California

  • January 23, 2020

    Katten, Recruiter Settle Dallas Placement Fee Dispute

    Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP has settled claims with Los Angeles-based legal recruiting firm Kossoris Search Inc. in a dispute over Katten's alleged failure to pay a placement fee after hiring a group of partners Kossoris identified to launch a new Dallas office, court records show.

  • January 23, 2020

    Chubb Unit Sues Insurers Over $1M Construction Defense Bill

    Chubb unit Ace American Insurance Co. sued a group of other insurers in California federal court on Wednesday over a San Francisco hotel construction project gone wrong.

  • January 23, 2020

    McKesson, Stockholders Reach $175M Deal In Opioid Suit

    Stockholders suing pharmaceutical distributor McKesson Corp. told a Delaware Chancery Court judge Thursday they had reached a $175 million settlement to resolve claims the company’s board failed in its oversight of opioid sales even after incurring millions in fines for previous compliance failures.

  • January 23, 2020

    Calif. Appeals Court Won't Revive J&J Talc Suit

    A California appeals panel on Wednesday upheld the dismissal of a suit claiming that asbestos in Johnson & Johnson talc-based powder products caused a woman's mesothelioma, saying there was no expert testimony presented to counter an opinion that the talc was free of asbestos.

  • January 23, 2020

    Breaking Down Michael Avenatti's Nike Extortion Trial

    Once plastered all over cable news screens, Michael Avenatti will soon be making his first of several planned appearances before a different audience: federal jurors. The embattled attorney and former Trump sparring partner will be facing an uphill battle next week in New York as he fights charges that he tried to extort millions of dollars from Nike.

  • January 23, 2020

    Google And Amazon Accused Of Selling Pirated Recordings

    Google and Amazon are selling bootlegged copies of recordings by “virtually every well-known recording artist from the 1930s through the 1960s,” including Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald, side-by-side with legal recordings from legitimate record labels, according to six lawsuits filed this week in California and Washington federal courts.

  • January 23, 2020

    Sheppard Mullin Nabs Wind, Solar Energy Whiz In LA

    Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP has landed a renewable energy deals expert from Crowell & Moring LLP, bringing on a partner who has spent decades bringing some of the country's largest wind and solar energy projects to fruition.

  • January 23, 2020

    California Bar Mulls Licensing Nonlawyer Professionals

    California State Bar leaders took another step Thursday toward opening up the regulation of legal services in the state, launching the assembly of a task force to explore a licensing scheme under which paraprofessionals would provide certain legal services and advice to consumers.

  • January 23, 2020

    Union Pacific Preserves Win In Suit Over Calif. Teen's Death

    A California state appeals court has cleared Union Pacific Railroad Co. in a suit blaming it for causing the death of a teen hit by a train at a railway crossing, saying the railroad did not own or manage the crossing and its employees were not negligent.

  • January 23, 2020

    AGs Tell Justices Not To Scrap CFPB Over Removal Provision

    Nearly two dozen state attorneys general have told the U.S. Supreme Court that nixing a structural element of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau doesn’t also require invalidating the agency entirely or related provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act, as a California law firm has asserted in its constitutional challenge to the agency.

  • January 23, 2020

    4 Takeaways From Roundup Jury Selection In St. Louis

    Monsanto and the four people alleging its Roundup weedkiller gave them cancer seated 16 jurors Wednesday. They'll hear the first trial outside California, where the agricultural giant has lost three verdicts. Law360 looks into what can be gleaned from two days of voir dire.

  • January 23, 2020

    Music Rights Group Fights Broadcaster Brief In Antitrust Row

    Global Music Rights LLC has blasted a bid from a broadcasters’ trade association to wade into its suit accusing a radio station organization of demanding anti-competitive licensing rates, saying the trade group is a friend of a party, not of the court.

  • January 23, 2020

    Tribal Co. Deserves Same Exemption As Tribe, 9th Circ. Told

    A tribal business entity should enjoy the same exemption from California excise tax that is afforded to tribes themselves, a Native American cigarette company has told the Ninth Circuit.

  • January 23, 2020

    DeVos Wants Boosted Contempt Bid Squashed

    The U.S. Department of Education has asked a California federal court not to jack up the $100,000 sanction it slapped Education Secretary Betsy DeVos with last year after her department violated a court order by billing thousands of students with loans tied to the disgraced and defunct Corinthian Colleges.

  • January 23, 2020

    AT&T Says $1.8M Crypto Theft Claims Have 'Critical Holes'

    AT&T is defending its motion to dismiss claims that it failed to prevent the theft of $1.8 million in cryptocurrency, telling a California federal court that a technology consultant's arguments contain "critical holes" that sink his complaint.

  • January 23, 2020

    SanDisk Gets Memory Card Labeling Suit Wiped In Calif.

    A California federal judge on Wednesday dismissed a proposed class action alleging SanDisk LLC misled consumers about the storage capacity of its flash drives and memory cards, noting that the back of the packages on the products at issue clarifies the number of storage bytes.

  • January 23, 2020

    MoFo Adds Venable Trial Atty In San Francisco

    Morrison & Foerster LLP announced Wednesday that it is growing its class actions and mass torts group in San Francisco, bringing on a Venable LLP trial attorney known for her work in product liability and intellectual property cases.

  • January 23, 2020

    States, ABA Urge High Court To Affirm Migrant Habeas Review

    A coalition of 20 attorneys general and the American Bar Association told the U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday that expedited removal of migrants fails to sufficiently safeguard against erroneous deportations, weighing in on a fight over court authority to review whether asylum-seekers credibly fear persecution.

  • January 23, 2020

    9th Circ. Upholds FCC's Bid To Speed Copper Retirement

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Thursday negated an attempt by public advocacy organizations to challenge a Federal Communications Commission rule that sped the transition from copper to fiber networks, finding the groups weren’t directly connected to the matter.

  • January 23, 2020

    Immigration Attys Tell Justices Law Criminalizes Good Advice

    Giving accurate and ethical legal advice should not be a crime, immigration attorneys have told the U.S. Supreme Court in a case challenging a statute that makes it a felony to encourage unauthorized immigrants to remain in the country.

  • January 23, 2020

    Tribe Urges 9th Circ. To Revive Gambling Compact Suit

    A Native American tribe is asking the Ninth Circuit to reverse a lower court ruling that California acted in good faith during negotiations over a gambling compact, saying talks broke down because the state was unwilling to discuss compact changes.

  • January 23, 2020

    Raley's Inks $2.8M Deal To End Pregnancy Bias Suit

    The Raley's supermarket chain has agreed to pony up $2.8 million to settle a California state court suit that claimed the company forced workers into taking unpaid absences after becoming pregnant.

  • January 23, 2020

    Wells Fargo Ex-CEO Fined $17.5M For Role In Sales Scandal

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency said Thursday that it is bringing enforcement actions against five former Wells Fargo executives and has reached settlements with three others over their alleged roles in the bank's sales practices scandal, including a $17.5 million fine for former CEO John Stumpf.

  • January 23, 2020

    Xerox Preps Slate Of 11 HP Nominees In $33B Takeover Push

    Xerox said Thursday it plans to nominate a slate of 11 independent directors to HP’s board, as the print and digital products company looks to advance its spurned $33 billion cash-and-stock buyout offer for HP. 

  • January 22, 2020

    Ex-Jawbone Worker Stole IP Before Joining Fitbit, Jury Told

    Prosecutors told a California federal jury during openings of a trade secret trial Wednesday that Jawbone's ex-consumer experience director stole studies that were its "crown jewels" before taking a job at rival Fitbit, while her attorney argued she simply forgot she'd backed up the data onto her personal "cloud" account.

Expert Analysis

  • Legal Lessons From Esports Sponsorship Deals

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    Riot Games’ recent global partnerships with Louis Vuitton, OPPO and Red Bull may provide a potential template for other companies, leagues and players seeking to form similar agreements, and they should serve as a reminder of how carefully constructed such deals will need to be, say James Chang at Pillsbury and Sean Gilbert and Neil Thakur at Teknos Associates.

  • Nissan Ex-CEO Illustrates Do's And Don'ts Of Image Repair

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    Lawyers can draw a number of useful lessons about reputation management from the efforts of former Nissan executive Carlos Ghosn — who recently escaped house arrest in Tokyo — to restore his sullied reputation, says Elizabeth Ortega at ECO Strategic Communications.

  • The Int'l, Federal And State Taxation Forecast For 2020

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    Attorneys at Steptoe & Johnson look at U.S. international, federal and state taxation, including legislative, regulatory and controversy developments expected in 2020.

  • #MeToo Is Much More Than Last Year's News

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    Employers wondering whether #MeToo is still relevant should recognize that it is a continuous equity movement that includes pay, diversity and inclusion efforts at both the worker and executive levels, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

  • Board Composition Leads 2020 Corporate Governance Issues

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    This year corporate board nominating and governance committees may face increased pressure as investor demands focus on issues such as the number of corporate boards on which directors serve, board refreshment and diversity, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Key Trends In Energy Antitrust Enforcement And Litigation

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    Antitrust agencies and private litigants continued to focus on the energy industry in 2019, and new antitrust policy initiatives announced by the U.S. Department of Justice last year will offer energy companies opportunities to avoid prosecution in certain cases, say attorneys at Vinson & Elkins.

  • Litigating FRAND Rates After Fed. Circ. Ericsson Decision

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    After the Federal Circuit’s recent ruling in TCL v. Ericsson, which puts juries at the helm of calculating FRAND damages for standard-essential patents, litigators should focus on preparing a simplified and emotionally persuasive story and garnering the evidentiary support necessary for a favorable appeal, says Larry Sandell of Mei & Mark.

  • State Net

    Obamacare Clings To Life As States Expand Medicaid

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    While the Affordable Care Act faces new court challenges, the public's growing support for the law and states' increasing interest in its Medicaid expansion option suggest it may have political staying power, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Calif. Ruling Clears Up Pay Stub Rules For Company Names

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    A California appellate court recently ruled in Noori v. Countrywide Payroll that use of an unregistered acronym on wage statements violated the state’s Labor Code, providing guidance on the requirement that pay stubs include an employer’s legal name, says Kirsten Gallacher at Wilson Turner.

  • SG Argument Likely Dooms Ariz. Tax Case At High Court

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    In Arizona's case challenging California's doing business tax, the solicitor general's recently filed amicus brief arguing that Arizona's constitutional challenge does not warrant the U.S. Supreme Court’s exercise of its original jurisdiction may signal the end of Arizona's attempt to bypass state court, say Robert Merten and Mike Le at Pillsbury.

  • Bias Case Gives Justices Chance To Rethink Title VII

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    If the U.S. Supreme Court decides to hear Peterson v. Linear Controls, its decision could resolve a circuit split and redefine the scope of Title VII's discrimination protections, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Top 10 Employment Law Developments Of The Decade: Part 2

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    In the final part of this article, Barbara Roth and Tyler Hendry at Herbert Smith look back on the most significant labor and employment law updates from the second half of the decade, and reveal their choice for the most important change of the 2010s.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • The New Class Action Frontier Under Illinois Privacy Law

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    One year after a pivotal Illinois Supreme Court ruling broadened liability under the Biometric Information Privacy Act, companies in a wide variety of industries need to be vigilant of a rise in potentially financially ruinous class action filings, and there are several steps they can take to protect themselves from BIPA liability, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Where The Fight Over FTC's Enforcement Authority Stands

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    A flurry of year-end activity, including three petitions before the U.S. Supreme Court and a spate of proposed legislation, requires a recap on the current status of the debate over the Federal Trade Commission's Section 13(b) authority to obtain permanent injunctions and restitution, say John Villafranco and Khoury DiPrima of Kelley Drye.