Class Action

  • February 11, 2020

    T-Mobile Can't Hang Up On Fake Ringtone Suit, Ill. Court Told

    Local carriers are fighting back against T-Mobile’s attempt to dip out of a suit accusing it of using fake ringtones to trick customers into thinking dropped calls were the carriers' fault, telling an Illinois federal judge that they have more than proved their suspicions.

  • February 11, 2020

    PSEG Hit With NJ Suit Over Unwanted Telemarketing Calls

    Public Service Enterprise Group Inc. was smacked Tuesday with a proposed class action in New Jersey federal court alleging that the energy company made prerecorded telemarketing calls to thousands of consumers' cellphones without their prior consent, in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

  • February 11, 2020

    Silver Co. Agrees To $41.5M Settlement In Tax Dispute

    A Canadian silver firm accused of hiding a $207 million tax charge from investors who filed a class action against it has asked a California federal court to enter a $41.5 million settlement in the case, according to recent court documents.

  • February 11, 2020

    Ga. City Joins Chorus Decrying Skyrocketing Baby Med Price

    The city of Marietta, Georgia, is the latest to file suit over the sky-high pricing of an infant seizure medication that has triggered no fewer than three other class action complaints across the country.

  • February 11, 2020

    Settlement Over Highmark Small-Group Plans Gets First OK

    A $7.5 million settlement over insurer Highmark Inc.'s alleged collusion with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center to drive out competitors received preliminary approval Tuesday from a Pennsylvania federal judge.

  • February 11, 2020

    Ford Dodges Couple's Shattering Sunroof Defect Suit

    A Washington federal judge on Tuesday told a couple suing Ford Motor Co. to hit the road, ruling they hadn’t shown that an alleged defect in Ford Escape vehicles that causes the sunroofs to shatter would have been material to buyers.

  • February 11, 2020

    FedEx Says Drivers' Firm Has Conflict In Wage Suit

    FedEx has urged a Pennsylvania federal court to disqualify Lichten & Liss-Riordan PC from representing drivers in a wage dispute, arguing that in a separate case, the firm is counseling service providers whose interests are opposed to the drivers'.

  • February 11, 2020

    Saxena White, Bernstein Litowitz Seek Lead In Med Co. Suit

    Saxena White PA and Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossman LLP are vying for the co-lead counsel role in California federal court in a proposed shareholder class action accusing medical device manufacturer Merit Medical Systems Inc. of misrepresenting its success in integrating new acquisitions.

  • February 11, 2020

    California's Private AG Law Reportedly Netted $88M In 2019

    Employers paid out more than $88 million last year in disputes brought through California’s Private Attorneys General Act, University of California, Los Angeles scholars and others said Tuesday in a report that makes a case for other states to adopt similar measures.

  • February 11, 2020

    Ex-Google Exec's Co. To Pay $18.5M To End Payday Loan Suit

    A former Google executive's financial technology company and a tribal corporation will pay $18.5 million and cancel $170 million of outstanding debt to end proposed class litigation alleging they saddled consumers with payday loans carrying exorbitant interest rates.

  • February 11, 2020

    Rockwell Can't Dodge Pension Suit Over Old Mortality Table

    A Wisconsin federal judge has refused to let Rockwell Automation Inc. off the hook in an ERISA suit claiming it wrongly used an outdated mortality table in its pension calculations, unswayed by the company's claim that the decades-old mortality table was OK because it was valid when adopted by the plan.

  • February 11, 2020

    Shutterfly Seeks To Exit Investors' Suit Over $2.7B Deal

    Shutterfly Inc. on Monday asked a Delaware federal judge to toss a proposed class action alleging the company withheld information regarding its $2.7 billion acquisition by private equity giant Apollo Global Management Inc., saying the suit misrepresents public disclosures made about the deal.

  • February 11, 2020

    Diagnostic Co. Investors Try To Seal $2.1M Stock-Drop Deal

    Investors in Meridian Bioscience Inc. on Monday asked an Ohio federal judge for approval of a $2.1 million settlement that resolves their claims that some of the company's medical diagnostic kits lowballed users' blood lead levels, which they claim caused the company's stock price to plunge when those details became public.

  • February 11, 2020

    Cemex Dumps Investor Suit Over Bribery For Good

    Global building materials company Cemex permanently escaped a proposed securities class action accusing it of covering up a bribery scheme when a New York federal judge found Monday that the shareholders hadn't presented any new facts since an earlier version of the suit was tossed last year.

  • February 11, 2020

    Parent Claims Baby Brezza Formula Mixer Is Defective

    A New York parent is suing Baby Brezza Enterprises LLC and its parent company in the state’s Supreme Court, saying the automatic mixer it makes and sells fails to live up to its promise of mixing the correct amount of baby formula, leaving infants undernourished.

  • February 11, 2020

    Fatburger Parent Co. Slams Shareholders' Class Cert. Bid

    Investors in Fatburger’s parent company shouldn’t be allowed to proceed as a class in their suit alleging FAT Brands Inc. misled them in its initial public offering disclosures, since they haven’t shown none of them knew about previous Fatburger bankruptcies, FAT Brands told a California federal court on Monday.

  • February 11, 2020

    Televisa Slams Investors' Cert. Bid In FIFA Bribe Suit

    Mexican media company Televisa Group is urging a New York federal court to shoot down a bid by its investors to certify a class in a stock drop suit related to allegations that Televisa bribed FIFA officials for broadcast rights, saying the proposed class’s own data shows that the revelation of Televisa’s alleged role in the scandal didn’t affect stock prices at all.

  • February 11, 2020

    SeaWorld Settles 'Blackfish' Litigation For $65M

    SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. has settled a securities class action and derivative litigation related to the controversial 2013 documentary “Blackfish” for $65 million, according to a Tuesday regulatory filing.

  • February 10, 2020

    Monsanto Looks To Sink Farmer's Trial Over Dicamba Drift

    Monsanto asked a Missouri federal court on Friday to bar punitive damages and to enter a win for the company in an ongoing trial over a peach farm's claims that pesticides drifting from nearby fields of crops resistant to the weedkiller dicamba decimated his land.

  • February 10, 2020

    Alsup Blasts DoorDash's 'Hypocrisy,' Orders 5K Arbitrations

    U.S. District Judge William Alsup on Monday ordered DoorDash to individually arbitrate employment misclassification claims brought by more than 5,000 food couriers, denying its request to pause the proceedings and slamming the company's "hypocrisy" in requiring workers to sign arbitration agreements and then seeking classwide litigation.

  • February 10, 2020

    Pot Farm, Staffing Co. Say FLSA Suit Can't Name Them Both

    Cannabis companies Pura Cali and Loud Buddha have asked a California federal judge to throw out a class action filed by workers who say they were shorted wages and denied breaks, arguing the proposed class can't cover workers at both companies.

  • February 10, 2020

    3M Workers' Cert. Bid Faces Questions Over Class Rep

    A California federal judge considering a class certification bid in a suit alleging 3M Co. shorted workers on breaks and wages expressed concerns about the named plaintiff's adequacy as the class representative, saying on Monday the plaintiff doesn't seem familiar with the claims in the suit.

  • February 10, 2020

    Roche Cyrulnik, Kirby, Robbins Geller Vie To Lead Bitcoin Suit

    Three sets of law firms are seeking to be interim class counsel in a bitcoin market manipulation case against Bitfinex and Tether that, by one account, could be worth up to $1.4 trillion in damages, with Roche Cyrulnik Freedman LLP, Kirby McInerney LLP and Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP reiterating why they are each best placed to litigate the claims.

  • February 10, 2020

    Facebook Users Ink Data Breach Deal Seeking $16M In Fees

    Attorneys representing a group of Facebook users are seeking $16 million in fees as part of a deal aimed at resolving claims that the social media giant's negligent security practices led to a data breach that affected 29 million users, according to California federal court filings.

  • February 10, 2020

    Bayer Wants $87M Roundup Cancer Trial Award Overturned

    Monsanto asked a California state appeals court to reverse a nearly $87 million award for a couple who claimed glyphosate in Roundup weedkiller gave them cancer, saying the outcome squares with neither law nor science and was tainted by "egregious attorney misconduct."

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    States Should Not Follow ABA On Attorney Conduct Rules

    Author Photo

    Because the American Bar Association's new rule on diversity continues to use the Model Rules of Professional Conduct as a cultural bludgeon, states should create independent codes limited to constitutionally valid purposes of attorney regulation, says Bradley Abramson of Alliance Defending Freedom.

  • How Courts And Litigants Can Benefit From Special Masters

    Author Photo

    As we approach the first anniversary of the American Bar Association's adoption of guidelines for the appointment and use of special masters in civil litigation, retired U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin, now at Stroock, explains how special masters can help parties and courts with faster decision-making and subject matter expertise.

  • Uber Policy Calls For Refresher On ABA Confidentiality Rules

    Author Photo

    Uber's recent policy update allowing drivers to audio-record passenger rides is a reminder for lawyers to observe the highest standard of care in protecting client information under the American Bar Association's confidentiality model rule, says Paul Boehm at Williams & Connolly.

  • 4 Simple Rules For Witness Note Taking

    Author Photo

    Witness notes that form the center of a plaintiff’s case have largely been replaced by digital systems, but they remain on defense counsel’s radar, and with proper safeguards can be a witness's best friend, says Matthew Keenan at Shook Hardy.

  • Class Cert. In 11th Circ. Supplement Case Comes With Limits

    Author Photo

    The Eleventh Circuit recently certified a class of dietary supplement purchasers in Debernardis v. IQ Formulations, but the decision reflects skepticism that consumers alleging economic harm will be able to prove that they were damaged by buying a product that did not cause physical harm, say Kamryn Deegan and Thomas Curvin of Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Opinion

    2 Overlooked Advantages Of Hourly Fees

    Author Photo

    Alternative-fee disputes like Bartlit Beck v. Okada in Illinois federal court may tell us something about the reasons for the continued vitality of the hourly fee, especially among clients who have the wherewithal to pay, says attorney J.B. Heaton.

  • Lessons For MLP Conflict Transactions From 2 Del. Cases

    Author Photo

    Two recent decisions by the Delaware Court of Chancery highlight the potential risks and uncertainties in master limited partnership conflict litigation, say Christopher Kelly and Jaclyn Levy of Potter Anderson.  

  • TCPA Class Actions Will Continue To Target Energy Industry

    Author Photo

    Over the last three years, energy companies have been identified in many Telephone Consumer Protection Act class actions, and despite Federal Communications Commission guidance, the industry can expect to face more challenges, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • A Lower Bar To Prove Market Efficiency In Securities Cases

    Author Photo

    Several federal courts' recent securities fraud decisions have reaffirmed that a 95% confidence level is not necessary in all instances of measuring stock price reactions, and is inconsistent with the preponderance of the evidence standard in civil actions, say John Esmay and Philip Leggio at Labaton Sucharow.

  • The Top 10 TCPA Cases Of 2019

    Author Photo

    Over the last year, industry groups have continued to challenge several aspects of the Federal Communications Commission’s interpretation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, and courts have taken steps to limit the statute’s reach, say attorneys at Troutman Sanders.

  • 2020 May Be The Year Of The Great CBD Market Correction

    Author Photo

    A recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory warning of potentially serious side effects of CBD, coupled with calls for guidance from state enforcement agencies, should dispel any hope that the FDA would take a light approach to industry regulation heading into 2020, says Joshua Mandell at Akerman.

  • 5 Things To Watch In Litigation Finance This Year

    Author Photo

    As 2020 arrives, we may see new products and initiatives in litigation finance that we can’t imagine yet, but one thing is clear — this industry is well past its earliest stage and is entering a very active growth spurt, says Ralph Sutton of Validity Finance.

  • Hottest Legal Industry Guest Topics Of 2019

    Author Photo

    This year guest contributors discussed tips for lawyers combating burnout and dealing with narcissists, how millennials are changing law firm culture, BigLaw’s move toward plaintiff-side litigation and other legal industry trends.

  • The Role Of Litigation Finance In The Next Recession

    Author Photo

    If it is true that litigation did not increase during the Great Recession because corporations feared losing lawsuits and money, then litigation finance could provide the final puzzle piece necessary to spur litigation demand in the next recession, says Therium CEO Eric Blinderman.

  • Fans Must Manage Expectations After 9th Circ. Pacquiao Case

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in Pacquiao-Mayweather affirms that sports fans have no right to a certain quality of performance and is rooted in both legal precedent and common sense, say Gregory Smith and Sam Fogas of The Maloney Firm.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Class Action archive.