Competition

  • February 16, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen a legal battle erupt between JPMorgan and the founder of a Greek payments company following a dispute over the valuation of their jointly owned fintech business, the children of late Russian oligarch Vladimir Scherbakov face a claim by Fieldfisher LLP, the Director of Education and Training at the Solicitors Regulation Authority tackle a claim by two solicitors, and train operator First MTR South Western Trains file a claim against a security company. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • February 15, 2024

    Lenovo, Motorola Lose Injunction Bid In IP License Fight

    A North Carolina federal judge has rejected a bid from Lenovo and Motorola Mobility to block Ericsson from being able to enforce injunctions it got in other countries barring sales of Lenovo products in those countries.

  • February 15, 2024

    Shoppers Say Albertsons-Kroger Suit Shortcomings Fixed

    Consumers challenging Kroger's $24.6 billion bid for Albertsons defended their revised lawsuit in California federal court against the supermarkets' latest dismissal bid, arguing their tweaked complaint now adequately identifies the affected stores and lays out how the deal threatens competition.

  • February 15, 2024

    Google, AGs Told To Step Up Discovery In Texas-Led Suit

    A Texas federal judge on Thursday told counsel for Google and a coalition of states led by Texas that they must do a better job coordinating discovery in an antitrust suit accusing the tech giant of monopolizing the online ad market.

  • February 15, 2024

    Facebook Users Win Class Status For £2.3B Data Claim

    One year after sending a £2.3 billion ($2.9 billion) proposed class action against Meta Platforms Inc. back to the drawing board, the U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal has agreed to certify a 44 million-strong class of U.K. consumers who say that the social media titan exploited their data.

  • February 15, 2024

    Biggest Tiremakers Sued Over Alleged Price-Fixing

    An Illinois tire buyer is piggy-backing off last month's European Commission raids of tire manufacturers in a new class action, alleging that the biggest players in the industry have been colluding to artificially inflate new replacement tire prices in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • February 15, 2024

    FTC's Khan Calls Healthcare 'Key' To Fight For Competition

    Federal Trade Commission Chair Lina Khan told a conference of physicians the agency is fighting corporate control at several levels of the healthcare industry, touting the sector as a key battleground in the administration's push for more competition across the economy.

  • February 15, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Homeowners' Cert. In Allstate Overcharge Suit

    Allstate will have to face a class action accusing it of artificially inflating home insurance premiums for thousands of California properties by double-counting built-in garage space, a Ninth Circuit panel ruled, affirming a lower court's decision.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 14, 2024

    Pfizer Reaches $93M Deal With Lipitor Buyers In Antitrust MDL

    Pfizer Inc. has agreed to shell out $93 million to put to rest Lipitor buyers' claims in sprawling antitrust multidistrict litigation over the cholesterol medication that stretches back more than a decade, according to a motion filed Wednesday in New Jersey federal court.

  • February 14, 2024

    Visa Says $5B Swipe Fee Deal Blocks Intuit, Square Claims

    Visa and Mastercard have asked a New York federal court to throw out antitrust claims brought by Intuit and Square, arguing that their claims were released as part of the $5.6 billion class action settlement the credit card companies finalized with merchants last year.

  • February 14, 2024

    9th Circ. Open To Rebooting Suit Over Apple App Crypto Theft

    A Ninth Circuit panel appeared open Wednesday to reviving a putative class action alleging Apple misrepresented the safety of its App Store after users' cryptocurrency was stolen from an app, with two judges questioning why the allegations can't survive when Apple has consistently touted its security in separate antitrust litigation.

  • February 14, 2024

    Network Group Wants Faster Access To Utility Poles

    Federal regulators must push for further reforms in order to expedite talks between utility pole owners and high-speed equipment attachers on how to divvy up pole upgrade costs, a broadband trade group said.

  • February 14, 2024

    Campbell Soup Says It Gave FTC Info For $2.7B Sauce Deal

    Campbell Soup Co. has given the Federal Trade Commission all the information the agency has asked for concerning its planned acquisition of Sovos Brands, the owner of the popular sauce brand Rao, before the agency decides whether to give the $2.7 billion union its blessing.

  • February 14, 2024

    Google Again Targets 'Strategic' Texas AGs' Ad Tech Delays

    Google is hoping a newly appointed special master can finally force a coalition of state attorneys general led by Texas to hand over "fundamental information" it said Tuesday has long been improperly withheld from one of three cases targeting its dominance over display advertising placement auction technology.

  • February 14, 2024

    'Vague' Offer Fails To Win Feds Another Try At $103.5M IT Deal

    A Court of Federal Claims judge rejected the Federal Trade Commission's bid to revisit a challenged $103.5 million information technology deal, saying the agency didn't justify going back on its agreement to pause the contract while the case is resolved.

  • February 14, 2024

    FTC Seeks Info On 'Powerful Middlemen' Amid Drug Shortages

    The Department of Health and Human Services and the Federal Trade Commission announced Wednesday that they are seeking information on whether legal exemptions for "middlemen" in the generic pharmaceutical market are driving ongoing drug shortages.

  • February 15, 2024

    Dartmouth Ruling Tips Off Athletes' Rights Redux At NLRB

    After punting on the issue nearly a decade ago, the National Labor Relations Board is poised to decide whether college athletes can unionize following a regional official's decision to allow a union vote among Dartmouth College men's basketball players.

  • February 14, 2024

    Insurer Needn't Defend Landlord From Antitrust MDL

    A Washington state judge has ruled in favor of an insurer in a coverage dispute revolving around nearly 40 antitrust class action claims against landlords that have been combined into a multidistrict litigation case, finding that the insurer owes no defense coverage to an accused property manager.

  • February 14, 2024

    NHL, Junior Leagues Accused Of Exploitation In Antitrust Suit

    The National Hockey League and three independent but affiliated junior leagues are accused of systematically exploiting teenage players and immersing them in a culture of "economic, physical, psychological, and sexual" abuse as part of their development, according to a putative federal antitrust class action filed in New York Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Colo. Wants To Stop $24B Kroger Merger, 'No Poach' Deal

    Colorado's attorney general on Wednesday sued to block a proposed $24.6 billion merger between Kroger and Albertsons, alleging in a state court complaint that the deal between the state's two largest grocery chains would result in a virtual monopoly in some regions and harm consumers and workers.

  • February 14, 2024

    Juul Gets More Antitrust Claims To Arbitration

    A California federal judge has sent two more claims against Juul to arbitration and dismissed a request for an injunction to block Altria's already-unwound investment in the company.

  • February 14, 2024

    BAE's $5.6B Bid For Ball Aerospace Arm Clears Review

    The U.S. Department of Justice has ended its review of BAE Systems PLC's acquisition of Ball Corp.'s aerospace subsidiary for $5.6 billion, providing the last approval needed for the transaction, the companies said Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Visa, Mastercard Accused Of Anticompetitive 'Floor' In Fees

    A group of merchants argued on Wednesday that Visa and Mastercard breach antitrust laws when they charge interchange fees and impose rules on some card schemes, saying that they are anticompetitive because there is no fair negotiation.

  • February 13, 2024

    FTC's Monopolization Case Against Amazon Set For 2026 Trial

    A Washington federal judge has scheduled a bench trial in the Federal Trade Commission's landmark monopolization case against Amazon for early October 2026, according to an order issued Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • Opinion

    Why Challenges To FTC Authority Are Needed

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    In spite of skepticism from courts, the Federal Trade Commission continues to advance novel legal theories — and Meta's recent federal suit against the agency over its alleged "structurally unconstitutional" administrative proceedings is arguably an expression of backlash to regulatory overreach, says Daniel Gilman at the International Center for Law & Economics.

  • The Year In FRAND: What To Know Heading Into 2024

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    In 2023, there were eight significant developments concerning the fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory patent licensing regime that undergirds technical standardization, say Tom Millikan and Kevin Zeck at Perkins Coie.

  • Volume-Based Transaction Pricing Proposal Raises Questions

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    A rule recently proposed by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which would prohibit securities exchanges from offering volume-based transaction pricing for agency or riskless principal orders in certain stocks, is meant to address competitive concerns — but there are reasons to question the logic behind this proposal, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • NCAA Proposal Points To A New NIL Compensation Frontier

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    Although NCAA President Charlie Baker's recent proposal for Division I institutions to pay student-athletes for name, image and likeness licensing deals is unlikely to pass in its current form, it shows that direct compensation for student-athletes is a looming reality — and member institutions should begin preparing in earnest, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • Fed's New Swipe At Debit Fees Stirs Up Dilemma For Banks

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    The Federal Reserve's proposal to reduce the cap on debit card interchange fees charged or received by card issuers and payment networks comes as other bank account fees are taking regulatory hits, which could all culminate in an overall decline in access to banking products and services, says Kristen Larson at Ballard Spahr.

  • Behind Antitrust Enforcers' 2023 Labor And Employment Push

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    This year, the U.S. Department of Justice and Federal Trade Commission stepped up their already-considerable efforts to expand antitrust enforcement to labor and employment, a trend that is likely to continue into next year, say Benjamin Dryden and Richard Flannery at Foley & Lardner.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Exploring Middle-Market M&A Trends In 2023 And Beyond

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    Middle-market merger and acquisition activity this year was affected by a number of economic, legal and regulatory shifts, with certain trends pointing to favorable transaction conditions in 2024, say Jason Brauser and William Goodling at Stoel Rives.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Parsing 2023's Energy Markets Enforcement

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    A review of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's and Commodity Futures Trading Commission's recently released fiscal year 2023 enforcement reports highlight the significant energy market enforcement activities, litigation pursued and settlements reached by both agencies, as well as their respective strategic goals and focus areas, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Hoopers In NCAA Suit Respark Eligibility Framework Debate

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    A decision by two brothers involved in a recent antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA — to play college basketball rather than go professional after graduating from the Overtime Elite league — has aimed the spotlight on what exactly the NCAA deems permissible compensation under its current framework, say Brady Foster and Dan Lust at Moritt Hock.

  • Lessons From DOJ's Wave Of Labor Market Prosecutions

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    Attorneys at Patterson Belknap consider lessons learned and future meaningful challenges following the U.S. Department of Justice's first six criminal antitrust cases targeting employee no-poach and wage-fixing agreements, in which just one case resulted in a guilty plea.

  • Opinion

    Giving The Gov't Drug Patent March-In Authority Is Bad Policy

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    The Biden administration's recent proposal to allow government seizure of certain taxpayer-funded drug patents is a terrible idea that would negate the benefits of government-funded research, to the detriment of patients and the wider economy, says Wayne Winegarden at Pacific Research Institute.

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