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Insurance UK

  • May 17, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week has seen a Kazakhstan lender file fraud claims against a dissolved London-based business, a Dubai airport security equipment company sue Barclays, and Yamaha's motorcycle business file claims against a German insurer. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 17, 2019

    Insurers Settle $323K Fishing Death Coverage Fight

    Insurers Dual Australia and QBE Insurance have settled a £253,000 ($323,000) dispute over the cost of indemnifying an Australian fishing company following an investigation into the death of a sailor on the high seas seven years ago, according to court documents. 

  • May 17, 2019

    Insurance Firms ‘Falling Short’ On EU Rules, FCA Warns

    British insurance firms are flouting European rules aimed at safeguarding consumers, the Financial Conduct Authority has said, warning that it will take action against insurers that fail to identify the needs of their customers.

  • May 17, 2019

    Pensions Watchdog Shows Teeth On Protecting Schemes

    Britain’s pensions regulator has said it will focus over the next three years on ensuring that workplace schemes are protecting their members' funds, after a year of sanctions against rogue companies that have dodged their responsibilities for safeguarding retirement savings.

  • May 17, 2019

    Zurich Can Seek Prison Sentence For Lying Rock Singer

    Swiss insurance giant Zurich can ask a criminal court to imprison an ageing rock-and-roll singer for lying about the underlying causes of his hearing loss in a claim for damages, a London appeals court said Friday.

  • May 16, 2019

    Pensions Regulator Can't Add Valuation Bid To ITV Appeal

    The Court of Appeal rebuffed The Pensions Regulator on Thursday for attempting to squeeze a cross-appeal on valuation into its defense of an enforcement action requiring ITV to plug a troubled pension scheme's funding gap, saying it does not have jurisdiction to entertain the request.

  • May 16, 2019

    BoE Says UK Should Not Be 'Rule-Taker' After Brexit

    The U.K.'s banking supervisor warned Thursday against Britain becoming a "rule-taker" after Brexit, stressing it was important for the country to shape its own rules for the financial services sector.

  • May 16, 2019

    DWP Wins Appeal In State Pension Credit Eligibility Dispute

    An appeals court on Thursday ruled in favor of the U.K.’s Department for Work and Pensions over the assessment of income from a personal pension plan, after concluding that the lower court failed in its interpretation of the State Pension Credit Regulations.

  • May 16, 2019

    MPs Urge Watchdog To Outlaw Pensions Charging 'Scourge'

    Lawmakers have repeated calls for the City watchdog to ban financial advisers from charging clients after they carry out a pension transfer, it was revealed on Thursday, amid fears the practice is fueling a misselling scandal.

  • May 16, 2019

    UK Court Docks Claire’s Claim Over Shipwrecked Goods

    A $615,000 lawsuit filed by Claire’s Stores and its insurer against shipping giant A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S over thousands of cartons of clothing accessories allegedly lost or damaged at sea has been stayed for the second time by a London court, according to a recent court filing.

  • May 16, 2019

    Insurers Tell European Watchdog Not To Meddle In Innovation

    European insurers have told the European Union’s top insurance watchdog that it must not pen regulatory rules that could hurt innovation in the insurance market, as the bloc weighs the opportunities and risks of using “big data” in new products.

  • May 15, 2019

    Regulator Tells Court ITV Must Fund Scheme's £115M Deficit

    The Pensions Regulator urged the Court of Appeal on Wednesday to uphold its enforcement action requiring ITV to give financial support to a troubled pension scheme, saying the broadcaster’s association to the entities that are now unable to meet their financial obligations puts it on the hook.

  • May 15, 2019

    Brokers Say Law Firm Can't Escape Blame For Lease Woes

    Insurance brokers seeking money from a law firm for allegedly fumbling a break clause in a property lease have told a London judge they're having a hard time finding tenants to take over their space because the market for secondhand offices in London is cold. 

  • May 15, 2019

    Brokers Urged To Be Vigilant For Cyber Insurance Flaws

    Brokers that find flaws in the cyber insurance policies offered by insurers must challenge them to ensure that their business customers have the right level of cover, a company that analyzes insurance governance said on Wednesday.

  • May 15, 2019

    UK Regulator Plans Spot-Checks For Pension Law-Breakers

    Britain's pensions watchdog said Wednesday it is cracking down on employers that break the law by flouting their duty to automatically enroll workers in saving schemes, and will carry out a series of targeted inspections over the summer.

  • May 15, 2019

    Clydesdale Group Sets Aside £30M For Insurance Claims

    The owner of Clydesdale Bank said on Wednesday it has earmarked an additional £30 million ($38.5 million) to cover customer complaints about being wrongly sold controversial payment protection insurance as the deadline for making claims approaches.

  • May 15, 2019

    Complaints Against Financial Services Hit Five-Year High

    Complaints against financial services companies have hit a five-year high, the industry’s adjudicator reported on Wednesday, with a huge spike in criticism about so-called payday lenders being blamed for the rise.

  • May 14, 2019

    State Law Doesn't Trump Int'l Arbitration Policy: 5th Circ.

    The Fifth Circuit affirmed on Monday that federal policy relating to international arbitration trumps a Louisiana statute barring arbitration agreements in certain insurance contracts in the state, even when a contract stipulates that it will conform with local state law.

  • May 14, 2019

    Financial Firms' Operations Must Be Outage-Proof, BoE Says

    Banks and insurers must ensure they can continue providing services to their customers and the wider economy if they are infected with cyberattacks or plagued by IT outages, the Bank of England said Tuesday as it proposed revamping its approach to financial resilience.

  • May 14, 2019

    Shipping Insurance Dispute Cries Over Spoiled Milk, Smokes

    A Netherlands dairy distributor, a Kuwaiti insurer and others have filed a £405,600 suit ($524,000) in London court against a Swiss shipping giant over a damaged shipment of cigarettes and milk, according to a recently released court filing.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • 3 Insurance Issues Raised By The Notre Dame Cathedral Fire

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    The devastating Notre Dame Cathedral fire provides a rare opportunity to consider the many unique factors that owners and insurers must consider when insuring national treasures, say attorneys at Zelle.

  • Where The Post-Libor Litigation Tsunami Will Hit

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    The permanent cessation of the Libor rate in 2021 will likely trigger a flood of litigation over many existing contracts that lack effective replacements. Marc Gottridge of Hogan Lovells identifies the types of products that may be most susceptible to disputes.

  • Despite Decline In Cyberattacks, UK Cos. Should Stay Vigilant

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    The U.K. Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport's latest cybersecurity survey shows that U.K. cyberattacks have decreased in the last 12 months, likely thanks in part to the General Data Protection Regulation. But companies' cybersecurity efforts should continue to evolve, say experts at PriceWaterhouseCoopers.

  • UK Antitrust Watchdog Proposals Would Bolster Enforcement

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    The U.K. Competition and Markets Authority's proposals for reshaping competition enforcement and consumer protection would shift the historical balance in U.K. competition policy, increasing regulatory burden on companies while weakening judicial scrutiny of CMA actions, says Bill Batchelor of Skadden.

  • Guest Feature

    Preet Bharara On The Human Factor In The Justice System

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    A key theme in Preet Bharara's new book is the enormous role the human element plays in the administration of justice. The former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York discussed this theme, among other topics, in a recent conversation with White and Williams attorney Randy Maniloff.

  • Considering A More Cost-Effective Future For The SFO

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    In light of multiple recent examples of U.K. Serious Fraud Office investigations yielding far less than the agency may have hoped for, a new approach to prosecuting individuals and corporations may be a smart investment, says Azizur Rahman of Rahman Ravelli.

  • Lessons From Carphone Warehouse's Partial FCA Settlement

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    In the first case decided under the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority's new partial settlement process, Carphone Warehouse demonstrates not only the possible value of cooperating with authorities but also the cost of failing to right previous wrongs, says Syedur Rahman of Rahman Ravelli Solicitors.

  • Collective Redress In The EU: Past, Present And Future

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    Legislative processes harmonizing collective redress throughout the European Union have accelerated, leading to a proposed requirement that all member states establish collective action mechanisms, but some worry that the directive lacks sufficient guarantees against abusive litigation, say Philippe Métais and Elodie Valette of White & Case LLP.

  • Lenders Score Major High Court Victory In Foreclosure Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Wednesday in Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus LLP removes nearly all activities taken by creditors seeking nonjudicial foreclosure of liens and mortgages from the ambit of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says John Baxter of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.