Construction

  • May 06, 2024

    NOLA Can't Arbitrate $51M Airport Defect Row With Insurers

    A Louisiana federal judge granted a group of insurers a preliminary injunction Monday, relieving them from forced arbitration in a dispute over alleged design defects at a new $1 billion terminal of the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport.

  • May 06, 2024

    GM Tells Mich. Justices Not To Heap On More Auto Regulation

    General Motors urged the Michigan Supreme Court to reject a call to expand the reach of a state consumer protection law to the automotive industry and others, saying federal and state oversight already protects car buyers.

  • May 06, 2024

    Tribes, Groups Seek 9th Circ. Stay In Power Line Ruling

    Two Native American tribes and conservation groups are asking the Ninth Circuit for a stay on an order that allows work to continue on a $10 billion power line, saying that without an emergency injunction, SunZia Transmission LLC will race to finish erecting its remaining towers before an appeal can be resolved.

  • May 06, 2024

    Feds' Emissions Subsidy Args Lack Specificity, Says Judge

    The U.S. Court of International Trade affirmed the government's analysis on two of three criteria required to label South Korea's emissions credit system a countervailable subsidy, but it said the U.S. Department of Commerce came up short on specificity.

  • May 06, 2024

    Home Builder Beats NC Trade Secrets Suit

    The North Carolina's business court scrapped an interior designer's claims that a competitor stole cabinetry designs and customer information when it hired a former employee, sparing only an accusation that the ex-worker embezzled money.

  • May 06, 2024

    Judge Questions Reason For Removing Chem Co. Wage Class

    A Pennsylvania federal judge joined chemical company workers Monday in questioning whether the company had plausibly alleged that there were enough people in a proposed class to remove their wage suit from state court.

  • May 06, 2024

    Claims Court Won't Toss Dispute Over Army Corps Work Redo

    A Court of Federal Claims judge on Monday refused to dismiss a lawsuit alleging the Army Corps of Engineers wrongly required a building construction contractor to redo its work, ruling the suit was not barred by a related previous case.

  • May 06, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A record $100 million settlement, a fishy Facebook decision, a canceled Amazon delivery and an upended $7.3 billion sale dispute topped the news out of Delaware's Court of Chancery last week. There were also new cases involving Hess, Microsoft and the 2022 World Cup.

  • May 06, 2024

    Feds Agree To Terminate Pipeline's Right-Of-Way Permit

    A New York federal judge has paused litigation between the Tonawanda Seneca Nation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for 75 days while the agency terminates a right-of-way permit for a wastewater pipeline, saying it is "in the interest of judicial economy" and recognizing the tribe's concerns.

  • May 06, 2024

    Clifford Chance Continues 2024 Growth In New York, Houston

    Clifford Chance continued its recent aggressive expansion by growing its Houston and New York offices with two attorneys specializing in energy, taxation and mergers and acquisitions, bringing the firm's lateral hires up to 10 attorneys in 2024.

  • May 03, 2024

    Real Estate Authority: Dirty Money, Forever Chems, Housing

    Law360 Real Estate Authority covers the most important real estate deals, litigation, policies and trends. Catch up on this week's developments by state — as well as on the illicit billions tucked away in commercial real estate, attorney takeaways from new "forever chemical" designations, and one foreign investor's bet on U.S. housing.

  • May 03, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig No Longer Repping Guatemala In $32M Suit

    Guatemala's newly elected government has decided not to have Greenberg Traurig as its counsel in its fight against a construction and engineering firm's bid to enforce $31 million in arbitral awards, according to a Friday filing in a D.C. federal court.

  • May 03, 2024

    EU OKs Nippon-US Steel Deal As DOJ Causes Delayed Close

    The European Commission on Friday indicated via an annotation on its merger review page that it has given Nippon Steel's controversial $14.9 billion acquisition of U.S. Steel its unconditional approval, a move that comes just a day after the parties announced the deal would be delayed due to further scrutiny from the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • May 03, 2024

    Colo. Jury Hits Berkshire Unit With $7M Monopoly Verdict

    A Colorado federal jury on Friday awarded the rival of a Berkshire Hathaway-owned construction supplier $6.7 million for the larger company's monopolistic practices, hours after a judge scolded the Berkshire company's lawyer because he "crossed a line" during closings.

  • May 03, 2024

    Berkshire Hathaway Countersuit Tossed From Contractor Spat

    A California federal judge tossed Berkshire Hathaway's counterclaims in a $17 million coverage dispute with a fiber optic network developer over an unfinished project, ruling that the insurer failed to meet heightened standards after claiming the developer conspired to prevent the contractor from performing its work.

  • May 03, 2024

    Debevoise, Davis Polk Guide Windstream, Uniti Merger

    Uniti Group Inc., advised by Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP, on Friday unveiled plans to merge with Debevoise & Plimpton LLP-led telephone service company Windstream Holdings II LLC in a deal that includes a $425 million cash component, $575 million in preferred equity and a minority share in common equity of the combined company.

  • May 03, 2024

    Ohio Statehouse Catch-Up: Trans, Abortion Laws Face Battles

    Ohio lawmakers have shepherded controversial bills impacting healthcare, social media and other matters into law in recent months, prompting lawsuits and even a veto from Gov. Mike DeWine.

  • May 02, 2024

    DOJ Wants More Info On Controversial US Steel-Nippon Deal

    U.S. Steel revealed Thursday it has received a second request for information from the U.S. Department of Justice about its controversial plan to be sold to Japan's Nippon Steel Corp., but it said the deal is on track to be completed in the second half of this year. 

  • May 02, 2024

    Haaland Faces Senate Heat Over Interior Dept.'s Land Policies

    U.S. Secretary of Interior Deb Haaland on Tuesday defended her agency's commitment to fostering energy development on public lands as U.S. senators criticized her agency over issues ranging from new rules to the pace of energy leasing and project permitting.

  • May 02, 2024

    Biden Announces $3B To Fund Lead Pipe Replacement

    The Biden administration is distributing $3 billion to states so they can replace lead water pipes that pose a health risk to those who rely on them for drinking water, as part of the larger goal to remove all lead service lines nationwide.

  • May 02, 2024

    Green Groups Want FEMA To Define 'Resiliency'

    Environmental advocacy and consumer groups sued the Federal Emergency Management Agency in D.C. federal court Thursday, alleging the agency is way past its deadline to initiate rulemaking to define "resilient."

  • May 02, 2024

    Dem Sens. Urge Biden To Keep Or Hike China Steel Tariffs

    A coalition of Democratic U.S. senators has urged the Biden administration to keep or raise tariffs on Chinese steel, saying China has been manipulating steel prices and lowering the tariffs would be harmful to the U.S. industry.

  • May 02, 2024

    11th Circ. Lets Georgia Island Dock Lawsuit Proceed

    A Georgia conservation group can resume its challenge to federal approval of a private pier on Cumberland Island after a divided Eleventh Circuit panel said regulators could conduct a more rigorous environmental review even though the dock was already built.

  • May 02, 2024

    Door Maker Asks To Undo Landmark Divestiture Order

    Door maker Jeld-Wen has asked a Virginia federal court to dismiss an order in a private merger challenge requiring it to sell a manufacturing plant, saying the landscape has changed since the landmark 2018 ruling.

  • May 02, 2024

    Eckert Seamans Sues For Inclusive Zoning Fight Fees

    Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott says a group representing Pittsburgh-area developers still owes nearly $76,000 in legal fees for the firm's work on a federal suit challenging an "inclusive zoning" ordinance, according to a complaint filed in Pennsylvania state court Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • Payment Provision Lessons From NJ Construction Ruling

    Author Photo

    A New Jersey appellate court's decision in Bil-Jim v. Wyncrest, holding that an American Institute of Architects contract was not an installment contract, highlights both the complexities of statute of limitations calculations and the significant consequences that can arise from minor differences in contract language, say Mitchell Taraschi and Zac Brower at Connell Foley.

  • Ruling In La. May Undercut EPA Enviro Justice Efforts

    Author Photo

    A Louisiana federal court's recent decision in Louisiana v. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will likely serve as a template for other states to oppose the EPA's use of disparate impact analyses in Title VI civil rights cases aimed at advancing environmental justice policies and investigations, say Jonathan Brightbill and Joshua Brown at Winston & Strawn.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Facts Differ But Same Rules Apply

    Author Photo

    Zachary Jacobson and Sarah Barney at Seyfarth examine two decisions illustrating that reliance on a technicality may not save an otherwise untimely appeal, and that enforcement of commercial terms and conditions under a federal supply schedule contract may be possible.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • A Legal Playbook For Stadium Construction Agreements

    Author Photo

    As a new wave of construction in the professional sports arena space gets underway, owners must carefully consider the unique considerations and risks associated with these large-scale projects and draft agreements accordingly, say attorneys at Akerman.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

    Author Photo

    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • New Eagle Take Permit Rule Should Help Wind Projects Soar

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's recently issued final rule revising the eagle take permit process should help wind energy developers obtain incidental take permits through a more transparent and expedited process, and mitigate the risk of improper take penalties faced by wind projects, says Jon Micah Goeller at Husch Blackwell.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

    Author Photo

    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

    Author Photo

    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Business Litigators Have A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

    Author Photo

    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

    Author Photo

    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

    Author Photo

    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • Opinion

    Contractors Need Protection From NJ Homeowner Protections

    Author Photo

    A recently passed New Jersey law, combined with the state's Consumer Fraud Act, is intended to protect innocent homeowners, but legislative action must be taken to prevent homeowners from abusing the law to avoid paying hardworking contractors, say Gary Strong and Madison Calkins at Gfeller Laurie.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Construction archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!