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International Trade

  • April 25, 2019

    W.Va. Man Gets 6 Months For Lying About Iran Scooter Exports

    A 72-year-old man from West Virginia faces prison time for lying about exporting electric scooters to Iran, the U.S. Department of Justice said Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2019

    Auto Parts Buyers Reach $3.25M Deal In Taiwan Price-Fix Suit

    A class of car-part direct purchasers on Tuesday said it struck a deal with a Taiwanese parts maker to wrap up a lawsuit over alleged price-fixing on certain aftermarket sheet metal products, resolving their claims in Wisconsin federal court for $3.25 million.

  • April 24, 2019

    Enviros Ask 9th Circ. Not To Dismiss Keystone XL Challenge

    Environmental groups said President Donald Trump’s move to issue a new permit for the Keystone XL pipeline does not mean that the Ninth Circuit should dismiss the case and throw out a lower court’s order enjoining construction.

  • April 24, 2019

    Chinese Steel Nails Were Dumped, Commerce Says

    The U.S. Department of Commerce on Wednesday handed down final tariffs on steel nails imported from China after finding that the nails were sold in the U.S. at unfairly low prices.

  • April 24, 2019

    Chinese Cos. Hit With Tariffs On Refrigerant Imports

    The U.S. Department of Commerce has found that a Chinese exporter has sold refrigerant chemical blends in the U.S. at unfairly low prices, setting the same dumping rate for other Chinese companies under review, according to a notice to be published Thursday in the Federal Register.

  • April 24, 2019

    Commerzbank's £39M Shipping Claim Stayed Until November

    A court in London has halted proceedings brought by German banking giant Commerzbank against an Iranian and Indian shipping company, which the lender alleges has defaulted on a loan worth nearly $76 million.

  • April 23, 2019

    2 Men With China Ties Indicted In GE Trade Secret Theft

    A New York federal court unsealed an indictment Tuesday naming two individuals — an ex-engineer and a businessman — in an alleged plot to steal GE's steam turbine trade secrets for the Chinese government, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • April 23, 2019

    11th Circ. Affirms $29M Del Monte Award Over Pineapple Deal

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday confirmed a $29.3 million arbitration award that had been issued to a Monaco-based Del Monte unit following a dispute with a Costa Rican pineapple plantation, rejecting arguments that a lower court lacked jurisdiction under U.S. code dealing with international arbitration.

  • April 23, 2019

    NJ Defense Contractor Cops To $1.8M Aircraft Parts Scam

    A New Jersey military contractor on Tuesday copped to duping the government into paying $1.8 million for aircraft supplies that weren’t up to scratch in a 12-year scheme that also involved the man illegally accessing sensitive military documents, federal prosecutors said.

  • April 23, 2019

    Feds Seek $4M From Mexican Co. Accused Of Bank Fraud

    The federal government has accused a Mexican farming equipment company of forging documents and hiding its common ownership with a U.S. exporter to procure loans, telling a D.C. federal court that it is entitled to more than $4 million in treble damages.

  • April 23, 2019

    Public Factors Must Be Part Of Forum Analyses: 11th Circ.

    District courts must consider all relevant public factors when weighing arguments about the most convenient location for a case, even when the private factors lean one way, the Eleventh Circuit said Monday in a decision reinstating a Florida company's lawsuit over blueberry shipments to a Dutch wholesaler.

  • April 23, 2019

    Taiwan Cos. Ask Fed. Circ. To Undo Steel Duty Tie-Up

    Taiwanese steel manufacturers have urged the Federal Circuit to reverse the U.S. Department of Commerce’s decision to collapse the companies to calculate a combined anti-dumping duty margin, arguing that there is insufficient evidence that they met all the criteria to be considered a single entity.

  • April 23, 2019

    US Wants In On Europe's Case Against Indian Tech Tariffs

    The Trump administration has asked to observe the European Union’s World Trade Organization case targeting India’s tariffs on various high-tech goods, according to a WTO document published Tuesday, citing the U.S. as a top exporter of the goods at issue in the dispute.

  • April 22, 2019

    Businesses Want Tariffs Scrapped Under US-China Trade Pact

    More than 150 business groups from a wide array of sectors on Monday issued sweeping demands to the Trump administration as it aims to wrap up its trade negotiations with China, including the removal of all tariffs imposed by the U.S. and Beijing over the past year.

  • April 22, 2019

    Iranian Electronics Co. Urges Court To Lift Sanctions

    An Iranian electronics company on Sunday urged the D.C. federal court not to dismiss its suit challenging the Office of Foreign Assets Control's decision to leave sanctions in place against the company, arguing that the agency improperly relied on secret evidence when it denied the company’s bid for reconsideration.

  • April 22, 2019

    Trade Court Raps Metal Importer For Unpaid Flange Duties

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Monday ordered a Texas importer to hand over unpaid duties and penalties on a shipment of steel flanges from India, closing the book on a case that involved a "tangled web of changing stories and disputed consequences."

  • April 22, 2019

    Skadden Vet Tapped To Replace USTR's Departing Top Atty

    The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative announced Monday that general counsel Stephen P. Vaughn is set to leave the agency “in the coming weeks” and will be replaced by Skadden partner Joseph L. Barloon.

  • April 22, 2019

    Caterpillar Can't Ax Road Milling Machine Patent At ITC

    The U.S. International Trade Commission mostly struck down Caterpillar Inc.’s efforts to invalidate one of the patents held by the American arm of a German construction machinery company, according to a notice to be published Tuesday in the Federal Register.

  • April 22, 2019

    Trump Tees Up New Sanctions For Iran's Oil Customers

    The Trump administration said Monday it would soon impose sanctions on companies purchasing oil from Iran by removing waivers that had allowed certain countries to stay in business with Tehran.

  • April 19, 2019

    State Dept. Eases Gov't Arms Export Restrictions

    The U.S. Department of State expanded an exemption from arms export licensing requirements for federal agencies in a final rule published Friday, allowing the exemption to cover not only temporary exports but also permanent exports and those made by third parties on behalf of the government.

Expert Analysis

  • Rebuttal

    Jury Trials, Though In Decline, Are Well Worth Preserving

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    In a recent Law360 guest article, the author applauded the disappearance of jury trials as an inefficient, costly mechanism, but in doing so he overlooked the greater value of jury trials for our justice system, says Stephen Susman, executive director of the Civil Jury Project at NYU School of Law.

  • A Broader View Of The US Supreme Court Bar

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    During the past 15 years, three widely read articles bolstered by starstruck media have promulgated the incorrect perception — sorely in need of revision — that the U.S. Supreme Court bar is limited to a handful of elite lawyers, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • How Treaties Protect Investors When Clean Energy Regs Shift

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    When changes in clean energy regulations lead to investor disputes, domestic companies may be limited to challenging regulatory changes in local courts, but investors from abroad can often seek remedies under international law, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • Opinion

    Jury Trials Are In Decline For Good Reason

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    A recent Law360 article reported on federal judges bemoaning jury trials' nationwide decline, but these laments are unfounded as jury trials have been replaced by better alternatives, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research.

  • Reverse FCA Cases Rise With 'America First' Trade Policies

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    Though the number of reverse False Claims Act suits alleging importers made false customs declarations will likely keep increasing given the Trump administration's protectionist policies, importers can take steps to mitigate their risks, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Few Avenues To Protection For Foreign FCPA Whistleblowers

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in Wadler v. Bio-Rad falls within a larger pattern of federal courts interpreting whistleblower protection statutes narrowly — especially when employees raise allegations about international business and potential Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations abroad, say Daniel Wendt and Amelia Hairston-Porter of Miller & Chevalier.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Circuitous Path To The Law

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    Instead of going to college after high school, I followed in my father’s footsteps and became an electrician. Later I became an electrical engineer, and then an IP attorney. Every twist and turn along the way has made me a better lawyer, says Joseph Maraia of Burns & Levinson.

  • Getting Compliance Right When There Are No Regulations

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    Recent enforcement actions and agency guidance illustrate how the federal government sets expectations for corporate compliance internal controls, even when no formal regulations have been issued. But companies must know where to find the relevant information, says Jo Ritcey-Donohue of JRD Law.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Conrad Reviews 'The Jury Crisis'

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    In "The Jury Crisis," jury consultant and social psychologist Drury Sherrod spotlights the vanishing jury trial, providing a fascinating canary-in-the-coal-mine warning for lawyers, litigants and society at large, says U.S. District Judge Robert Conrad of the Western District of North Carolina.

  • Working With Foreign Parties In Real Estate Transactions

    Excerpt from Lexis Practice Advisor
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    As more and more U.S. real estate is bought and sold by foreign investors, it is becoming increasingly important for real estate attorneys to understand the added complexities that may arise in transactions involving foreign parties, say Spencer Compton of First American Title Insurance Company and attorney Diane Schottenstein.