Corporate Crime & Compliance UK

  • June 12, 2024

    Investors To Sue Betting Giant For £100M Over Bribery Probe

    Entain PLC, the owner of gambling businesses Ladbrokes and Coral, is set to face a £100 million ($128 million) legal battle from institutional investors who say Entain did not warn them about a prosecution over its alleged failure to prevent bribery in Turkey.

  • June 12, 2024

    Automakers Safe From French Law In 'Dieselgate' Disclosure

    Vehicle manufacturers including Renault and Peugeot Citroen that face thousands of "dieselgate" claims for allegedly cheating car emission tests are not at any risk of criminal prosecution in France while disclosing evidence before trial in England, a London court has ruled.

  • June 12, 2024

    Fuel Trader Says £5M Payments Were For Market Advice

    A former fuel trader insisted at his fraud trial in London on Wednesday that he received £5.2 million ($6.6 million) in payments for providing consultancy advice on "betting on the right horse" rather than in secret commissions.

  • June 11, 2024

    PC Gaming Giant Valve Faces £656M Action For Overcharging

    Valve Corp., owner of the world's largest video game distribution platform, Steam, has been hit with a proposed £656 million ($836 million) class action for allegedly overcharging 14 million PC gamers in the U.K., the digital rights campaigner filing the claim announced Wednesday.

  • June 11, 2024

    UniCredit Overturns $69M Plane Payment Sanctions Ruling

    UniCredit was entitled to withhold $69.3 million in payments to lessors for Russian planes because of sanctions, a London appellate court ruled Tuesday, partly overturning findings that it was not reasonable for the bank's U.K. branch to believe it could not make the payments. 

  • June 11, 2024

    KC Advised Post Office To Remove Judge From Horizon Trial

    A top barrister advised the Post Office to get a High Court judge to recuse himself from a trial dealing with wrongly prosecuted subpostmasters or else risk losing all litigation brought by the subpostmasters, the barrister recalled in an inquiry hearing Tuesday regarding the scandal.

  • June 11, 2024

    Tories Pledge To Tackle Court Backlog, Carry On Rwanda Plan

    The Conservative Party announced a slew of justice plans on Tuesday to cut the criminal court backlog, support third-party litigation funding and abandon international human rights commitments, if necessary, to pursue its Rwanda migrants policy.

  • June 11, 2024

    Serco Denies Directors Knew Of Fraud In Securities Trial

    Serco Group PLC denied investors are entitled to compensation over a fraud that caused the outsourcing giant's share price to nosedive, arguing on the second day of a London trial Tuesday that none of its directors had known about the alleged wrongdoing.

  • June 11, 2024

    Widow Who Signed Docs 'Without Reading' Still Owes $64M

    A London appellate court has ruled that a former Hong Kong resident can't escape a personal guarantee to pay 500 million Hong Kong dollars ($64 million) to cover bonds issued by her husband's company, in part because she entered the contract for business purposes.

  • June 11, 2024

    FCA Eyes Consumer Impact Of New Legal Cooperation Rules

    The Financial Conduct Authority has set out how it is working with the Financial Ombudsman Service and other bodies under a new duty of legal cooperation required by the Consumer Duty and changing payments regulations.

  • June 11, 2024

    LC&F Administrators Attack Ex-Boss' Credibility In Ponzi Case

    The administrators of London Capital & Finance PLC have criticized the company's former head as a "thoroughly unreliable witness" as they closed their case that he and others operated the business as a £237 million ($302 million) Ponzi scheme.

  • June 11, 2024

    BHS Directors To Pay Liquidators £18M For Wrongful Trading

    A London judge ordered two former directors of failed retail chain BHS on Tuesday to pay liquidators at least £18 million ($23 million) after finding that they knew that the company was beyond rescue when it was purchased in 2015.

  • June 10, 2024

    23andMe Faces UK-Canadian Probe Into Data Breach

    The U.K. and Canada said Monday that they are jointly investigating a data breach at genetic testing company 23andMe, which allowed hackers to access data from 6.9 million users.

  • June 10, 2024

    Man Gets 1 Year For Manslaughter Of Ex-Boss In 2006 Attack

    An Albanian man was sentenced to a year in prison Monday for killing his former boss, after the Crown Prosecution Service linked the victim's life-altering head injuries from an attack nearly two decades ago to his death in 2017.

  • June 10, 2024

    Starmer Could Crack Judicial Crisis, Former CPS Chiefs Say

    Keir Starmer's lead in the polls as the general election in July approaches has sparked hopes among criminal justice advocates that the Labour leader — a former top prosecutor — will implement reforms as prime minister.

  • June 10, 2024

    Serco Accused Of Playing Around With Books As Trial Opens

    Institutional investors told a London court Monday that Serco had "played around" with its financial reporting to keeping the government from clocking fraud in its contract for electronic tagging services as a landmark securities trial kicked off.

  • June 10, 2024

    European Financial Body Calls On UK To Clarify AML Reforms

    A European body representing financial market participants has called on HM Treasury to provide more clarity in the Money Laundering Regulations through planned amendments, including by specifying the exact point when a firm must check a potential customer's background.

  • June 10, 2024

    Amazon Sold Facial Tech To Russia, Ex-Employee Alleges

    A former Amazon worker has alleged that the technology giant sold facial recognition software to a Russian company in violation of U.K. sanctions.

  • June 07, 2024

    Feds Charge UK Trio Over $2M 'Evolved Apes' NFT Scheme

    Three United Kingdom residents face criminal wire fraud and money laundering charges brought by federal prosecutors in Manhattan alleging they misappropriated cryptocurrency worth roughly $2 million as part of a "rug pull scheme" involving the digital assets known as non-fungible tokens.

  • June 07, 2024

    Merchants Get OK For Visa, Mastercard Fees Suit On 2nd Try

    A group of merchants got a tentative go-ahead Friday to bring a collective action accusing Visa and Mastercard of unfairly imposing interchange fees on retailers after revising weaknesses in the initial proposal at the U.K.'s specialist antitrust court.

  • June 07, 2024

    Crypto Developers Fight To Gag Wright After 'Satoshi' Trial

    A group of cryptocurrency asset developers urged a London judge on Friday to order Australian computer scientist Craig Wright to never again assert that he is the pseudonymous inventor of bitcoin Satoshi Nakamoto, arguing it was the best way to end his "campaign of dishonesty."

  • June 07, 2024

    Axed Telecom CEO Loses Early Battle In Whistleblower Suit

    A former interim chief executive officer at a telecom company has failed for now to get her job back, with a tribunal saying it was unconvinced by her early-stage claim that she was unfairly dismissed for calling out allegedly unlawful business proposals that would breach agreements with HSBC.

  • June 07, 2024

    Former Allianz Unit Exec Admits Role In $6B Fund Fraud

    A former portfolio manager at Allianz SE's U.S. unit told a Manhattan federal judge Friday that he lied to investors about the risks of the German finance giant's now-defunct Structured Alpha Funds, admitting to his role in a $6 billion fraud.

  • June 07, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen British broadcaster GB News hit with a libel claim by climate activist Dale Vince, MGM take aim at an immersive events company over intellectual property rights to the James Bond franchise, and law firms Stephenson Harwood and Bowen-Morris & Partners tackle a contracts claim by investment adviser Yieldstreet. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 07, 2024

    Trio Make First Appearance In FCA's £8M Pension Fraud Case

    Three consultants made their first court appearance on fraud charges in London on Friday to face allegations by the Financial Conduct Authority over an investment scheme in which victims lost £8 million ($10.1 million) of their pension savings.

Expert Analysis

  • Pharma Remains A Key Focus Of EU Antitrust Enforcement

    Author Photo

    The recently published European Commission report on pharmaceutical sector competition law illustrates that effective enforcement of EU rules remains a matter of high priority for EU and national authorities, say lawyers at Dechert.

  • Dissecting Recent Developments Against The Misuse Of NDAs

    Author Photo

    The U.K. government's recent plans to nullify nondisclosure agreements that prevent victims from reporting crimes should remind lawyers to proactively consider the necessity of such agreements, especially in light of the Solicitors Regulation Authority's warning notice on drafting improper NDAs, say Clare Davis and Macaela Joyes at RPC.

  • What UK Energy Charter Treaty Exit Would Mean For Investors

    Author Photo

    While the U.K.'s recent announcement that it intends to withdraw from the Energy Charter Treaty is a bold political signal, investor protections will remain in place for a significant period of time, ensuring that an element of certainty and business continuity will remain, say Karel Daele and Jessica Thomas at Taylor Wessing.

  • Assessing The FCA Data Study's Response To User Concerns

    Author Photo

    The Financial Conduct Authority’s recently published report on the supply of wholesale financial data differs from others in its exceptional breadth and analysis of an enormous volume of information, but in its reluctance to address market power or pricing directly, the regulator’s approach is still cautious, say Emma Radcliffe and Greg Dowell at Macfarlanes.

  • Uber Payout Offers Employer Lessons On Mitigating Bias

    Author Photo

    Uber Eats' recent payout to a driver over allegations that the company's facial recognition software was discriminatory sheds light on bias in AI, and offers guidance for employers on how to avoid harming employees through the use of such technology, says Rachel Rigg at Fieldfisher.

  • Apple Ruling Offers Morsel Of Certainty On Litigation Funding

    Author Photo

    An English court's recent decision in Gutmann v. Apple, finding that a litigation funder could be paid via a damages award, offers a piece of guidance on the permissibility of such agreement terms amid the ongoing uncertainty around funded group litigation in the U.K., says Mohsin Patel at Factor Risk Management.

  • Cum-Ex Prosecutions Storm Shows No Sign Of Abating

    Author Photo

    The ongoing trial of Sanjay Shah in Denmark is a clear indicator that efforts remain focused on holding to account the alleged architects and beneficiaries of cum-ex trading, and with these prosecutions making their way across Europe, it is a more turbulent time now than ever, says Niall Hearty at Rahman Ravelli.

  • Traversing The Web Of Nonjudicial Grievance Mechanisms

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Covington provide an overview of how companies can best align their environmental and human rights compliance with "hard-law" requirements like the EU's recently approved Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive while also navigating the complex global network of existing nonjudicial grievance mechanisms.

  • Opinion

    FCA Greenwashing Rules Need To Be Stronger To Be Effective

    Author Photo

    The Financial Conduct Authority's forthcoming anti-greenwashing measures, aimed at ensuring the veracity of regulated entities’ statements about sustainability credentials, need external scrutiny and an effective definition of "corporate social responsibility" to give them bite, says Jingchen Zhao at Nottingham Trent University.

  • Companies House False Filings Raise Issues Of Integrity

    Author Photo

    A recent spate of unauthorized company filings with Companies House raises specific concerns for secured lenders, but also highlights the potential for false filings to be used to facilitate fraudulent schemes, says Daniel Sullivan at Charles Russell.

  • Gov't Probe Highlights Computer-Based Evidence Issues

    Author Photo

    A recently launched U.K. Home Office probe, following the alleged use of faulty data in criminal cases, illuminates the need for scrutiny on the presumed reliability of evidence from computer-based systems, says Jessica Sobey at Stokoe Partnership.

  • UK Courts Continue To Struggle With Crypto-Asset Cases

    Author Photo

    Although the common law has proved capable of applying established principles to crypto-assets, recent cases highlight persistent challenges in identifying defendants, locating assets and determining jurisdiction, suggesting that any meaningful development will likely come from legislative or regulatory change, say Emily Saunderson and Sam Mitchell at Quadrant Chambers.

  • Why Computer Evidence Is Not Always Reliable In Court

    Author Photo

    Recent challenges to the admissibility of encrypted communication from the messaging tool EncroChat highlight the flawed presumption in the U.K. common law framework that computer evidence is always accurate, and why a nuanced assessment of such evidence is needed, say Sam De Silva and Josie Welland at CMS Legal.

  • Comparing The UK And EU Approaches To AI Regulation

    Author Photo

    While there are significant points of convergence between the recently published U.K. approach to artificial intelligence regulation and the EU AI Act, there is also notable divergence between them, and it appears that the U.K. will remain a less regulatory environment for AI in the foreseeable future, say lawyers at Steptoe.

  • Lessons On Using 3rd-Party Disclosure Orders In Fraud Cases

    Author Photo

    The expansion of the gateway for service out of jurisdiction regarding third-party information orders has proven to be an effective tool against fraud since it was introduced in 2022, and recent case law offers practical tips on what applicants should be aware of when submitting such orders, says Rosie Wild at Cooke Young.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!