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  • June 24, 2019

    Hawkins Parnell & Young Adds Trial Lawyer In Chicago

    A trial attorney for municipalities and companies who was formerly a shareholder at Segal McCambridge Singer & Mahoney Ltd. has joined Hawkins Parnell & Young LLP in Chicago.

  • June 24, 2019

    High Court Puts Local Limits On Energy Development At Risk

    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent takings ruling could flood federal courts with challenges to state and local restrictions on energy development and discourage state and local governments from enacting limits on things like oil and gas drilling or large-scale renewable energy projects.

  • June 24, 2019

    US Constitution On 'Scabby's' Side, Judge Tells NLRB

    A Brooklyn federal judge picked apart a National Labor Relations Board official’s bid to stifle a union protest spanning a few Staten Island supermarkets in court Monday, saying the Constitution appears to protect Scabby the inflatable rat, but withholding his judgment — for now.

  • June 24, 2019

    Texas Supreme Court Halts El Paso Landmark Demolition

    The Texas Supreme Court has halted the demolition of a set of buildings to make way for a $180 million entertainment facility after a local historian told the court the bell "cannot be unrung" if the potential landmarks are razed.

  • June 24, 2019

    FTC Wins Bids To Shut Down Jury Trial In Belize Fraud Case

    A Maryland federal judge has granted the Federal Trade Commission's bids to deny an executive's and a marketing employee's separate requests for a jury trial in a Belize property sales case that the agency calls the largest overseas real estate investment scam it's targeted.

  • June 24, 2019

    High Court Turns Away 3 Transportation Cases

    The U.S. Supreme Court turned away three transportation appeals Monday, including petitions challenging Los Angeles’ requirement that airport businesses negotiate labor peace agreements with unions that request them and the Seventh Circuit’s revival of a pay dispute involving SkyWest flight attendants.

  • June 24, 2019

    REIT's Choice Named Umpire To Break Logjam On $21M Claim

    A Florida federal judge on Monday appointed a real estate investment trust's nominee to serve as the third member of an arbitration panel and break an impasse over the REIT's $20.6 million claim for insurance coverage for property damage from Hurricane Irma.

  • June 24, 2019

    Cozen O'Connor Picks Up Real Estate Atty In DC

    Cozen O’Connor has added a former Linowes & Blocher partner who will focus on acquisition, development, leasing and sales as a member of the firm’s growing real estate practice group in Washington, D.C.

  • June 24, 2019

    Manhattan Residents Sue To Block City's 14th St. Busway Plan

    A group of Manhattan block associations and co-ops said Friday that New York City's Department of Transportation is violating state and city environmental laws with its plans to limit passenger car traffic on 14th Street and turn the thoroughfare into a so-called busway, according to filings in state court.

  • June 24, 2019

    Enviros Insist On Standing At DC Circ. In FERC Pipeline Row

    An environmental group has said its spending on air-testing and education creates standing to challenge a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission order that limits the scope of climate change reviews for certain pipeline projects, asking the D.C. Circuit to reconsider an early end to the case.

  • June 24, 2019

    Justices Won't Examine Challenge To Trump Steel Tariffs

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a steel importer group's bid to knock down tariffs imposed last year by President Donald Trump, leaving in place the president's broad authority to set trade restrictions in the name of national security.

  • June 21, 2019

    Knick Ruling Levels The Field, May Signal Court's Agenda

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision Friday to overturn a 1985 ruling that forced landowners to go to state court first with wrongful taking claims but allowed governments to choose state or federal court signals that the justices may take up additional property rights questions, experts say.

  • June 21, 2019

    49ers, Fans Push For Quick Wins In Levi's Stadium ADA Case

    The San Francisco 49ers and a group of fans who rely on wheelchairs each have sought to put a quick end to an Americans with Disabilities Act suit in California federal court that claims the NFL team’s stadium fails to provide full, equal access as required by federal and state law.  

  • June 21, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Label, SAP Qualtrics, Churchill

    Developer Label & Co. has reportedly bought 63 acres in Florida for $10.28 million, SAP Qualtrics is said to be leasing 300,000 square feet in Seattle and Churchill Real Estate has reportedly landed $52 million in financing for a Manhattan mixed-use building.

  • June 21, 2019

    Asset Management Firm CEO Gets 6½ Years For $20M Fraud

    The former CEO of Virginia asset management firm Kiddar Capital LLC was sentenced Friday to 6½ years in prison for bilking nearly 30 investors out of $20 million through a real estate investment Ponzi scheme, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • June 21, 2019

    Worker Denied Comp After Failing To Prove Injury At Refinery

    A construction worker is not entitled to workers' compensation for shoulder and back injuries he claims he received at a Phillips 66 refinery because he didn't prove he got hurt at work, an Illinois appellate court has ruled.

  • June 21, 2019

    Trump Calls For Agencies To Limit Climate Change Reviews

    The Trump administration on Friday unveiled draft guidance that would narrow how federal agencies should consider climate change impacts in their National Environmental Policy Act reviews of energy, infrastructure and other projects.

  • June 21, 2019

    Fla. Appeals Court Revives Effort To Block ER Project

    A Florida appeals court on Friday revived a hospital and homeowners association's bid to block construction of a free-standing emergency room near their properties, saying that, although they failed to exhaust administrative remedies, an exception applies because Manatee County, Florida, exceeded its authority in approving the project.

  • June 21, 2019

    Gas Co. Insurers Want $189M Harvey Damage Row Arbitrated

    A group of insurers has asked a New York state court to force arbitration of a coverage dispute with Freeport LNG Development LP over $189 million in losses the company and its business partners allegedly incurred when Hurricane Harvey struck a construction project at a liquefied natural gas plant in Texas.

  • June 21, 2019

    Arconic Dodges Investors' Suit Over Grenfell Tower Fire

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Friday tossed an investor suit against Arconic Inc. related to London's fatal Grenfell Tower fire, ruling the investors failed to properly allege that the company's executives knew insulation panels implicated in the fire were being sold for unsafe uses.

  • June 21, 2019

    Army Corps Must Nix Wetland Build Permit, Enviros Say

    An advocacy group focused on certain wetlands in Eastern Virginia hit the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with a lawsuit in federal court Thursday, alleging the agency’s approval of a pollutant discharge permit for a nearby construction project flouted environmental protection laws.

  • June 21, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen a cryptocurrency operator facing investigations in the U.S. sue HSBC, a number of food import-export companies hit cargo giant MSC with claims, and the Lloyds-owned Bank of Scotland take on the attorney general. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 21, 2019

    Trump Rebuke Of Injunctions Could Mean Headaches For Biz

    Businesses have long bemoaned “regulatory patchworks” that require them to meet different environmental standards in different parts of the country, and the Trump administration’s position that courts shouldn’t be able to impose nationwide injunctions on executive branch rules could take away an important avenue for companies to seek certainty.

  • June 21, 2019

    High Court Finds Landowner Has A Path To Federal Court

    A Pennsylvania property owner can take her claim that the government unconstitutionally took value from her land directly to federal court without first seeking compensation at the state level, the U.S. Supreme Court said on Friday.

  • June 20, 2019

    9th Circ. Leery Of Feds' Border Wall Funding Justification

    Ninth Circuit judges considering the government's appeal of an order partially blocking federal funds from being used for a U.S.-Mexico border wall questioned Thursday whether the feds are just inventing justifications to get around Congress, with one judge noting the government could claim it's building a giant movie screen.

Expert Analysis

  • SC Attorney-Client Privilege Ruling Is A Gift To Insurers

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    In the Mt. Hawley case, the South Carolina Supreme Court adopted a case-by-case framework to address competing concerns in discovery of insurers' attorney-client privileged communications in bad faith litigation. In doing so, however, the court created an unfair requirement for policyholders, say Bradley Dlatt and James Davis of Perkins Coie.

  • 4 State Responses To Opportunity Zones

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    State legislatures across the country are responding to the federal opportunity zone provisions in a variety of ways that could provide significant state tax benefits for businesses that act quickly, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • What Employers Can Expect From NLRB's New Reg Agenda

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    The National Labor Relations Board recently outlined its rulemaking priorities. From union election "blocking charges" to standards for determining joint employer status, Lori Armstrong Halber at Reed Smith discusses the important details from each agenda item.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Can Improve Their Job Interviews

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    When evaluating potential new hires, law firms should utilize structured interviews in order to create a consistent rating system that accurately and effectively assesses candidates' skills and competencies, says Jennifer Henderson of Major Lindsey.

  • An In-Depth Guide To Latest Opportunity Zone Regs: Part 2

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    The final part of this deep dive into proposed opportunity zone regulations focuses on fund compliance requirements and new rules with respect to leases, opportunity zone businesses and real estate, says Marc Schulz of Snell & Wilmer.

  • An In-Depth Guide To Latest Opportunity Zone Regs: Part 1

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    In the second tranche of opportunity zone proposed regulations, the IRS provides extremely flexible guidance that may be enough to induce investors to start investing all of the capital sitting on the sidelines into qualified opportunity funds, says Marc Schulz of Snell & Wilmer.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.

  • Law Firms Can Do Better With Their Mentoring Programs

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    There are a few practical, proactive steps law firms can take to create a mentoring program that pays dividends — instead of creating a mediocre program that both parties see as an obligation, says Kate Sheikh of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • How To Comply With NYC's New Climate Mobilization Act

    Excerpt from Lexis Practice Advisor
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    Even though compliance is not mandated until 2024, New York City building owners should begin taking steps now to prepare for the Climate Mobilization Act's new limits on buildings' greenhouse gas emissions, say YuhTyng Patka and David Miller of Duval & Stachenfeld.

  • The Latest Developments In Criminal Cases Against Execs

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    This spring, there was some noteworthy news in white collar government investigations impacting executives, including the first successful prosecution in the opioid bribery scheme and the first criminal charges for failure to report under the Consumer Product Safety Act, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 'Rocket Docket' Justifies Its Name For 11th Straight Year

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    The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia “rocket docket” is still the fastest federal civil trial court in the country despite some recent trends causing its median time to trial to grow to 13.2 months, says Robert Tata of Hunton.

  • Measuring The Value Of A Law Firm's Social Media Efforts

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    Most legal marketers struggle to show the return on investment of their social media efforts, but establishing and answering several key questions can help demonstrate exactly how social media programs contribute to a law firm's bottom line, say Guy Alvarez of Good2bSocial and communications consultant Tom Orewyler.

  • How New State Laws Will Affect Power Plant Closure Costs

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    Many states are proposing and passing legislation in response to the economic impacts of coal and nuclear power plant closings. Some of the legislation would provide short time frames for recouping closing costs from ratepayers, so plant owners must track policy developments closely, say Bruce Baker and Libby Ford of Nixon Peabody.

  • Reports On USMCA Offer Industry-Specific Guidance For Cos.

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    Recent reports from the International Trade Commission and the U.S. Trade Representative have assessed the likely impacts of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement on the U.S. economy. By reviewing the reports' predictions for their industries, companies can be better prepared in case the USMCA is ratified, say Francesca Guerrero and Kayla Toney of Winston & Strawn.

  • The Aftermath Of High Court's Class Action Removal Opinion

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    In Home Depot v. Jackson, the U.S. Supreme Court held last week that a third party named as a defendant in a class action counterclaim cannot remove the case to federal court under the Class Action Fairness Act, which will likely lead to many more class actions filed as counterclaims in state court, say attorneys at Mayer Brown.