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Cybersecurity & Privacy

  • February 19, 2019

    NIST Cybersecurity Framework Still Going Strong 5 Years On

    A government-created cybersecurity framework has morphed into an unofficial liability shield for a broad range of private industries, and it promises to continue to be influential as the push to develop more formal security standards intensifies, attorneys say.

  • February 19, 2019

    Roger Stone In Hot Water With DC Judge Over Instagram Post

    Indicted political operative Roger Stone is facing a D.C. federal court hearing Thursday over his Monday Instagram post widely described as showing crosshairs next to the judge overseeing his case, a development the judge said could jeopardize Stone's bond.

  • February 19, 2019

    FERC Pressured To Disclose Cybersecurity Violators

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission was hit with renewed criticism on Tuesday for shielding the names of power companies whose cybersecurity deficiencies pose a threat to the U.S. electric grid.

  • February 19, 2019

    Yelp Rejects Paralegal's Claim It Dominates Google Searches

    Yelp asked a California federal court Tuesday to toss a paralegal's antitrust and racial discrimination suit accusing it of monopolizing Google's search results and refusing him equal treatment, arguing it has no control over Google results and doesn't make business contracts that favor "non-African-American individuals."

  • February 19, 2019

    Embassy Suites Guest Raped In Room Settles Suit

    A woman who was raped in an Embassy Suites hotel after staff gave her attacker a key to her room has settled her negligence case in Iowa federal court against the hotel’s owner and management company, saying she is determined to advocate for greater guest safety in the hotel industry.

  • February 19, 2019

    Justices Deny LLC Owner's Appeal Over Financial Privacy Law

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to consider whether financial privacy law extends beyond individuals and partnerships to limited liability companies, rejecting a case from the owner of a Michigan LLC that had business records subpoenaed by the IRS.

  • February 19, 2019

    Cyber Co. Palo Alto Buys Security Automation Biz For $560M

    Cybersecurity company Palo Alto Networks said on Tuesday that it has agreed to buy Demisto, which specializes in security orchestration, automation and response, for $560 million as the company looks to build out its immediate threat prevention and response systems.

  • February 19, 2019

    EQT Says Pa. Workers 'Raided' Files Just Before Being Fired

    A pair of EQT Corp. employees raided the company’s computers and copied confidential data in the early-morning hours before a meeting in which they were going to be fired, the company claimed in filings made in Pennsylvania state and federal courts Tuesday.

  • February 19, 2019

    'Fortnite' Hack Exposed Player Payment Info, Suit Claims

    Epic Games Inc., the company behind online video game "Fortnite," failed to adequately protect players' accounts, opening the door for hackers to steal sensitive information like payment details in a digital breach in 2018, according to a proposed class action filed Friday in Illinois state court.

  • February 19, 2019

    US Trade Group Warns Against Europewide 5G Standards

    U.S. wireless trade association CTIA distanced itself from a global trade group's call for a Europewide testing regime on 5G network equipment, arguing that a secure supply chain for next-generation networks is a global issue, and competition would suffer if that chain is governed inconsistently.

  • February 19, 2019

    Hacking Suspect Lauri Love Can’t Reclaim Seized Computers

    A London judge ruled Tuesday that Lauri Love, a British man charged with a series of hacks into U.S. government websites, can't get back computers and hard drives confiscated by the U.K.'s National Crime Agency, saying some of the data on the devices "belongs to others."

  • February 19, 2019

    EU Regulator Turns Focus To UK Clearinghouses' Brexit Plans

    Europe’s top securities regulator said on Tuesday that it will focus on ensuring U.K. clearinghouses can process EU trades after March, as well as helping the bloc’s trade repositories and credit ratings agencies execute their plans for dealing with Brexit during 2019.

  • February 15, 2019

    The $1B Question: Can Puerto Rico Afford Its Bankruptcy Bills?

    Law firms and other professional service providers are seeking more than $300 million in bills for Puerto Rico’s unprecedented restructuring — a figure that is eventually expected to surpass $1 billion. Some local attorneys are questioning the costs.

  • February 15, 2019

    Puerto Rico’s Law Firms Find Their Footing After Disaster

    Out of disaster comes opportunity. That is what the corporate legal community of Puerto Rico found after Hurricane Maria. But for many attorneys, the recovery is personal, too.

  • February 18, 2019

    UK Lawmakers Brand Facebook 'Digital Gangsters' In Report

    U.K. lawmakers labeled Facebook and its executives as "digital gangsters" in a scathing report issued Monday and called for regulators to police social media companies to stop fake news from skewing public perception of issues of national importance, including the Brexit campaign.

  • February 18, 2019

    GDPR Prompts New Deal Between UK Data, City Watchdogs

    The U.K.'s data protection and financial watchdogs revised their promise to work together on Monday, agreeing to share information that either agency uncovers during an investigation as long as it complies with new European data protection rules. 

  • February 15, 2019

    TCPA Challengers Can't Go Around Gov't, High Court Told

    The federal government has jumped into a U.S. Supreme Court fight over the proper channel for challenging the Federal Communications Commission's reading of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, arguing that private litigants aren't allowed to go around the government to launch collateral attacks on the validity of agency orders. 

  • February 15, 2019

    Pokemon Co. Promises No 'Go' In Deal To End Trespass Row

    Niantic Inc., the company behind Pokemon Go, has promised to take steps aimed at dissuading players of the popular augmented reality game from trespassing on private property and causing other nuisances, as part of a proposed settlement outlined in documents filed Thursday in California federal court.

  • February 15, 2019

    Facebook Data Leak Negotiations Put FTC In Hot Seat

    As negotiations reportedly heat up, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission is facing pressure to give Facebook a historic fine for its notorious data leak or face off with the social network in a court battle that could test the teeth of its consent decrees.

  • February 15, 2019

    Super 8 Owner’s Cert. Bid Denied In AT&T Junk Fax Suit

    A Connecticut federal judge has rejected a class certification bid in a Super 8 motel owner’s suit over alleged junk faxes from AT&T, saying there’s no viable way to determine whether the proposed class members individually agreed through contracts to receive the faxes.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Ways To Reduce Risk Under Ill. Biometric Privacy Law

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's decision last month in Rosenbach v. Six Flags resolves much of the uncertainty about when an individual may bring suit under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act. Now is the time for companies to ensure BIPA compliance, say attorneys with Fenwick & West LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Problem With 'Optimal' Diversity

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    Organizations should seek to avoid discrimination, but they should also be wary of the idea that diverse teams function better than nondiverse teams, because this reasoning lacks evidence and can lead to a slippery slope, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research LLC.

  • An Important Class Issue The High Court Left Unresolved

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    In Campbell-Ewald v. Gomez, the U.S. Supreme Court left unanswered the question of whether a class plaintiff’s claim is rendered moot if complete relief is provided. If a recent Second Circuit case — Geismann v. ZocDoc — is appealed, the Supreme Court could provide needed clarity, say attorneys at Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP.

  • State Net

    States May Take The Lead On Regulating AI

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    While artificial intelligence promises to revolutionize the way we live and work, there has been relatively little government regulation targeting it specifically. But legislation referring to AI is currently pending in at least 13 states, and more may be on the way, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Austin's Blockchain For The Homeless Faces Challenges

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    The city of Austin, Texas, has proposed a program using blockchain technology to connect homeless residents with their health and identity records. Creating the infrastructure for the project will not be difficult, but key questions include whether the homeless will participate and how they can access their information, says Edward Block of Foley & Lardner LLP.

  • Class Cert. Is Next Frontier Of Data Breach Litigation

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    Much has been written about establishing Article III standing in data breach cases, but the obstacles plaintiffs must overcome to win class certification are less explored. So far, one case — Smith v. Triad of Alabama — offers insight into this somewhat uncharted territory, say Nicole Rekant and Stevan Pardo of Pardo Jackson Gainsburg PL.

  • Where Calif. Privacy Law And Employee Benefits Data Collide

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    For covered businesses, the California Consumer Privacy Act's broad use of the term “consumer” means that the new law could apply to data collected about California residents under health, retirement and other employee benefit plans, say attorneys with Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP.

  • What To Watch As Pa. Justices Consider Facebook-Post Firing

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    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s eventual decision in Carr v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania could have a significant effect on how public employers in the state address employee social media use, say Ivo Becica and Qiwei Chen of Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel LLP.

  • Recent Trends In FTC Consumer Protection Enforcement

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    The Federal Trade Commission is focusing its enforcement efforts on financial services, web services and emerging technologies, data security and consumer privacy, telecommunications, and health care — these five areas represented 88 percent of consumer protection actions in 2017 and 2018, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Lowered Bar For BIPA Lawsuits Will Raise Insurance Issues

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent ruling in Rosenbach v. Six Flags is likely to continue the proliferation of Biometric Information Privacy Act litigation, in turn leading to more insurance coverage disputes over whether BIPA claims involve "personal and advertising injury" or "property damage," says Jonathan Viner of Nicolaides Fink Thorpe Michaelides Sullivan LLP.