California

  • September 24, 2021

    Jury Hears USC Coach Never Heard Of 'Varsity Blues' Recruit

    A former assistant coach for the University of Southern California's women's basketball team told a Boston jury Friday she never heard of a purported recruit who prosecutors say got into the school as part of the "Varsity Blues" admissions scheme.

  • September 24, 2021

    Tesla Can't Exclude Juror Based On Race, Judge Rules

    A California federal judge sustained a Batson challenge during jury selection Friday raised by counsel for a Black ex-Tesla worker claiming that the electric vehicle company's Northern California factory was a hotbed of racial discrimination against African Americans reminiscent of the Jim Crow era.

  • September 24, 2021

    Theranos Execs Put PR Over Patients, Ex-Lab Chief Testifies

    A former Theranos laboratory director testified in ex-CEO Elizabeth Holmes' criminal trial Friday that he resigned after company executives insisted on rolling out blood-testing devices riddled with technical problems that caused serious inaccuracies, saying management "believed more about PR and funding than about patient care."

  • September 24, 2021

    Trump Fights Transfer Of Big Tech Censorship Suits To Calif.

    Former President Donald Trump is urging a Florida federal judge to dismiss requests by Twitter and YouTube to transfer his censorship suits against them to the Northern District of California, saying the forum selection clauses in their terms of service do not apply to governmental entities.

  • September 24, 2021

    Fed. Circ. Rebukes Judge Albright For Still Avoiding Transfers

    The Federal Circuit on Friday ordered U.S. District Judge Alan Albright to transfer six WSOU Investments patent infringement suits against Juniper Networks from Texas to California, holding the nonpracticing entity can't use a Texas litigation office to justify venue and chiding the judge for ignoring recent rulings against him.

  • September 24, 2021

    PG&E Facing Manslaughter Charges Over 2020 Calif. Fire

    A California district attorney on Friday charged PG&E with four felony involuntary manslaughter charges for its role in allegedly causing the Zogg fire, which burned roughly 56,000 acres in two counties last year.

  • September 24, 2021

    States Go First In Google Display Ads Case

    The Texas-led state attorneys general lawsuit against Google will go through briefing on dismissal motions while the rest of the massive consolidated case remains paused, a New York federal judge ruled Friday in an attempt to impose some order on litigation over the search giant's display advertising business.

  • September 24, 2021

    COVID Test Maker, Analytics Firm Price IPOs Totaling $740M

    A COVID-19 home test maker and a software analytics firm went public Friday after raising a combined $740 million in a pair of initial public offerings, guided by four law firms, concluding a busy but bumpy week for IPOs.

  • September 24, 2021

    Marvel Battles To Keep 'Avengers' Characters' Copyrights

    Marvel launched an all-out counterattack Friday on an organized effort by representatives of former Marvel writers and artists to claw back copyrights on iconic characters including Spider-Man, Iron Man and Black Widow.

  • September 24, 2021

    CFPB Nabs $20M Penalty Against Mortgage Lender Exec

    A California federal judge has ordered an executive of mortgage lender Monster Loans to pay a $20 million civil penalty to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which accused him of illegally accessing credit reports for allegedly predatory student debt refinancing companies.

  • September 24, 2021

    California AG Announces Appeal Of Purdue Ch. 11 Plan

    California Attorney General Rob Bonta on Friday became the latest attorney general to announce an appeal of the approval of Purdue Pharma's Chapter 11 plan, saying the OxyContin maker's former owners in the Sackler family must be held accountable for their part in the opioid crisis.

  • September 24, 2021

    Class Slams Cricket's Bid For Arbitration In False 4G Ad Suit

    Cricket Wireless can't attract customers with promises of contract-free service, then turn around and claim they're contracted to arbitrate their claims when sued by those same customers, a California federal court was told.

  • September 24, 2021

    Eagle Hospitality Creditors Say Time's Up For Ch. 11 Plan

    Eagle Hospitality Group is being uncooperative and should not be granted more time to produce a Chapter 11 plan, a group of creditors told a Delaware bankruptcy court, noting that they are waiting in the wings with their own proposal.

  • September 24, 2021

    Walgreens Escapes 'Pink Tax' Suit Over Hair Loss Meds

    A California federal court has tossed a proposed class action against Walgreens by a shopper accusing the company of charging a "pink tax" on women's hair loss products, finding that the pharmacy chain can't deviate on the labeling approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  • September 24, 2021

    Del. Jury Says Comcast App Infringes 1 Of Tech Co.'s Patents

    A federal Delaware jury issued a verdict finding Comcast's Xfinity brand app indirectly infringes a small technology company's patent for a way of turning a remote control into a customer service "concierge device," but cleared Comcast of claims of infringing a related patent.

  • September 24, 2021

    John Stossel Says Facebook Defamed Him With Fact-Checks

    Facebook defamed veteran journalist John Stossel by flagging two of his video reports interviewing climate change experts as containing factual inaccuracies, even though none of the reported information was false, according to a federal lawsuit filed this week in California.

  • September 24, 2021

    Navajo Nation, DOI Agree To Remand In 9th Circ. Land Fight

    The Department of the Interior has joined the Navajo Nation in asking the Ninth Circuit to send a land trust dispute back to district court, agreeing that the tribe should be allowed to file an amended complaint against the government.

  • September 24, 2021

    Calif. Jury Awards $5M In Landmark Cannabis Antitrust Case

    A California jury Thursday awarded $5 million in damages to a marijuana company that said it was prevented from opening in Richmond by a rival group of dispensaries looking to control the local cannabis market, in what the plaintiff's attorneys characterized as the first cannabis-related antitrust case.

  • September 24, 2021

    Tahoe Regional Agency Appointee Sees More Wildfire Hurdles

    The current Caldor fire has not caused the level of devastation in South Lake Tahoe as the Angora fire did 14 years ago thanks to new rules and regulations, but hurdles remain as agencies balance clearing underbrush with protecting property rights, the presidential appointee to the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency recently told Law360.

  • September 23, 2021

    Disney Wrong to Push Co. From Bill Nye Suit, Court Told

    A company claiming it's a profit participant in the TV show "Bill Nye the Science Guy" urged a California appeals court Thursday to overturn a ruling that it doesn't have standing to sue The Walt Disney Co. and Buena Vista Television LLC for a larger share of profits than it's already received.

  • September 23, 2021

    9th Circ. Reverses Order Requiring LA To House Homeless

    The Ninth Circuit said Thursday a California federal judge was wrong to rely on unpled claims and theories, and outside research, in granting a preliminary injunction that would have required the city and county of Los Angeles to provide housing for the homeless people living on Skid Row.

  • September 23, 2021

    UC San Diego Health Sued Over Patient Data Breach

    The University of California San Diego's health system was hit with at least two putative class actions in California federal court this week over a data breach that purportedly compromised hundreds of thousands of patients' medical records and other personal identifiable information.

  • September 23, 2021

    Albright Won't Wait To Transfer 'Venue Manipulation' Cases

    U.S. District Judge Alan Albright has said he won't wait for a patent licensing company to seek Supreme Court review of a Federal Circuit decision that it was engaging in "venue manipulation," opting instead to transfer its infringement suits against Samsung, LG and Uber to California.

  • September 23, 2021

    Schwab Clients Urge Cert. Over Trades Routed Through UBS

    Charles Schwab clients urged a California federal judge Thursday to grant them class status in their securities lawsuit accusing the financial services giant of violating its duty to get them the "best execution" on trade orders by intentionally concealing an agreement routing trade orders through UBS Securities LLC.

  • September 23, 2021

    Calif. Tells 9th Circ. Federal Dam Not Allowed To Hurt Trout

    California has asked the Ninth Circuit to revive a suit aimed at securing more water releases from a dam near Santa Maria for a protected trout's benefit, telling the court in an amicus brief that the dam's authorization doesn't just allow for species conservation, it requires it.

Expert Analysis

  • Perspectives

    One-Subject Rule Strategy Can Defeat Dangerous State Laws

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Ulmer & Berne explain how single-subject rule violation claims can thwart certain unconstitutional or controversial state statutes and protect civil rights in the face of state governments under one-party rule.

  • 3 Attorney Ethics Considerations For Litigation Funding

    Author Photo

    The growth of the litigation finance industry has generated questions on the obligations of counsel when their clients are seeking outside capital to fund litigation, which litigators must understand when providing information to a third-party funder and discussing legal strategy with a client, says Matthew Oxman at LexShares.

  • Key Trends In Recent Cyber-Related Securities Class Actions

    Author Photo

    ​​​​​​​A review of trends from recent cyber-related securities class actions suggests that shareholder plaintiffs will likely continue to focus on public companies' reporting deficiencies, so companies should evaluate and update their disclosures in light of litigation and information security risks, say Cara Peterman and Sierra Shear at Alston & Bird.

  • Commercial Takeaways After Tech Co. Faces Export Fine

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of State recently fined Keysight Technologies for violating U.S. export control requirements, underscoring that commercial sector companies without export compliance resources are still responsible for following the International Traffic In Arms Regulations and the Export Administration Regulations even if they have few government customers, says Thomas McVey at Williams Mullen.

  • 4 Steps For Improving Board Diversity Per New Nasdaq Rule

    Author Photo

    Companies should view Nasdaq's recently finalized board diversity rules as an opportunity to tap into the knowledge and resources of potential board members who may not look like or have the same life experiences as individuals who have historically served on boards, say attorneys at Shook Hardy.

  • How ABA Opinion Shifts Alternative Biz Structure Landscape

    Author Photo

    A recent American Bar Association opinion approving lawyers' passive investment in nonlawyer-owned firms eliminates a hurdle for law firms wishing to scale their practice through alternative business structures, but aspiring investors should follow a few best practices, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Deepika Ravi at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Fed. Circ. Micron IP Ruling Raises Damages Disclosure Bar

    Author Photo

    The Federal Circuit's recent decision in MLC v. Micron, upholding the exclusion of expert testimony on patent damages evidence, may heighten initial discovery burdens, underscoring the importance of providing proper disclosure of damages-related information and positions prior to expert discovery, say Joel Wacek and Brynna Smith at Hoffman Alvary.

  • PAGA Ruling Unlocks Manageability Defense For Employers

    Author Photo

    A California appellate court’s recent first-of-its-kind holding in Wesson v. Staples recognized that claim manageability issues can apply to Private Attorneys General Act cases, opening a path for employers to argue that individualized inquiries and other time-consuming elements make a case too burdensome, say Thomas Kaufman and Harrison Thorne at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Series

    Embracing ESG: HPE Counsel Talk Effective Board Oversight

    Author Photo

    Governance teams can more effectively shape board oversight of environmental, social and governance issues by ensuring organizationwide agreement on the most relevant issues, building a materiality framework that reflects stakeholder input, and monitoring the integration of ESG into operations, say Rishi Varma and Derek Windham at Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

  • How Calif. High Court Rulings Narrow Prevailing Wage Law

    Author Photo

    Two recent rulings by the California Supreme Court in Mendoza v. Fonseca McElroy Grinding and Busker v. Wabtec should come as good news to public works construction contractors, subcontractors and suppliers, as they clarify and limit the scope of the state’s prevailing wage law in several important ways, say Laurence Phillips and Tyler Paetkau at Procopio Cory.

  • Opinion

    Justice Gap Demands Look At New Legal Service Models

    Author Photo

    Current restrictions on how lawyers structure their businesses stand in the way of meaningful access to justice for many Americans, so states should follow the lead of Utah and Florida and test out innovative law firm business models through regulatory sandboxes, says Zachariah DeMeola at the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System.

  • Privacy Now Looms Large In Antitrust Enforcement

    Author Photo

    Recent moves by the Biden administration as well as court decisions indicate that privacy is likely to play an increasingly important role in antitrust litigation, both as a justification used to defend against allegations of anti-competitive conduct, and as an element of product quality that can be restricted or diminished as a result of anti-competitive conduct, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Websites Can Ward Off Novel State Law Wiretap Suits

    Author Photo

    As plaintiffs' legal theories surrounding wiretapping and the use of third-party analytics tools to collect data have evolved, with attorneys now filing privacy and security-breaching suits under state statutes, there are several strategies websites can employ to guard against these claims and defeat class actions, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • What Forced Arbitration Ruling Means For Calif. Employers

    Author Photo

    As a result of the Ninth Circuit's surprising, peculiar decision this week in Chamber of Commerce v. Bonta, employers in California once again face the very real prospect of incurring criminal and civil penalties for simply requesting that employees and applicants agree to arbitrate future disputes, says Anthony Oncidi at Proskauer.

  • When A Denial Of Recovery-Based Insurance Claim Is Invalid

    Author Photo

    Two recent court decisions show that policyholders should not accept denials of coverage based on the uninsurability of restitution or disgorgement-based losses without a detailed, two-part analysis of the specific state's law and the particular facts of the loss, say Stephen Raptis and Emily Buchanan at Haynes and Boone.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!