Colorado

  • March 25, 2024

    Amgen Sues Colorado After Drug's 'Unaffordable' Rating

    Amgen has sued the Colorado Prescription Drug Affordability Review Board in federal court after receiving a determination that one of its arthritis drugs is "unaffordable," saying the board is using unconstitutionally "unguided discretion" to impose arbitrary price controls on patent-protected drugs.

  • March 25, 2024

    Colo. Justices Say Insurer's Vintage Car Exclusion Holds Up

    Colorado's justices on Monday ruled that specialty insurance policies for vintage cars can limit uninsured motorist coverage when they work "in tandem" with a policy for a regular-use vehicle, with the court finding that antique car policies warrant "different treatment."

  • March 25, 2024

    Kroger Says Sweetened Merger Deal Will Sink Antitrust Doubts

    Kroger told a Colorado state judge Monday that it plans to "enhance" its $24.6 billion Albertson's merger to satisfy federal and state regulators, a plan it did not yet describe in detail and that Colorado said it has not seen.

  • March 25, 2024

    OSU, WSU Finalize $65M Deal With Departing Pac-12 Schools

    Oregon State University and Washington State University finalized the terms of their settlement with the departing members of the Pac-12 conference Monday, splitting $65 million in fees and securing additional protections for their slimmed-down partnership.

  • March 22, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Abortion, Jury Trials And Estate Tax

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments this week over the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's decision expanding access to popular abortion pill mifepristone as well as whether juries should determine a defendants' eligibility for repeat offender enhanced sentencing under the Armed Career Criminal Act and how long federal employees have to appeal adverse employment decisions.

  • March 22, 2024

    Colo. City Wins $13.5M For Software Co.'s Trickery

    A Colorado federal judge says a software company that was found to have lied to secure a multimillion project with the city of Fort Collins must pay $13.5 million for the city's costs stemming from its fraud.

  • March 22, 2024

    Foley Hoag Adds Employment Atty To Denver Office

    A former Sherman & Howard LLC attorney advising employers on union organizing campaigns, collective bargaining and unfair labor practice cases is now a Foley Hoag LLP partner in Denver, the firm announced, where he will bring 20-plus years of experience in private practice and as an NLRB attorney.

  • March 22, 2024

    Radiology Co., Trustee Must Face Ex-Worker's ESOP Suit

    A Colorado federal judge refused to toss a proposed class action accusing a radiology company and its trustee of overcharging the company's employee stock ownership plan in a $163.7 million sale, saying the former workers' complaint puts forward enough details to back up their allegations.

  • March 22, 2024

    Pot Co. Investor Gets Colo. Contract Breach Suit Revived

    A Colorado appeals court has revived an investor's suit alleging that the head of a six-company cannabis enterprise failed to pay out as agreed, finding the trial court was wrong to find the investor did not have a legally protected interest in the enterprise.

  • March 22, 2024

    Colo. Water District Illegally Doubled Tax Rate, Panel Says

    A water conservancy district violated the Colorado Constitution when it doubled its property tax rate without voter approval, a state appeals court ruled, reversing a lower court's decision against a proposed class of property owners.

  • March 22, 2024

    Colo. Mandates Multistate Online Insurance Tax Filing

    Insurance companies in Colorado will be required to pay certain taxes through multistate third-party web-based application under legislation that Democratic Gov. Jared Polis signed into law Friday.

  • March 22, 2024

    Walmart OT Suit 'Just Barely' Gets Collective Cert.

    Workers claiming that Walmart and a related entity misclassified them as salaried employees exempt from overtime "just barely" met the requirements to move forward as a collective, a Colorado federal judge ruled Friday.

  • March 22, 2024

    Colo. Foreign Students Not Residents, Tax Dept. Says

    A foreign student, intern or trainee temporarily in Colorado would not be considered domiciled in Colorado under the state's six-month rule and would not need to pay the state's income tax, the state tax department said.

  • March 22, 2024

    Colo. Geothermal Startup, Directors Settle Ownership Spat

    A Colorado-based geothermal energy startup and its partners have told a federal judge they are finalizing a settlement to end more than a year of bitter litigation over ownership of the company.

  • March 21, 2024

    Colo. Distributor Seeks $2.3M Sanction For Stryker Spoilation

    A Colorado medical device distributor urged a federal judge to make Stryker and its lawyers pay $2.3 million in attorney fees as sanctions for "pervasive misconduct" throughout discovery and trial, arguing discovery violations will otherwise become the "cost of doing business" for the medical technology giant.

  • March 21, 2024

    10th Circ. Doubts Officers Can Get Redo In Training Attack

    A Tenth Circuit panel was skeptical Thursday that tactical officers at a Colorado supermax prison can challenge a trial court's decision not to hold an evidentiary hearing in a suit about a training exercise that turned violent, with one judge noting that the officers did not object at the time.

  • March 21, 2024

    Chief Of Bogus PE Firm Gets 6 Years For $10M Affinity Fraud

    The Colorado-based CEO of a purported investment firm faces nearly six years in prison after pleading guilty to securities fraud in connection with a $10.4 million scheme targeting West Point grads and involving claims he planned to invest in a trio of Italian cycling companies.

  • March 21, 2024

    Developer Says Partner Mishandled Funds In Denver Project

    A real estate developer and a related online platform have accused a hedge fund in Colorado state court of misusing grant money and owing fees for a Denver commercial housing project.

  • March 21, 2024

    AGs Urge Congress To Address Hemp Intoxicants In Farm Bill

    A bipartisan coalition of 21 attorneys general is urging Congress to address what the state officials call a public health and safety crisis by amending federal hemp policy to clarify that intoxicating products derived from hemp extracts are not legal under federal law.

  • March 21, 2024

    NY Disbars 'Copyright Troll' Atty For Ignoring Orders, Lying

    A suspended New York attorney who became known as a "copyright troll" has been disbarred, with a state appeals court concluding that a long pattern of noncompliance with court orders and making false representations during cases merits the punishment.

  • March 21, 2024

    Judge In Blackstone Lease Row Wants Colo. Justices' Input

    A Colorado federal judge has said he would like to have the state Supreme Court answer key questions in a putative class action against Blackstone subsidiaries, writing that tenants' claims alleging the companies' lease agreements violate state law present novel legal issues with little case law to provide guidance.

  • March 21, 2024

    New Suit Aims To Block Immigration Fee Hikes

    The Biden administration is facing a new lawsuit over its controversial immigration fee increases for employers, with an immigrant investor, an investors' advocacy group and a technology trade group alleging the administration failed to adequately justify the fee hikes.

  • March 21, 2024

    Colo. Cannabis Dispensary Hit With Wage Theft Class Action

    A former hourly worker for a Colorado-based cannabis dispensary said the company failed to provide employees with mandatory meal and rest breaks or compensate them for those missed breaks, according to a proposed class action in Colorado state court.

  • March 21, 2024

    Robins Kaplan, Colo. Firm Beat Malpractice Claim

    A Colorado appeals courts determined Thursday a state trial court was right to rule in favor of Robins Kaplan LLP and a Colorado firm in a 2020 malpractice suit after the lower court found it could not be proven that attorney negligence caused a worse outcome for the firms' client.

  • March 20, 2024

    Justices Ask How Texas, NM Can Cut Water Deal Without Feds

    U.S. Supreme Court justices on Wednesday questioned whether Texas, New Mexico and Colorado can settle their dispute over Rio Grande water rights without the approval of the federal government — which is arguing the deal could leave the water systems in those states high and dry.

Expert Analysis

  • Colorado Antitrust Reform Carries Broad State Impact

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    Colorado recently became the latest state to update and expand its antitrust laws, and the new act may significantly affect enforcement and private litigation, particularly when it comes to workers and consumers, says Diane Hazel at Foley & Lardner.

  • Regulating AI: Litigation Questions And State Efforts To Watch

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    In view of the developing legal and regulatory framework for artificial intelligence systems in the U.S., including state legislation and early federal litigation, there are practical takeaways as we look toward the future, says Jennifer Maisel at Rothwell Figg.

  • The Issues Brewing Around Starbucks Labor Practice Cases

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    Starbucks is faced with fighting off another push for a nationwide injunction against firing any employees that support unionization, and there's a distinct possibility that the company and the National Labor Relations Board could be fighting the same fight over and over in various locations, says Janette Levey at Levey Law.

  • High Court's Tribal Water Rights Ruling Steadies The Boat

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Arizona v. Navajo Nation — concerning the federal government's obligations to help secure tribal access to water — overturns a Ninth Circuit decision that could have undermined existing state adjudication processes and unleashed a wave of tribal water rights claims, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • Colo. Eviction Case Could Transform Tenant Rights

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    The Colorado Supreme Court recently granted certiorari in a case that could open the door for tenants to assert allegations of discrimination and retaliation during eviction proceedings, and dramatically prolong the state's process, says Jacob Hollars at Spencer Fane.

  • Pitfalls Of Attorney AI Use In Brief Prep Has Judges On Alert

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    Some lawyers are attempting to leverage generative artificial intelligence as a brief drafting tool, which may serve to greatly reduce the burden of motion practice, but several recent cases show that generative AI is not perfect and blind reliance on this tool can be very risky, say Matthew Nigriny and John Gary Maynard at Hunton.

  • High Court Ruling Boosts New York Times v. Sullivan Vitality

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Counterman v. Colorado, that the First Amendment requires a recklessness standard for true threats prosecutions, shows that an outright overruling of New York Times v. Sullivan is now unlikely despite prior dissenting opinions urging the court to revisit its actual malice standard, say attorneys at Davis Wright.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • Employer Drug-Testing Policies Must Evolve With State Law

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    As multistate employers face ongoing challenges in drafting consistent marijuana testing policies due to the evolving patchwork of state laws, they should note some emerging patterns among local and state statutes to ensure compliance in different jurisdictions, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • The Supreme Court Is At War With Itself On Extraterritoriality

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently issued two conflicting pronouncements about the presumption against extraterritoriality without acknowledging the tensions between these decisions, which leaves lower courts, practitioners and potential defendants in the dark, says Jonah Knobler at Patterson Belknap.

  • Blunders That Made 'Bakked' Cannabis TM Go Up In Smoke

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    The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board’s recent denial of National Concessions Group’s application to register the mark “BAKKED” illustrates mistakes that cannabis companies must be wary of in pursuing federal registration as examiners may look beyond the four corners of an application, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

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