California

  • October 11, 2019

    Billionaire Owes Writer $650K For Sex Battery, Jury Says

    Billionaire media entrepreneur Alki David committed sexual harassment and sexual battery against a comedy writer, a California jury found Friday, awarding her $650,000 and setting the stage for possible punitive damages.

  • October 11, 2019

    DLA Piper Ousts Bigwig Accused Of Sexual Assault

    DLA Piper cut ties with the co-head of its U.S. emerging growth and venture capital practice Friday, a little over a week after a female partner told the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that he sexually assaulted her and the firm retaliated against her when she complained.  

  • October 11, 2019

    SF Businessman Tied To Giuliani Associates Gets $1M Bond

    A California federal judge set a $1 million bond on Friday for a San Francisco businessman facing charges that he and associates of the president's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani violated campaign finance laws in seeking influence for Ukrainian officials, ordering the man to home detention once he posts the money.

  • October 11, 2019

    9th Circ. Reinstates Suit Over 2 Yosemite Campers' Deaths

    The Ninth Circuit has revived a suit seeking to hold the federal government responsible for the deaths of two teens killed in Yosemite National Park after a tree branch fell on their tent, saying the trial judge erred by tossing the case on sovereign immunity grounds.

  • October 11, 2019

    Battles Over California's Dynamex Law Just Beginning

    Assembly Bill 5, California's new law making it harder for businesses to classify their workers as independent contractors, has garnered a lot of attention for its potential to disrupt the so-called gig economy. But there's an abundance of unanswered questions about how it will change the way businesses operate.

  • October 11, 2019

    J&J Wins Second Asbestos-In-Talc Trial In A Week

    A California jury on Friday cleared Johnson & Johnson of allegations that its talcum powder contained asbestos and caused a man's mesothelioma, the second Golden State jury to find in the company's favor this week.

  • October 11, 2019

    After Mississippi Exit, AGs' T-Mobile Suit May Dwindle

    The coalition of 18 state attorneys general suing to block the Sprint-T-Mobile merger showed signs of splintering when Mississippi departed the lawsuit, raising the possibility that other rural states will also strike deals securing additional mobile coverage commitments and cementing their support for the merger.

  • October 11, 2019

    Calif. Gov. Signs Pro-Worker Laws Banning Forced Arbitration

    California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed sweeping worker-friendly bills into law Thursday, criminalizing mandatory arbitration provisions in workers’ contracts and issuing a wide-ranging set of new legal requirements aimed at combating sexual harassment at work and improving worker conditions and safety.

  • October 11, 2019

    'Horsefeathers!' Pierce Bainbridge Investigator Slams Ex-Atty

    The law firm hired to investigate alleged misconduct by an ex-Pierce Bainbridge partner told a New York trial judge on Friday that it should be excused from the former partner’s wrongful termination lawsuit, sparring with the ejected attorney and drawing a rebuke from the judge.

  • October 11, 2019

    As 'Copyright Troll' Turns National, Will Blowback Follow?

    Richard Liebowitz, an attorney who has filed more than 1,600 copyright lawsuits over the past four years, is quietly spreading his mass litigation operation from New York to the rest of the country — and judges in those other courts are starting to notice.

  • October 11, 2019

    Localities Urge FCC Not To Presume Infrastructure Rates

    The Federal Communications Commission should reject Verizon's attempt to lower what it claims are inflated wireless infrastructure fees in a Nevada county, an array of localities has told the agency, saying that ruling on specific acceptable rates would be an overreach of the commission's authority.

  • October 11, 2019

    Firms Want $2M In Fees For Quantum Accounting Settlement

    Kirby McInerney and Glancy Prongay & Murray asked a California federal court Thursday for roughly $2 million in fees for their efforts securing a tentative $8 million from data storage company Quantum Corp. to resolve a shareholder lawsuit over its accounting practices.

  • October 11, 2019

    US Foods, Disney Object To $135M Deal In Truck Engine Row

    Disney and U.S. Foods are among truck fleet owners objecting to a $135 million settlement between Navistar Inc. and a proposed class of truck buyers, saying the deal is inadequate and unfair because it fails to compensate them for the diminished market value of trucks with defective diesel engines.

  • October 11, 2019

    Stockbridge Drops $104M On Bay Area Apartment Complex

    Real estate investor Stockbridge dropped $103.8 million on a San Jose, California, luxury apartment complex, Jones Lang LaSalle, which helped arrange the deal, said Friday.

  • October 11, 2019

    Calif. 'Grace Period' For Policy Termination Not Retroactive

    A California appeals court ruled Thursday that “grace period” laws requiring life insurers to wait 60 days after a policyholder misses a premium payment before terminating coverage don't apply to policies sold before the statutes took effect in 2013, upholding a jury verdict allowing Protective Life Insurance Co. to cancel a policy issued in 2005.

  • October 11, 2019

    Biotech, Bank Raise Combined $276M In Low-Priced IPOs

    Drug developer Vir Biotechnology Inc. and Chicago-area bank HBT Financial Inc. made their debuts in public markets Friday after raising nearly $276 million combined in initial public offerings that priced at the bottom of their ranges, capping off a mild week for IPOs.

  • October 11, 2019

    EB-5 Scheme Fundraiser To Pay $527K In SEC Deal

    An oil and gas official accused of fundraising for a visa fraud scheme that targeted Chinese citizens interested in obtaining an EB-5 investor visa will pay $527,000 under an agreement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • October 11, 2019

    Tour Buses 'Thumbed Nose' At Health Care Law, SF Says

    San Francisco slapped the operators of the City Sightseeing tour bus service with a lawsuit claiming they refused to shell out health insurance payments for over 200 workers, violating a city law requiring employers to provide affordable health care.

  • October 11, 2019

    'Repugnant' Public Charge Rule Blocked By 3 Judges

    Three federal judges in New York, California and Washington state blocked the Trump administration Friday from enforcing a rule that would penalize immigrants for using public assistance programs, with one judge calling the measure "repugnant."

  • October 10, 2019

    9th Circ. Frees 'Last Resort' Insurer From Medicare Payments

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services can’t seek benefit reimbursements from an insurance guarantee association that administered workers’ compensation policies, the Ninth Circuit ruled Thursday, saying the Medicare statute was not meant to interfere with state laws protecting “last resort” funds that cover insolvent insurers.

  • October 10, 2019

    Newsom OKs Calif.'s First Atty Dues Increase In 20 Years

    California Gov. Gavin Newsom has given the State Bar of California the green light to charge attorneys nearly 30% more — an additional $123 — in licensing dues in 2020, the first increase in more than two decades.

  • October 10, 2019

    Northrop Defends 401(k) As Trial Looms In ERISA Class Action

    Northrop Grumman Corp. is gearing up to stand trial next week on allegations that its 401(k) plan betrayed workers by using a costly management strategy for a risky investment fund, telling a California federal judge that the strategy made sense at the time.

  • October 10, 2019

    Yes, That IS My Song, Zac Brown Tells OneRepublic Singer

    The lead vocalist of pop band OneRepublic has wrongly accused musician Zac Brown of stealing the song “Nowhere Left To Go” for his new solo album “The Controversy,” the Zac Brown Band leader alleged in a lawsuit filed Thursday in California federal court.

  • October 10, 2019

    LA Bar Association Creates Cannabis Section

    The Los Angeles County Bar Association announced it has created a cannabis practice section, which is believed to be the first time a local or county bar in Southern California has a designated section for attorneys working with companies in the booming cannabis industry.

  • October 10, 2019

    Pot Co. Wants $7M Over Crop Lost By Locked Warehouse

    A California cannabis company allegedly changed the locks on a sub-tenant's growing warehouses after a rent dispute and cut its utilities, killing 11,500 square feet of marijuana plants, making off with $1.1 million and leaving behind a mite- and mold-infested ruin, according to a complaint filed in state court.

Expert Analysis

  • How Emotionally Intelligent AI Could Assist With E-Discovery

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    While artificial intelligence has already revolutionized the e-discovery field, the development of emotionally intelligent AI promises to explore data in an even more nuanced and human way, thereby further reducing the burden on legal teams, say Lisa Prowse and Brian Schrader at e-discovery services provider BIA.

  • State Net

    States May Slow Spread Of Vehicle Subscription Services

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    Motor vehicle subscription services — similar to auto leases, except with no long-term commitment, the ability to change vehicles periodically, and insurance and maintenance bundled in — have been embraced by some automakers, insurers and consumers, but face potential roadblocks from state lawmakers and regulators, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Returns Stability To Joint Employer Test

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    By applying a traditional control-type test to hold that McDonald’s was not a joint employer of its franchisee’s employees, the Ninth Circuit last week in Salazar v. McDonald’s injected a welcome dose of clarity and common sense into a volatile area of law, say Andrew Murphy and Lauren Linderman at FaegreBD.

  • Preventable Risks Your Law Firm May Be Overlooking

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    Although most lawyers are well-prepared to defend or justify the value of an insurance claim for clients, often law firms have not clearly identified their own potential liabilities, planned for adequate insurance or established prudent internal risk management practices, says Victor Sordillo at Sompo International.

  • Data Privacy Compliance Best Practices For Asset Managers

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    An asset manager can more nimbly engage with the nuances of new data privacy legislation by following a best practices model, developed through universal protocols, that can more readily be adapted to comply with a variety of laws, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • 6 Ethics Tips For Attorneys Making Lateral Transfers

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    With lateral transfers between law firms on the rise, it is more important than ever for partners to understand the steps they must take to adhere to ethics rules and other requirements when making a transition, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Competing Refusal-To-Deal Tests At 7th, 9th Circs.

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    The Viamedia and Qualcomm antitrust cases in the Seventh and Ninth Circuits, in which the U.S. Department of Justice has taken positions regarding when a refusal to deal could be unlawful, may lead the U.S. Supreme Court to clarify the appropriate standard for refusal to deal claims, says Ryan Sandrock of Sidley.

  • High Court's Knick Ruling May Hinder Calif. Public Agencies

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Knick v. Scott allowing plaintiffs to file takings and inverse condemnation lawsuits in federal court may mean that California landowners no longer need to exhaust judicial remedies first, possibly discouraging public agencies from undertaking legal actions, says Gene Tanaka of Best Best.

  • Options For Calif. Franchisors After New Contractor Standards

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    Recent judicial and legislative developments in California that make it harder to classify workers as independent contractors have left franchisors with lots of questions, but some safeguards may lessen the risk of liability when franchisees fail to comply with labor laws, say Jonathan Solish and Glenn Plattner at Bryan Cave.

  • Calif. Ruling May Curb Aggressive Foreign LLC Taxation

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    When the California Office of Tax Appeals decision in Jali becomes precedential, it will likely marginalize the relevance of the controversial Franchise Tax Board rulings, which attempted to justify assertion of taxable nexus over out-of-state members of California limited liability companies, say Tim Gustafson and Peter Hull of Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Direct Taxes: The Next Shoe To Drop After Wayfair?

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    Taxpayers should be alarmed at state efforts to extend the U.S. Supreme Court's Wayfair decision to direct taxes — including gross receipts, income and franchise taxes — despite the apparent protections of federal Public Law 86-272, says Martin Eisenstein of Brann & Isaacson.

  • State Net

    Battles Still Rage Over Calif. Data, Worker Classification Laws

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    California is set to be reshaped soon by two pieces of legislation — one on data privacy, and one on worker classification — but numerous attempts by lawmakers to amend both laws, and the possibility of ballot measures that may further alter them, are clouding the picture, says Rich Ehisen of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Calif. Funds Wildfire Liabilities Without Punishing Ratepayers

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    A recently enacted California law that sets aside $21 billion to cover future wildfire damage claims and incentivizes safer electric utility infrastructure represents a successful attempt to balance competing interests, while putting wildfire claims funding on a firmer footing, says Allan Marks of Milbank.

  • EPA Misses The Irony In Its Calif. Emissions Waiver Rollback

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler criticized California's poor air quality when he withdrew the state's waiver to regulate vehicle emissions more stringently than the EPA. But California's air pollution problem was precisely the reason Congress provided for such waivers in the first place, says Seth Jaffe of Foley Hoag.

  • California Tax Takes: Unclaimed Property Amnesty May Return

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    Among several important California tax developments this month is a budget bill section, which could ultimately provide immunity for businesses that may want to disclose potential unclaimed property but have been reluctant to do so under California’s onerous penalty provisions, say attorneys at Reed Smith.