Connecticut

  • April 29, 2024

    Biz Groups Fight Conn. Ban On 'Captive Audience' Meetings

    A Connecticut law that lets workers skip employers' meetings to discuss unionization violates employers' right to free speech, a coalition of business groups argued in Connecticut federal court, seeking a pretrial win on allegations that the law violates the U.S. Constitution and federal labor law.

  • April 29, 2024

    Amtrak Wants Out Of Black Conductor's Bias Suit

    Amtrak is urging a Connecticut federal judge to let it out of a Black conductor's lawsuit alleging she was passed over for union committee assignments in favor of less experienced white men and harassed by a superior after she complained, saying her gripes should be directed solely at the union.

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    Connecticut Quarry Crushed By Politics Gets Extra $1.2M

    The town of East Haven, Connecticut, and two former officials must pay an additional $1.2 million to a rock quarry that was forced to shutter due a purported political maneuver ahead of the 2017 mayoral race, on top of an existing award of $9.46 million in damages for lost profits, a federal judge has ruled.

  • April 29, 2024

    Conn. Health Co., Competitor Eye Deal In Trade Secrets Suit

    Connecticut-based healthcare marketing firm Primacy LLC and a direct competitor accused of poaching top executive Matt Cyr are looking to settle a trade secrets lawsuit by pausing a preliminary injunction hearing and engaging a new magistrate judge to help them work out their differences.

  • April 29, 2024

    Connecticut Firm Seeks $500K Fee In Magnesium Class Action

    A Connecticut law firm has asked a New Jersey federal judge to approve its request for $500,000 in attorney fees and expenses for its representation in a class action over a company's allegedly deceptive advertising of a magnesium supplement.

  • April 29, 2024

    Aetna Can't Arbitrate Aramark's Suit Over Billing Issues

    A Texas federal judge refused to boot to arbitration a suit Aramark filed against Aetna accusing the insurer of costing the food services company millions by approving shoddy health benefit claims, saying the allegations fall into a carveout in the parties' arbitration agreement.

  • April 29, 2024

    Justices Deny Review Of Hezbollah-Tied Bank's Immunity

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to examine whether sovereign immunity shields a defunct Lebanese bank from terrorism victims' allegations the bank funded Hezbollah, despite the victims' contention that an answer would provide clarity for disputes involving foreign trade.

  • April 29, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Musk's Case Against SEC Gag Order

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday said it will not review the terms of a settlement Elon Musk entered into with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission six years ago, keeping intact a Second Circuit decision that upheld the terms of a deal that said the Tesla CEO must receive preauthorization before making certain social media posts about the car manufacturer.

  • April 29, 2024

    Justices To Weigh RICO Injury Scope In CBD Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear a case brought by a trio of CBD companies asking the justices to establish whether a plaintiff can bring a personal injury claim under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.

  • April 26, 2024

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    In the past year, plaintiffs have won settlements and judgments for millions and billions of dollars from companies such as Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Fox News, with many high-profile cases finally wrapping up after years of fighting. Such cases — involving over-the-top compensation packages, chemical contamination, gender discrimination and data mining — were led by attorneys whose accomplishments earned them recognition as Law360's Titans of the Plaintiffs Bar for 2024.

  • April 26, 2024

    Thomas' Long Quest To Undo A 'Grave Constitutional Error'

    A quarter-century after Justice Clarence Thomas cast a pivotal vote against jury trial rights and rapidly regretted it, his relentless campaign to undo the controversial precedent is suddenly center stage with a serious shot at succeeding, as judges and lawyers increasingly deem the decision dubious and the U.S. Supreme Court chips away at its edges.

  • April 26, 2024

    Health Co. Not Liable For Cigna Underpayment, 3rd Circ. Says

    The Third Circuit on Friday backed a win for a healthcare cost management company in a suit over Cigna's alleged underpayment for plastic surgery, finding the contract between the company and a plastic surgery practice did not guarantee a set payment rate.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-Conn. Hospital Worker Says He Was Assaulted, Then Fired

    Stamford Health Inc. terminated a hospital maintenance worker soon after he suffered a violent assault in the workplace, claiming that he abandoned his job even though it failed to provide him with necessary paperwork to take medical leave, according to an amended lawsuit filed Friday in Connecticut federal court.

  • April 26, 2024

    Conn. Appeals Court Won't Pause Hospital's $1.9M Payout

    A Connecticut hospital cannot hold off on paying a $1.9 million prejudgment remedy to the group of anesthesiologists who accused it of failing to pay $3.2 million for their medical services, according to a new order from a state appeals court.

  • April 26, 2024

    Women Can't Tie Rogue Fertility Doc To Yale, University Says

    A Connecticut fertility doctor's former patients don't have probable cause to include Yale entities in their claims that he secretly inseminated them with his own sperm, so a state court should deny their prefiling bid for discovery, the university and its healthcare organizations have said.

  • April 26, 2024

    L Catterton Buys Majority Stake In KIKO Milano At $1.5B Value

    Private equity firm L Catterton said Friday it has agreed to buy a majority stake in the Percassi family's beauty brand KIKO Milano, in a deal steered by Italian law firms Bonelli Erede Lombardi Pappalardo and Gatti Pavesi Bianchi Ludovici, respectively, along with several additional consultants and financial advisers. 

  • April 25, 2024

    Crypto Co. DCG Hires 1st Legal Chief Amid New York AG Fight

    The head of cryptocurrency conglomerate Digital Currency Group on Thursday said the firm has appointed its first chief legal officer, hiring the former top lawyer of payment management firm Billtrust as DCG fights a lawsuit by New York's attorney general and other disputes. 

  • April 25, 2024

    Conn. Judge Sends Colo. Mass Shooting Cases To State Court

    A Connecticut federal judge sent two lawsuits against gunmaker Sturm Ruger & Co. Inc. back to state court Thursday, finding that the complaints brought by the estates of two Colorado mass shooting victims did not meet a key standard for handling the claims in federal court.

  • April 25, 2024

    Vince McMahon Accuser Says Arbitration Bid Is Full Of 'Lies'

    The former World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. legal staffer who accused founder Vince McMahon of sexually abusing and trafficking her is fighting his bid to arbitrate the explosive lawsuit, arguing that he used a recent motion to mount a "vicious" and untrue attack on her character.

  • April 25, 2024

    Patent Holder Settles Transfer Fraud Case Tied To $17M Win

    The holder of a patent on a device that prevents New York City subways from flooding on Thursday settled a case adjacent to a $17.8 million infringement feud by agreeing to accept $850,000 from an individual and two companies accused of helping siphon money away from the infringers.

  • April 25, 2024

    AIG Unit Says Gunmaker's Suit Policy Omits $250K Per Year

    A gun manufacturer must pay $250,000 in self-insured retention limits for each calendar year that underlying litigation brought by the city of Gary, Indiana, is pending — stretching back to a defense agreement reached 10 years ago — an AIG unit has told a Connecticut federal court, saying the agreement was never terminated.

  • April 25, 2024

    WWE Shareholders Combine Chancery TKO Merger Suits

    Delaware's Court of Chancery will decide this summer whether teams led by Block & Leviton, Bernstein Litowitz or Robbins Geller will represent World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. stockholders in a consolidated class suit against founder Vincent McMahon and others over the company's $21 billion merger with the Endeavor Group.

  • April 25, 2024

    Conn. Judge In Drug Price-Fixing Suit Reveals Day Pitney Ties

    U.S. District Judge Michael P. Shea of the District of Connecticut said Thursday he will not recuse himself from overseeing state enforcers' price-fixing claims against Sandoz Inc. and other drug companies despite Sandoz's attorneys being from Day Pitney LLP, where he was once a partner.

  • April 25, 2024

    Real Estate Atty, Insurer Scuttle Hacking Policy Feud In Conn.

    A Connecticut real estate attorney and an insurance company owned by Berkshire Hathaway have moved to end their claims against one another, in a state court dispute over who should be on the hook after the lawyer was accused of transmitting several property payments to hackers.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

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    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • HR Antitrust Compliance Crucial Amid DOJ Scrutiny

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    The Justice Department's Antitrust Division recently announced a required human resources component for antitrust compliance programs, which means companies should evaluate their policies to prevent, detect and remediate potential violations as they add training for HR professionals, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • 4 Steps To Navigating Employee Dementia With Care

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    A recent Connecticut suit brought by an employee terminated after her managers could not reasonably accommodate her Alzheimer's-related dementia should prompt employers to plan how they can compassionately address older employees whose cognitive impairments affect their job performance, while also protecting the company from potential disability and age discrimination claims, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

  • Navigating New Regulations In Healthcare And Other M&A

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    While notice requirements recently enacted in several states are focused on the healthcare industry for now, this trend could extend to other industries as these requirements are designed to allow regulators to be a step ahead and learn more about a transaction long before it occurs, say Kathleen Premo and Ashley Creech at Epstein Becker.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

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