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Transportation

  • May 17, 2019

    Enviros Challenge DOI Approvals For Utah Oil Shale Project

    The federal government failed to adequately assess environmental impacts before granting permits for elements of the nation’s first commercial-scale oil-shale mine and processing plant, environmental groups said in a lawsuit filed Thursday.

  • May 17, 2019

    Gov't Must Provide Info In Challenge To 2-For-1 Rule Order

    The D.C. federal judge presiding over public interest groups' challenge to President Donald Trump's executive order requiring that for every new regulation, two rules must be eliminated, said Friday that federal agencies must do a better job complying with discovery.

  • May 17, 2019

    Airplane Broker Can't Slip 7-Year Sentence For Skimming

    The Eleventh Circuit said Friday that the lower court did not err in ordering a 90-month prison sentence, and more than $600,000 in restitution, for a former airplane salesman convicted of skimming from his employer.

  • May 17, 2019

    UK Truck Cartel Class Cert. Paused Amid Mastercard Appeal

    The U.K.’s competition tribunal pumped the brakes Friday on a class certification bid against Daimler and other truck manufacturers accused of a price-fixing cartel, preferring to wait at least until the country’s high court decides whether to take up Mastercard’s appeal of a decision significantly lowering the certification bar.

  • May 17, 2019

    9th Circ. Says Tesla Can Arbitrate Worker's Race Bias Claims

    A black Tesla employee who says he was constantly subjected to racial epithets, harassment and threats at work and then ignored when he complained must pursue his claims in arbitration, the Ninth Circuit ruled Friday, with the chief judge saying the panel's hand was forced by precedent.

  • May 17, 2019

    7th Circ. Weighs Helicopter, Gun Use In Wis. Recreation Area

    The Seventh Circuit wrestled Friday over whether the federal government should have allowed off-road motorcycle riding, dog training with guns and military helicopter training in a Wisconsin recreational area, questioning if the activities would fall under the recreational uses the state initially intended for the area.

  • May 17, 2019

    Ill. Gov. Offers New, Hiked Taxes In $41.5B Infrastructure Plan

    Illinois would double its gas tax and create taxes on streaming services and ride sharing, among other services, to pay for a $41.5 billion infrastructure plan the governor circulated Friday.

  • May 17, 2019

    Texas High Court Allows Taking Of Developer's Land For Road

    A divided Texas Supreme Court said on Friday the City of Rowlett, Texas, had the authority to condemn land owned by a private developer even though the move helped a rival developer and a private business, deciding that there was a valid public use driving the decision.

  • May 17, 2019

    BMW Blasts EU’s Emissions Tech Cartel Case

    BMW AG’s chief executive on Thursday blasted a European Union investigation alleging that it colluded with other German car makers to keep new emissions technology off the market for several years, calling the claims unfounded.

  • May 17, 2019

    GM Owners Open Faulty-Transmission Class Suit In Del.

    Attorneys for General Motors vehicle owners with allegedly defective transmissions opened a proposed nationwide federal class damages suit in Delaware Friday, becoming at least the third prospective multistate class challenge to the automaker’s gearboxes.

  • May 17, 2019

    DC Circ. Won't Block EPA Small Refiner RFS Waiver Action

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday refused to prevent the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from granting new exemptions to small refiners from the Renewable Fuel Standard program while a biofuel industry group challenges the agency's allegedly revised policy for reviewing exemption requests.

  • May 17, 2019

    CSX Aims To Dump Train Manager's Medical Leave Suit

    CSX Transportation Inc. asked a Florida federal judge Friday to dump a suit from a train manager alleging his position was wrongfully eliminated while he was out on disability leave, insisting the manager wasn’t singled out.

  • May 17, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week has seen a Kazakhstan lender file fraud claims against a dissolved London-based business, a Dubai airport security equipment company sue Barclays, and Yamaha's motorcycle business file claims against a German insurer. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 17, 2019

    11th Circ. Won’t Undo Royal Caribbean's Win In Injury Case

    The Eleventh Circuit has backed a lower court decision favoring Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.'s argument that it is not responsible for a passenger's injury when part of a lighting machine fell on her head while she was on a dance floor, saying she can't show the cruise company is at fault.

  • May 17, 2019

    White House Delays Car Tariffs With Call For Negotiations

    President Donald Trump confirmed on Friday that his administration considers imports of cars, trucks and auto parts a threat to national security, but declined to set tariffs on the goods for now, opening a six-month window to negotiate a compromise with major suppliers.

  • May 16, 2019

    Levi & Korsinsky Wants SEC Files From Musk Tweet Probe

    Levi & Korsinsky LLP asked a D.C. federal court Wednesday to order the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to hand over documents related to its investigation into Tesla CEO Elon Musk's infamous going-private tweet, noting that it is seeking the documents on behalf of shareholders.

  • May 16, 2019

    11th Circ. Revives Hoverboard Fire Suit Against Amazon

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday resuscitated a Georgia man’s suit over a hoverboard he bought through Amazon that started a fire, destroyed his home and severely injured him, finding it's plausible Amazon knew about the risk when it sold the product.

  • May 16, 2019

    Calif. High-Speed Rail Dealt Blow After Feds Nix $929M Grant

    The Trump administration on Thursday canceled a nearly $929 million federal grant for California's $77 billion proposed high-speed rail line, dealing a major blow to the project and catalyzing more legal wrangling between Golden State and federal officials.

  • May 16, 2019

    Texas Appeals Court Awards Equistar Nothing In Pumps Suit

    A Texas appellate court said Thursday that neither Equistar Chemicals nor pump-maker ClydeUnion can recover any damages in a dispute over allegedly faulty ethane pumps, wiping out a lower court's $151,000 award to ClydeUnion because of a litigation cost offset.

  • May 16, 2019

    Feds Urge High Court To Pass On 'Bridgegate' Appeal

    Federal prosecutors on Wednesday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to reject a bid from a former appointee of ex-New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie to review her "Bridgegate" conviction for orchestrating a politically motivated traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge, saying it's backed by sufficient evidence.

Expert Analysis

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Opinion

    Oil Cartel Bill's Passage Is Long Overdue

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    The No Oil Producing and Exporting Cartels Act has been reintroduced in Congress, and the oil market conditions that spurred this needed legislation in 2000 are just as widespread today — but so are the inaccurate criticisms of this bill, says attorney Seth Bloom, who drafted the original version of NOPEC.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • New Questions Over Corporate Officers' Legal Duties

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    Recent litigation between Hertz and its former executives raises novel questions about whether corporate leaders have a legally cognizable responsibility to set the right “tone at the top,” and the consequences if they fail to do so, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • State Net

    State Lawmakers Stepping Up Fight Against Insurance Fraud

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    Insurance fraud costs insurers and their policyholders tens of billions of dollars a year. With insurance fraud-related bills introduced in 40 states and enacted in 14 so far this year, state lawmakers seem to agree with the industry that fraud is a major problem, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Maritime Opinion Offers Hope For 'Bare Metal' Defense

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    In Air and Liquid Systems v. DeVries, the U.S. Supreme Court recently cast doubt on the "bare metal" defense against manufacturer liability in a maritime tort context. But both the majority and dissenting opinions provide a road map to using this defense in other situations, say John Vales and Stephen Turner of Dentons.

  • Getting Out Of Legal Project Management Debt

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    If a client does not demand the application of project management techniques at the start of a matter, or a law firm does not routinely apply them, it is highly likely that additional, avoidable work — legal project management debt — will materialize throughout the matter, says Anthony Widdop of Shearman & Sterling.

  • Opinion

    NAFTA Update A Step Backward For US Investors

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    Under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, U.S. investors would lose the robust international law protections and dispute resolution mechanisms that they have relied on for years in the North American Free Trade Agreement, say Ian Laird and Melissa Morris of Crowell & Moring.

  • 4 Ways State AGs Are Targeting Energy Sector

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    State attorneys general are playing an increasingly prominent role in regulating energy and environmental activity within their states. Energy sector participants should note AG priorities and take a proactive approach, say attorneys at WilmerHale.