Construction

  • September 24, 2020

    Ex-Union Prez Gets 3½ Years For Setting Up 'Brutal Assault'

    A former ironworkers union president received 3½  years in prison for helping organize an attack on nonunion workers that left at least one victim hospitalized, the U.S. Department of Justice has said.

  • September 24, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Invictus, IMC Equity, Prologis

    Invictus Real Estate Partners has reportedly bought out its partner's stake in a Connecticut apartment complex in a deal valuing the property at $157 million, IMC Equity Group is said to be seeking permission to build a Miami mixed-use project and Prologis has reportedly dropped $12 million on a Chicago warehouse.

  • September 24, 2020

    Media Reports On Trump Can't Back Subpoena, 2nd Circ. Told

    Public reports accusing President Donald Trump and his businesses of wrongdoing did not justify the scope of the grand jury subpoena by the Manhattan district attorney for tax returns and financial records, Trump's attorneys told a federal appeals court Thursday.

  • September 24, 2020

    Trade Groups, 17 States Blast Hold On Key Nationwide Permit

    Energy companies, electrical workers and states have called a Montana federal judge's decision to vacate a nationwide water permit used for pipeline construction as drastically overbroad and a threat to America's electrical system.

  • September 24, 2020

    Insurers Win Litigation Ban In UK Claim Over $1B Texas Case

    A London judge ordered a British engineering and construction firm to withdraw U.S. litigation seeking to force 10 insurers to cover defense costs for a $1.4 billion cost-overrun suit in Texas, extending his prior anti-suit injunction.

  • September 24, 2020

    Finance Co. Says Texas City Owes $15M For Fumbled Project

    A Dallas finance company has accused an Austin, Texas, suburb of misleading it into providing $15 million to revive a failing real estate development project under loan agreements the city now claims are void.

  • September 24, 2020

    Trump Admin. Asks Trade Court To Pause China Tariff Cases

    The Trump administration has asked the U.S. Court of International Trade to pause litigation in roughly 3,400 suits challenging tariffs on more than $300 billion of Chinese imports until the court decides how to manage the cases.

  • September 24, 2020

    Bain-Led Group Inks $2.5B Take-Private Deal With Fiber Co.

    Finnish sustainable fiber-based materials maker Ahlstrom-Munksjo agreed on Thursday to be taken private by a consortium of buyers, including private equity firm Bain Capital and three of the company's existing shareholders, in a deal steered by five firms that values the fiber solutions company's equity at €2.1 billion (about $2.45 billion).

  • September 24, 2020

    4th Circ. Says NC Law May Shield Internal Safety Complaints

    North Carolina law protected a construction worker from retaliation when he called out a colleague's on-duty intoxication, the Fourth Circuit said Thursday in a ruling clarifying protections for workers who report safety concerns internally rather than to state authorities.

  • September 23, 2020

    Tribes Say Mexican Border Wall Curtails Cultural Practices

    A group of Native American tribes based in San Diego County in California has filed suit in D.C. federal court against the U.S. government over its construction of a wall along the Mexican border, claiming the barrier will prevent them from freely accessing cultural sites on both sides of the border.

  • September 23, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: TSG, Mega Lion, Panda Kitchen

    A TSG Group venture is reportedly on the hunt for $14 million in incentives for a Florida multifamily project, Mega Lion is said to be leasing 132,423 square feet in California for five years, and Panda Kitchen and Bath has reportedly paid $6.5 million for a Florida property where it plans to build a new headquarters.

  • September 23, 2020

    5th Circ. Says Jury Cleared Hotel In Construction Cost Fight

    A Louisiana trial judge wrongly wiped out a jury verdict that cleared a New Orleans hotel operator of a contractor's claim that it was given flawed building plans, the Fifth Circuit has held, ordering the trial court to reinstate the original verdict. 

  • September 23, 2020

    Firm Says There's No Reason To Put $36M Award OK On Hold

    A Bolivian investment firm is urging the Tenth Circuit not to put its ruling enforcing a $36 million arbitral award on hold while the U.S. Supreme Court considers the matter, dismissing as "fanciful" a Mexican cement company's hopes that the justices will vacate the decision.

  • September 23, 2020

    3 Law Firms Guide $27M Manhattan Property Deal

    Pillsbury and Kramer Levin helped a GDS Development-Klovern AB joint venture with its purchase of a property on 10th Avenue in Manhattan as well as development rights at a location nearby for $26.7 million, Herrick Feinstein, counsel to seller the Wainland family, exclusively told Law360 on Wednesday.

  • September 23, 2020

    AGs Say White House Enviro Review Rule Threatens Species

    A group of state attorneys general have told the White House that its controversial overhaul of environmental review regulations violates the Endangered Species Act.

  • September 23, 2020

    Tribe Not Immune To Casino Settlement Suit, 9th Circ. Says

    The Ninth Circuit has found that the Guidiville Rancheria of California waived its sovereign immunity to a suit by environmental activists, saying the tribe can't dodge the environmentalists' claim that its settlement with the city of Richmond over a failed casino project violated a state open meeting law.

  • September 23, 2020

    Eric Trump Must Give Deposition Before Election, Judge Rules

    Eric Trump can't wait until after the November election to sit for a deposition in the state attorney general's office probe into whether President Donald Trump inflated the value of his assets, a New York judge ruled Wednesday.

  • September 23, 2020

    Insurer Dodges Defending Against 600 Construction Suits

    Clarendon National Insurance Co. beat two other insurers' efforts to force it to share defense and indemnity costs they paid to policyholders facing over 600 construction suits, after a California federal judge found the court lacks diversity jurisdiction.

  • September 22, 2020

    House Sends Tribal Gov't Contracting Bill To Trump's Desk

    The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill that would give Native American tribes more power to shape their self-governance contracts with the federal government, sending the legislation to the president to sign after earlier approval by the Senate.

  • September 22, 2020

    Fla. Businesses Win Class Cert. In Suit Over Water Main Break

    Thousands of businesses forced to temporarily close last year when a water main broke in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, have won approval to move forward with a class action against Florida Power & Light Co. and the contractors they say are responsible for hundreds of millions of dollars in economic damages.

  • September 22, 2020

    Fla. Asphalt Co. To Pay $16.6M Over South American Bribes

    A Florida asphalt company will pay $16.6 million in connection with an agreement to plead guilty to paying bribes to state-owned oil companies in South America in exchange for access to government contracts, federal prosecutors in Brooklyn said Tuesday.

  • September 22, 2020

    Taylor Wessing Reps On Planned £1B Housing JV

    Represented by Taylor Wessing, an EQT unit said Tuesday it's launched a joint venture with United Kingdom-based housing developer Sigma Capital to create a £1 billion portfolio of 3,000 rented homes.

  • September 22, 2020

    Asbestos Risk Group Slams EPA's Bid To Avoid Tighter Rules

    Asbestos awareness advocates on Tuesday slammed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's effort to dodge a suit pushing for stronger regulations, saying the agency is missing a chance to have a better understanding of asbestos through tighter reporting requirements.

  • September 22, 2020

    New DOL Independent Contractor Rule Asks Who's The Boss

    The U.S. Department of Labor's long-awaited proposed rule on classifying workers as employees or independent contractors would depart from decades of past practice by emphasizing some parts of a multifactor test over others, wage and hour attorneys told Law360.

  • September 22, 2020

    More Than 3,300 Importers Energized To Erase China Tariffs

    A push to undo the bulk of President Donald Trump's tariffs on Chinese goods has swelled to include more than 3,300 lawsuits in the U.S. Court of International Trade as importers pin their hopes on a mostly procedural challenge to invalidate a central pillar of Trump's trade policy.

Expert Analysis

  • A Road Map For Drafting Persuasive Discovery Motions

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    Best practices that can help litigators write convincing discovery motions include thinking about the audience, addressing a few key questions, and leaving out boilerplate from supporting briefs, says Tom Connally at Hogan Lovells.

  • How Congress Can Depoliticize The Supreme Court

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    Congress has multiple means to take the politics out of federal judicial nominations and restore the independence of the U.S. Supreme Court — three of which can be implemented without a constitutional amendment, says Franklin Amanat at DiCello Levitt.

  • 5 Ways Retailers Can Mitigate Product Liability Litigation Risk

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    While courts sometimes hold retailers liable for injuries caused by products they sold but did not manufacture — as a California appeals court did recently in Bolger v. Amazon — retailers can implement a number of strategies to reduce product liability litigation risk, say Alexandra Cunningham and Elizabeth Reese at Hunton.

  • Opinion

    The Case For A Nonpolitical Federal Judiciary

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    For the last 20 years, at the insistence of both parties, U.S. Supreme Court nominations have been fierce ideological battles — which is bad for the country and bad for the public's perception of the legitimacy of the court, say Judge Eric Moyé, Judge Craig Smith and Winston & Strawn partner Tom Melsheimer.

  • The Keys To A Better Privilege Logging Paradigm

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    Current privilege logging practices to identify what information is being withheld from discovery often lead to costly disputes, so practitioners should adopt a system based on trust and good faith, similar to the presumptions embedded in the business judgment rule for corporate directors and officers, say Kevin Brady at Volkswagen and Charles Ragan and Ted Hiser at Redgrave.

  • White House Due Process Memo Could Reform Enforcement

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    A little-noticed memo recently issued by the Trump administration in response to the pandemic, directing federal agencies to provide greater due process to individuals and companies under regulatory investigation, represents a long-overdue sea change in the way justice is carried out in enforcement proceedings, say Joan Meyer and Norman Bloch at Thompson Hine.

  • Law Firm Hiring Considerations In A COVID-19 Economy

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    Financially robust law firms are entering the recruiting market aggressively knowing that dislocations like the COVID-19 crisis present rare competitive opportunities, and firms that remain on the sidelines when it comes to strategic hiring will be especially vulnerable to having their best talent poached, says Brian Burlant at Major Lindsey.

  • Lessons From Md.'s Purple Line For Public-Private Contracts

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    Recent litigation over the Purple Line light rail project in the Maryland suburbs of Washington, D.C., illustrates why unambiguous contracts are a must when private and public entities enter into a partnership to develop critical infrastructure, says Laura Fraher at Shapiro Lifschitz.

  • Streamlining Power Transmission Siting To Help Renewables

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    It can take years and cost millions of dollars to secure state regulatory approval for electric transmission system upgrades needed to facilitate clean energy development, so it is important for states to create abbreviated siting processes for projects with limited anticipated impacts, says Andy Flavin at Troutman Pepper.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Act To Preserve Democracy This Election

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    COVID-19 concerns and glaring gaps in registration threaten to dampen voter turnout in the 2020 election, so attorneys should take on the problem by leveraging their knowledge and resources in seven ways, says Laura Brill at Kendall Brill.

  • Opinion

    State AG Enforcement Is Important For Workers' Rights

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    A recent increase in state attorney general labor and employment enforcement — including a challenge that prompted a New York federal judge to strike down the U.S. Department of Labor’s joint employer rule last week — sends an important message that worker protections are not easily revoked, says Catherine Ruckelshaus at the National Employment Law Project.

  • How To Effectively Defend Witnesses In Remote Depositions

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    When a witness is isolated from the defending lawyer during a remote deposition, carefully planning the logistics and building witness confidence are critical to avoiding damaging admissions, say Jessica Staiger at Archer Daniels and Alec Solotorovsky at Eimer Stahl.

  • Whether And How To Compel Remote Arbitration

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    As the pandemic delays in-person arbitration hearings, mediator and arbitrator Theodore Cheng provides arbitrators with a checklist to examine the rationale and authority for compelling parties to participate in remote hearings.

  • The Unique Challenges Of Protecting A Law Firm Brand

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    Recent law firm trademark disputes highlight how the tension between legal ethics rules and trademark law can make it difficult for firms to select brands that are distinctive and entitled to protection, say Kimberly Maynard and Tyler Maulsby at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Now Is The Time To Engage With NY Climate Reg Process

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    New York state is rapidly mobilizing to implement the extraordinary greenhouse gas emission reductions required by the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act, so stakeholders must engage quickly to influence how the law's broad mandates are turned into enforceable regulations, say Kevin Healy and Philip Karmel at Bryan Cave.

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