International Trade

  • September 24, 2020

    FDA OKs Import Of Some Prescription Drugs From Canada

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced a final rule Thursday that would allow states, tribes, pharmacists and wholesalers to import certain prescription drugs from Canada, following through on an executive order signed by President Donald Trump in July.

  • September 24, 2020

    US, EU Crack Open Mollusk Trade With Equivalence Deal

    The U.S. and the European Union moved to reopen their markets to each other's shellfish imports, a two-way trade flow that completely shut down in 2010, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  • September 24, 2020

    ITC Clears Intel, Computer Makers In Chip Patent Case

    The U.S. International Trade Commission has backed a judge's finding that Intel, Acer, Lenovo, Asus and Micro-Star did not violate trade laws in a case in which California-based Tela Innovations Inc. accused them of patent infringement.

  • September 24, 2020

    Trump Admin. Asks Trade Court To Pause China Tariff Cases

    The Trump administration has asked the U.S. Court of International Trade to pause litigation in roughly 3,400 suits challenging tariffs on more than $300 billion of Chinese imports until the court decides how to manage the cases.

  • September 24, 2020

    UK Plans To Hit Belarus With Sanctions Over Election

    The U.K. plans to join the U.S. and Canada to levy sanctions against individuals in Belarus accused of violating human rights sanctions after "rigged elections," the British foreign secretary said Thursday.

  • September 24, 2020

    Feds Face 'Extremely Short' Deadline To Argue TikTok Ban

    A D.C. federal judge ordered the Trump administration to respond to TikTok by Friday afternoon if it wants to continue with its planned ban of the popular social media app on Sunday, a deadline the administration's attorneys called "extremely short."

  • September 23, 2020

    TikTok Seeks Quick Block Of Trump's Ban On App Downloads

    TikTok Inc. and its Chinese parent company ByteDance Ltd. urged a D.C. federal court on Wednesday to block the Trump administration's plans to outlaw U.S. downloads of the popular short-form video sharing app while a lawsuit over the ban plays out.

  • September 23, 2020

    ITC Prevails In Court-Reporting Contract Bid Protest

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims upheld the International Trade Commission's decision to partner with a court reporting company with outdated technology, finding that the contractor's "historical" wireless router didn't disqualify it from bidding.

  • September 23, 2020

    COVID-19 Lockdowns Fueled Steep Drop In Global Trade

    Global trade in goods fell off between the first and second quarters of 2020 at a rate unseen since the 2008 financial crisis, as countries went into lockdown to combat the spread of COVID-19, the World Trade Organization reported Wednesday.

  • September 23, 2020

    State Dept. Not Involving Feds In Forming Cyberspace Bureau

    The U.S. Department of State hasn't involved six key federal agencies in the development of its new Bureau of Cyberspace Security and Emerging Technologies, according to a watchdog report recommending that the department involve these agencies in the project.

  • September 23, 2020

    Tesla Joins Tsunami Of Suits Against Trump's China Tariffs

    Tesla Inc. has joined thousands of other businesses suing the Trump administration over tariffs on Chinese imports, demanding the U.S. government end the tariff policy and issue the electric car manufacturer a full refund, with interest, for tariffs paid on U.S. imports of car parts made in China.

  • September 23, 2020

    Feds Say Oil Trader's 'Token Of Appreciation' Was A Bribe

    A Texas oil trader was charged Tuesday in Brooklyn, New York, with paying $870,000 in bribes for his former firm, Vitol Group, to former officials at Ecuador's national petroleum concern — payments he allegedly called a "token of appreciation" for business including a $300 million fuel contract.

  • September 23, 2020

    Trump's New Cuba Sanctions Target Rum, Cigars And Hotels

    The Trump administration on Wednesday rolled out new sanctions against Cuba that will forbid Americans from importing alcohol and tobacco products from the island or staying at hotels owned by the Cuban government.

  • September 22, 2020

    House OKs Bill Barring Chinese Imports Over Forced Labor

    The U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation Tuesday that would block more imports from China's Xinjiang region, in the government's latest effort to punish China for its purported forced labor and mistreatment of Muslims.

  • September 22, 2020

    Fla. Asphalt Co. To Pay $16.6M Over South American Bribes

    A Florida asphalt company will pay $16.6 million in connection with an agreement to plead guilty to paying bribes to state-owned oil companies in South America in exchange for access to government contracts, federal prosecutors in Brooklyn said Tuesday.

  • September 22, 2020

    ITC Will Review Allergan's Win In Botox Trade Secrets Case

    The U.S. International Trade Commission will review the bulk of an administrative law judge's finding that Allergan's rivals should be barred from importing a low-cost version of its Botox treatment because they misappropriated trade secrets.

  • September 22, 2020

    More Than 3,300 Importers Energized To Erase China Tariffs

    A push to undo the bulk of President Donald Trump's tariffs on Chinese goods has swelled to include more than 3,300 lawsuits in the U.S. Court of International Trade as importers pin their hopes on a mostly procedural challenge to invalidate a central pillar of Trump's trade policy.

  • September 22, 2020

    Infringing Luxury Vinyl Tile Imports Blocked From US

    The U.S. International Trade Commission will bar certain luxury vinyl tiles from being imported into the U.S., after verifying a Georgia company's claims that the products infringe its tile designs, according to a Federal Register notice Tuesday.

  • September 22, 2020

    Maduro Fights For Recognition In Appeal Of $1B Gold Battle

    A legal battle over €930 million ($1 billion) of Venezuela's gold stored at the Bank of England returned to the London courts on Tuesday, with the Nicolás Maduro-backed central bank board seeking to overturn a decision recognizing opposition leader Juan Guaidó as the country's president.

  • September 22, 2020

    UK Gives Banks 15-Month Brexit Respite Amid Calls For More

    British financial watchdogs said Tuesday that they have agreed to waive new regulatory rules for banks for 15 months after the Brexit transition period ends in December in order to prevent upheaval to the market, despite lawmakers and the industry calling for two years' worth of relief.

  • September 21, 2020

    Justice Ginsburg: Who She Was, How She Shaped The Law

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday at age 87. Here, Law360 looks at the feminist icon's legacy and the battle brewing over her seat.

  • September 21, 2020

    Law360's The Term: The Life And Legacy Of Justice Ginsburg

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is among the few on the U.S. Supreme Court to have etched her name into legal history long before donning a robe. In a special episode this week, Law360's The Term dives into her legacy as a pioneering women's rights advocate with two guests who worked by her side. 

  • September 21, 2020

    Budding Textualist Star Barbara Lagoa Eyed For High Court

    Known as a budding superstar in Florida conservative legal circles, committed textualist Judge Barbara Lagoa could continue her lightning-quick ascent through the appellate ranks if President Donald Trump taps her for the now-vacant U.S. Supreme Court seat, where she would become the first Cuban-American, and first Floridian, to sit on the high court.

  • September 21, 2020

    McConnell Defends Election-Year Plan To Replace Ginsburg

    The Senate majority leader on Monday defended his plan to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg this year, while the House speaker said the late jurist will become the first woman to lie in state at the Capitol.

  • September 21, 2020

    House Passes Bill Allowing FDA To Seize Counterfeits

    The U.S. House of Representatives on Monday evening passed a bipartisan bill that would give the U.S. Food and Drug Administration the authority to seize counterfeit medical devices and products, including vaccines.

Expert Analysis

  • New 'Buy American' Rules Bear Risks For Prime Contractors

    Author Photo

    A recently proposed Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council rule maximizing the use of American-made goods only applies to a narrow set of procurements, but for prime contractors subject to the Buy American Act, the changes may significantly disrupt supply chains, say Amy Conant Hoang and Erica Bakies at K&L Gates.

  • DOJ Support Of SEP Injunctions Should Stabilize Licensing

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent letter to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, which explicitly supports standard-essential patent owners in their pursuit of injunctive relief and favors a diminished role for antitrust enforcement in intellectual property disputes, bodes well for rebalancing the licensing market, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • A Road Map For Drafting Persuasive Discovery Motions

    Author Photo

    Best practices that can help litigators write convincing discovery motions include thinking about the audience, addressing a few key questions, and leaving out boilerplate from supporting briefs, says Tom Connally at Hogan Lovells.

  • How Congress Can Depoliticize The Supreme Court

    Author Photo

    Congress has multiple means to take the politics out of federal judicial nominations and restore the independence of the U.S. Supreme Court — three of which can be implemented without a constitutional amendment, says Franklin Amanat at DiCello Levitt.

  • Opinion

    The Case For A Nonpolitical Federal Judiciary

    Author Photo

    For the last 20 years, at the insistence of both parties, U.S. Supreme Court nominations have been fierce ideological battles — which is bad for the country and bad for the public's perception of the legitimacy of the court, say Judge Eric Moyé, Judge Craig Smith and Winston & Strawn partner Tom Melsheimer.

  • A Close Look At CFIUS' New Critical Tech Reporting Rule

    Author Photo

    A recently finalized rule from the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, aligning transaction reporting requirements with export control regulations for critical technology, brings several new considerations for buyers and sellers, says Zlatko Hadzismajlovic at McCarter & English.

  • Trump's Drug Pricing Order Is More Bark Than Bite

    Author Photo

    President Donald Trump's new executive order addressing pricing for drugs covered by Medicare Parts B and D glosses over enormous difficulties in restructuring Medicare operations and is unlikely to lead to any imminent changes, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • The Keys To A Better Privilege Logging Paradigm

    Author Photo

    Current privilege logging practices to identify what information is being withheld from discovery often lead to costly disputes, so practitioners should adopt a system based on trust and good faith, similar to the presumptions embedded in the business judgment rule for corporate directors and officers, say Kevin Brady at Volkswagen and Charles Ragan and Ted Hiser at Redgrave.

  • White House Due Process Memo Could Reform Enforcement

    Author Photo

    A little-noticed memo recently issued by the Trump administration in response to the pandemic, directing federal agencies to provide greater due process to individuals and companies under regulatory investigation, represents a long-overdue sea change in the way justice is carried out in enforcement proceedings, say Joan Meyer and Norman Bloch at Thompson Hine.

  • What Shifting FCPA Enforcement Means For Financial Cos.

    Author Photo

    In this brief video, Tom Firestone and Daniela Fonseca Puggina at Baker McKenzie analyze how Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement is placing greater emphasis on bribe recipients, and what this trend means for financial institutions and their know-your-customer policies and practices.

  • Law Firm Hiring Considerations In A COVID-19 Economy

    Author Photo

    Financially robust law firms are entering the recruiting market aggressively knowing that dislocations like the COVID-19 crisis present rare competitive opportunities, and firms that remain on the sidelines when it comes to strategic hiring will be especially vulnerable to having their best talent poached, says Brian Burlant at Major Lindsey.

  • Fashion Industry Adaptations Amid Trade War, Pandemic

    Author Photo

    The trade war with China and the global pandemic have created a Darwinian moment for the fashion industry, in which brands that diversify their supply chains, carefully monitor classification of their imported goods, and update their contracts are most likely to survive, say Danielle Garno and Heather Marx at Cozen O’Connor.

  • Self-Disclosure Trends In FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy

    Author Photo

    A review of 41 actions undertaken since the U.S. Department Justice's Foreign Corrupt Practices Act corporate enforcement policy was introduced four years ago reveals that the DOJ and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission consistently reward timely self-disclosure and full cooperation, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Opinion

    Lawyers Must Act To Preserve Democracy This Election

    Author Photo

    COVID-19 concerns and glaring gaps in registration threaten to dampen voter turnout in the 2020 election, so attorneys should take on the problem by leveraging their knowledge and resources in seven ways, says Laura Brill at Kendall Brill.

  • Bill Curtailing NPE Suits At ITC Could Restructure Licensing

    Author Photo

    Though unlikely to pass, the pending Advancing America's Interests Act, which would counter nonpracticing entities' abuse of process at the U.S. International Trade Commission, could potentially reshape future patent licensing negotiations and render exclusion orders more in line with district courts injunctions, say Matt Rizzolo and Brendan McLaughlin at Ropes & Gray.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!