield

    As it appears the federal government shutdown could continue for some time, attorneys with Troutman Sanders LLP discuss its effect on the regulatory and litigation docket for consumer-facing companies.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Lawyer-Directed Litigation Funding In NY: Part 1

    Peter Jarvis

    Contrary to what the New York City Bar Association concluded in an ethics opinion last year, lawyer-directed nonrecourse commercial litigation funding does not violate New York rules on sharing fees with nonlawyers, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson of Holland & Knight LLP.

  • 7 Questions To Add To Your Lateral Partner Questionnaire

    Howard Rosenberg

    Law firms should redesign the vetting process for lateral candidates so it directly addresses sexual harassment and assault issues, says Howard Rosenberg of Decipher.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Reed Smith Chief Marketing Officer Sadie Baron

    Sadie Baron

    In this monthly series, Amanda Brady of Major Lindsey & Africa interviews management from top law firms about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here we feature Sadie Baron, chief marketing officer at Reed Smith LLP.

  • 'Flexible Work' Makes Freelancing More Viable In BigLaw

    Elizabeth Black

    The rise of remote work capabilities and advances in technology are making flexible, freelance legal work a more accessible career option for corporate attorneys, say Elizabeth Black and Sara Eng of InCloudCounsel.