Hospitality

  • October 23, 2020

    Exotic Dancers Sue Md. Nightclub Over Job Misclassification

    A proposed class of dancers sued a Maryland strip club Friday in federal court, claiming the club misclassified them as independent contractors to avoid paying them the minimum wage.

  • October 23, 2020

    AGs Ask Justices For Broad Autodialer View In Facebook Suit

    More than three dozen states on Friday called on the U.S. Supreme Court to broadly define an autodialer under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act to mean any device that can store and dial numbers automatically, as the justices tackle Facebook's bid to erase class claims over its security texts.

  • October 23, 2020

    McDonald's Calls Black Franchisees' Racial Bias Suit 'Illogical'

    A putative class action accusing McDonald's of systematic discrimination against Black former franchise owners is illogical, largely time-barred, and based on speculation, the fast-food giant said in an Illinois federal court dismissal bid Friday.

  • October 23, 2020

    NLRB Must 'Explain' Separate Bargaining Units, DC Circ. Says

    The D.C. Circuit ruled Friday that the National Labor Relations Board can't ignore precedent that cuts against a decision allowing a Chicago hotel's staff to form separate bargaining units, telling the labor board it has to do a better job explaining its rationale.

  • October 23, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Modalia, Montage, MG3

    Modalia Capital has reportedly paid $11.25 million for a Florida development site, Montage International is said to have bought a Chicago hotel and plans to rebrand the property, and MG3 reportedly paid $11.6 million for a Florida warehouse.

  • October 23, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen electronics giant Philips take on another Chinese rival over patents, automaker Daimler AG face another group action, and a Canadian pension fund and dozens of others sue troubled security firm G4S. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • October 23, 2020

    EEOC Hits Colo. Nursing Facility With Sexual Harassment Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has hit a Colorado senior nursing facility with a graphic complaint accusing it of standing by while female employees experienced groping, flashing and other sexual harassment by its clients, and then firing a worker for complaining about the situation.

  • October 23, 2020

    Hotel Group To Get Early Contract Ruling In €93M Apollo Suit

    A judge agreed on Friday to settle some contract disputes early in a lawsuit brought by a Spanish hotel group against Apollo Capital Management over a stalled €93 million ($110 million) resort deal, but warned that the result might mean an early demise for the hotelier's case.

  • October 23, 2020

    Virgin Holidays Pledges £200M Refunds After CMA Steps In

    Virgin Holidays has promised to refund £203 million ($265 million) to customers whose holidays were canceled amid the COVID-19 outbreak after the U.K.'s consumer protection watchdog threatened to take the company to court.

  • October 22, 2020

    Laid-Off Oakland Marriott Workers Can't Weigh In On Union

    Workers who were laid off from their jobs at an Oakland, California, Marriott due to the COVID-19 pandemic cannot vote in an upcoming union election because they don't have reason to believe they will be rehired soon, a National Labor Relations Board official said Thursday.

  • October 22, 2020

    Sioux Tribe Wins Tax Suit For Casino Contractor Work

    A South Dakota federal judge has ruled that the state can't tax contracting work performed by a nontribal company on the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe's on-reservation casino, saying the tax is preempted by both the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act and the Indian Trader Statutes.

  • October 22, 2020

    Va. Golf Course Dispute Delayed As Dominion Seeks More Info

    A Virginia federal magistrate judge told Dominion Energy on Thursday it can get a brief delay to seek documents tied to a jurisdictional dispute in litigation over business losses allegedly incurred by the former owner of a golf course, which was sculpted from coal ash from the power company that triggered a tangle of environmental issues.

  • October 22, 2020

    DC-Area Eateries To Pay $850K To End DOL Wage Dispute

    The operator of five D.C.-area restaurants has agreed to pay nearly $850,000 in damages and unpaid minimum and overtime wages to more than 200 employees following an investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor.

  • October 22, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: EverWest, EOS Investors, HallKeen

    EverWest Real Estate Investors has reportedly paid $13.1 million for a Florida warehouse, EOS Investors is said to be the mystery buyer of a Beverly Hills hotel the U.S. government recently sold, and HallKeen Management has reportedly sold a South Florida affordable housing complex for $14.35 million.

  • October 22, 2020

    Disney Hotel Won't Nix Conference Pact For Virus, Suit Says

    An investment research firm has sued a Walt Disney-branded hotel in Florida federal court, saying the hotel won't agree to nullify a contract for it to host a conference with 2,000-plus attendees even though COVID-19 makes it "illegal, impossible or impracticable" for the firm's conference to go forward.

  • October 22, 2020

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    The nation's top court has upheld Pennsylvania's three-day mail-in ballot extension, a group of North Carolina restaurants are the first to win "physical loss" insurance coverage in court in light of state-mandated COVID-19 shutdowns, and CVS wants out of a suit challenging its claims to the effectiveness of its hand sanitizer.

  • October 22, 2020

    Crypto Biz Founder Says Scant Facts Doom Del. Investor Suit

    An attorney for the co-founder of a cryptocurrency-enabled gambling enterprise told a Delaware vice chancellor Thursday that an aggrieved investor has no facts to back up claims that deception cost it a stake in a business spun off from the original company.

  • October 22, 2020

    Ruby Tuesday Gets 2-Month Rent Payment Deferral In Ch. 11

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge on Thursday gave Ruby Tuesday a 60-day rent payment deferral after hearing that the casual dining chain has promised its landlords a cut of a retirement plan trust fund the company is seeking to claim to pay down its debts.

  • October 21, 2020

    NYC Eatery Asks 2nd Circ. To Block Cuomo's 'Food Curfew'

    A New York City eatery asked the Second Circuit on Tuesday to block New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's rule forbidding New York City restaurants from serving dine-in customers after midnight, arguing there is neither a real nor substantial relationship between the restriction and the public health interest.

  • October 21, 2020

    Coronavirus Regulations: A State-By-State Week In Review

    Staffers in New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy's office became the latest high-profile government workers to test positive for COVID-19 over the past week, just as the Garden State, New York and Connecticut added states to their joint pandemic travel advisory list.

  • October 21, 2020

    NC Restaurants 1st To Get COVID-19 'Physical Loss' Coverage

    A North Carolina judge has ruled that The Cincinnati Insurance Co. owes a group of restaurants coverage for their losses stemming from state-mandated COVID-19 shutdowns, a move that the group's attorneys say is the first decision to hold that shutdown orders to contain the virus caused a "physical loss."

  • October 21, 2020

    Sonic Corp. Accused Of Serving Consumers Unwanted Texts

    National fast food chain Sonic Corp. was accused in Oklahoma federal court Wednesday of bombarding a proposed class of consumers with unwanted text message advertisements, in a suit filed by an Illinois man who claims the company ignored his request to opt out of the ads.

  • October 21, 2020

    Princess Cruise Passengers Denied Cert. In COVID-19 Suit

    A California federal judge has refused to certify a proposed class action against Princess Cruise Lines that claims it let passengers board a ship although it knew people on a previous voyage had COVID-19 symptoms, ruling that a class action waiver in the passengers' contract is well communicated.

  • October 21, 2020

    Edelson Atty Tapped To Lead In Society Insurance MDL

    A former Illinois state representative and current attorney at Edelson PC has been chosen by policyholders to fight their multidistrict litigation against Society Insurance Co. over COVID-19 business interruption coverage.

  • October 20, 2020

    Texas Judge Calls For Trim Of Suit Over Tribal Bingo Hall Fall

    A Texas magistrate judge recommended dismissal of a Houston man's damages bid for injuries sustained at the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas' bingo hall but said he should be able to continue with a claim over the tribe's alleged lack of a court to bring his suit.

Expert Analysis

  • Law Firm Tips For Attracting, Retaining Attys During Pandemic

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    Steps law firms can take to attract and keep the best lawyers amid the pandemic include diversifying expertise to meet anticipated legal demands, prioritizing firm culture, and preparing for prospective partners' pointed questions, says Brian Burlant at Major Lindsey.

  • Perspectives

    Finding A Path Forward To Regulate The Legal Industry

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    Gerald Knapton at Ropers Majeski analyzes U.S. and U.K. experiments to explore alternative business structures and independent oversight for law firms, which could lead to innovative approaches to increasing access to legal services.

  • Series

    Lawyering While Parenting: A Day In A Dad's Pandemic Life

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    Christopher Jennison shares a view of his life working from home as a Federal Aviation Administration attorney preparing to first-chair a trial while splitting child care responsibilities with his lawyer wife.

  • No-Poach Antitrust Standard Unclear In Franchising

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    The U.S. Department of Justice and federal courts have taken conflicting stances on whether no-poach agreements between franchisors and franchisees are anti-competitive, and there are certain strategies plaintiffs and defendants should consider when navigating ambiguities in the law, say William Reiss and Matthew Geyer at Robins Kaplan.

  • Series

    Lawyering While Parenting: A Day In A Mom's Pandemic Life

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    Josephine Bahn shares a view of her life working from home as an attorney at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation while splitting child care responsibilities with her lawyer husband.

  • 5 Cost-Cutting Strategies For Corporate Legal Departments

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    To achieve long-term reduction in their legal expenses, companies must look beyond law firm hourly rates and better distribute their legal work among high-cost premier firms, low-cost practitioners and alternative legal service providers, and their own in-house teams, says Nathan Wenzel at SimpleLegal.

  • Series

    AGs In A Pandemic: Connors Talks Hawaii Travel Measures

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    Hawaii Attorney General Clare Connors shares how her office created a clear legal framework to assist policymakers in decisions regarding travel-related and other COVID-19 response efforts.

  • Guest Feature

    Preparing The Next Generation Of Female Trial Lawyers

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    To build the ranks of female trial attorneys, law firms must integrate them into every aspect of a case — from witness preparation to courtroom arguments — instead of relegating them to small roles, says Kalpana Srinivasan, co-managing partner at Susman Godfrey.

  • Guest Feature

    Mentorship Is Key To Fixing Drop-Off Of Women In Law

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    It falls to senior male attorneys to recognize the crisis female attorneys face as the pandemic amplifies an already unequal system and to offer their knowledge, experience and counsel to build a better future for women in law, says James Meadows at Culhane Meadows.

  • Calculating FCA Damages From PPP Fraud May Be Tricky

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    The Paycheck Protection Program will undoubtedly give rise to False Claims Act enforcement, but the intangible nature of some contract benefits and differences in contract valuation between the circuits raise uncertainty about damages calculations, say Ellen London at Alto Litigation and Derek Adams at Potomac Law.

  • Guest Feature

    5 Ways Firms Can Avoid Female Atty Exodus During Pandemic

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    The pandemic's disproportionate impact on women presents law firms with a unique opportunity to devise innovative policies that will address the increasing home life demands female lawyers face and help retain them long after COVID-19 is over, say Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan and Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks.

  • What Ohio COVID-19 Liability Shield Means For Employers

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    Because a new Ohio law that shields businesses from civil liability related to COVID-19 provides narrow protections, employers should continue to follow Occupational Safety and Health Administration, state and local guidance to demonstrate reasonable protective measures, says Jeffrey Smith at Fisher Phillips.

  • Insurer-Friendly COVID-19 Case Law Is No Silver Bullet

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    Three recent decisions confirm that individual or consolidated lawsuits regarding insurance coverage for business interruption caused by the pandemic will turn on their own unique circumstances, meaning that insurer-friendly decisions will not preclude coverage broadly, say Jason Rubinstein and Mark Packman at Gilbert.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Fight Voter Suppression This Election Season

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    Lawyers should use their unique skill sets, knowledge and spheres of influence to fight burdensome ID requirements and other voter suppression tactics that may influence the 2020 elections, and to participate in potential post-election litigation, say CK Hoffler and Allyce Bailey at the National Bar Association.

  • Why Online Mediation May Be Here To Stay

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    Videoconferenced mediation offers several advantages and helps cases settle faster and more cordially, making it hard to imagine going back to logistically difficult in-person dispute resolution after COVID-19 restrictions are gone, says Sidney Kanazawa at ARC.

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