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International Trade

  • June 19, 2019

    Microsoft, Tech Giants Oppose Trump Tablet, Laptop Tariffs

    Microsoft Corp., Dell Technologies, HP Inc. and Intel Corp. joined forces Wednesday to oppose the Trump administration's proposal to include tablets and laptop computers in its list of Chinese goods targeted for tariffs.

  • June 19, 2019

    USTR Up To Restart Talks With China As Tariff Threat Looms

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said on Wednesday that the U.S. would be willing to restart negotiations with China, as President Donald Trump prepares to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the upcoming G-20 Summit.

  • June 19, 2019

    Huawei Judge Will Hear Sidley Atty DQ Bid In Fall

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday set a September date to hear arguments over whether to disqualify a former U.S. deputy attorney general turned Sidley Austin LLP partner from representing Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. in its fight against charges including bank fraud and sanctions violations.

  • June 19, 2019

    USTR Says Mexico's NAFTA 2.0 Labor Rules Can Be Enforced

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer assured lawmakers Wednesday morning that Mexico would honor its newly passed labor laws as required by the renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement, as House Democrats pressed the trade ambassador on how this new version of the trilateral deal would be enforced.

  • June 19, 2019

    Conspiracy To Bribe Haitian Officials Was Explicit, Jury Hears

    Recorded conversations involving two men who were pursuing an $84 million port project in Haiti offer clear evidence that they intended to bribe government officials in exchange for approvals, a prosecutor told jurors in Massachusetts federal court Wednesday as a seven-day trial concluded.

  • June 19, 2019

    Cuban Hotel Owners Sue Trivago Over Confiscated Property

    The heirs of the owner of a Cuban hotel filed a proposed class suit Tuesday against Expedia Inc. subsidiary Trivago GmbH, claiming the online booking company has unlawfully profited from their property, which was confiscated by Fidel Castro's government after the Cuban Revolution.

  • June 19, 2019

    Starks To Hold Forum On Huawei Replacement Next Week

    Amid growing concern that foreign-made broadband equipment poses a security risk to American telecommunications networks, FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks on Wednesday said he will host a forum next week examining how to weed out and replace existing components that might be compromised.

  • June 19, 2019

    MoFo Launches Latin America Desk With New Miami Office

    Morrison & Foerster LLP launched a new Latin America desk Wednesday to build out its capabilities in the region, as it officially opened its Miami office with nine Latin America-focused transactional attorneys from Greenberg Traurig LLP.

  • June 19, 2019

    PTAB Says ITC Case Doesn't Bar Dental Patent Challenge

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board on Tuesday agreed to review an Align Technology Inc. patent covering a teeth imaging device after it was challenged by a Danish rival, rejecting Align’s argument that the rival got an unfair leg up because the companies have already faced off in a related case at the U.S. International Trade Commission.

  • June 18, 2019

    Menendez Spars With USTR Over Trump's Mexico Tariff Threat

    Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer clashed on Tuesday over the Trump administration's now-abandoned threat to set tariffs on Mexico to stem the flow of immigrants into the U.S., with the lawmaker questioning the use of duties to address nontrade issues.

  • June 18, 2019

    Suspect Says US Can’t Charge Him With $2B Fraud In Africa

    A Lebanese salesman told a New York federal judge that the U.S. government has yet to show how it is related with $2 billion in allegedly fraudulent loans backed by the government of Mozambique.

  • June 18, 2019

    Rubio Targets Huawei Patent Suits Through Defense Bill

    Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., has filed a measure to block companies on certain U.S. national security watch lists, including Huawei, from bringing patent litigation in the U.S. court system, days after Huawei signaled it wants Verizon to pay for hundreds of technology licenses.

  • June 18, 2019

    Lighthizer Defends Trump's Aggressive China Strategy

    A number of U.S. senators criticized the Trump administration's escalating tariff campaign against China on Tuesday, but U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said the moves were necessary to counter the serious problems posed by Beijing's intellectual property and technology transfer rules.

  • June 18, 2019

    Trump Confirms Trade Meeting With Xi On G-20 Sidelines

    President Donald Trump on Tuesday confirmed he will hold a meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at this month's Group of 20 leading rich and developing nations summit to discuss the two countries' fractious trade relationship.

  • June 18, 2019

    USTR Pledges Close Work With Congress To Pass NAFTA 2.0

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said Tuesday that he will work with congressional Democrats to allay their fears about the revised North American Free Trade Agreement, vowing to tackle criticisms of the accord's labor, environmental and drug-pricing rules to get it ratified.

  • June 18, 2019

    Even With Green Light, Cuban Property Recovery Isn't Easy

    Multinational hospitality companies are squarely in the litigation crosshairs now that the Trump administration has allowed litigation over property seized by Fidel Castro's government, but attorneys say the tangled international nature of these suits will be costly to prosecute and any judgments will be more difficult to enforce than it may seem.

  • June 18, 2019

    UK Gov't Settles £1.25B Iranian Bank Claim Over Sanctions

    The U.K. government has settled a £1.25 billion ($1.6 billion) lawsuit brought against it by Bank Mellat over damages related to its enforcement of nuclear sanctions, which were later struck down, lawyers for the Iranian bank told a London court Tuesday.

  • June 17, 2019

    Spanish Hotel Co. Meliá Hit With Suit Over Cuban Properties

    A Cuban-American family has opened up a new front for litigation over Cuban properties confiscated by Fidel Castro's government with a €10 million ($11.2 million) lawsuit that uses Spanish civil law against Meliá Hotels International over two of its properties that the family says are on land where they once had a sugar mill.

  • June 17, 2019

    Investment Biz Partners' Fraud Suit Spirals Into 'Food Fight'

    A New York state judge on Monday decried how a fraud lawsuit between onetime infrastructure investment partners and law school friends devolved into a “food fight,” directing them to a referee for their discovery disputes.

  • June 17, 2019

    In The Trade Hot Seat: What Congress May Ask Lighthizer

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is in for a busy couple of days. He is slated to testify before House and Senate committees this week, where he is likely to face stern questioning from both sides of the aisle about the administration’s China strategy, a contentious trade deal vote and scores of other hot-button trade issues. Here, Law360 breaks down what to look for as lawmakers roll up their sleeves with the USTR.

  • June 17, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Upholds ITC Ban On Hyosung ATM Imports

    The International Trade Commission rightly banned Hyosung TNS Inc.’s ATM imports after finding that the South Korean company infringed a Diebold Nixdorf Inc. patent, the Federal Circuit said Monday.

  • June 17, 2019

    Huawei Can't Cut Redactions In Feds' Bid To DQ Sidley Atty

    A New York federal judge has ruled that prosecutors can largely keep in place the redactions in a motion to disqualify a former deputy attorney general, now with Sidley Austin LLP, from representing Chinese technology company Huawei against claims it was deceptive about its dealings in Iran.

  • June 17, 2019

    S. Korean Co. Wasn't Dumping Copper Alloy, Commerce Says

    The U.S. Department of Commerce has declined to impose tariffs on a South Korean exporter of phosphor copper after finding it did not sell copper in the U.S. at an unfair value, according to a notice published Monday in the Federal Register.

  • June 14, 2019

    Int'l Court Nixes UAE Request In Qatar Blockade Fight

    The United Arab Emirates on Friday failed to persuade the International Court of Justice to prevent Qatar from escalating a dispute over an allegedly discriminatory and harmful blockade the larger country imposed after accusing Qatar of funding terrorist groups.

  • June 14, 2019

    Trump Under Corporate Pressure To End China Trade War

    More than 660 American companies and industry associations — including Walmart, Target, Macy’s and other major retailers — urged President Donald Trump to resolve his administration’s trade dispute with China, as the president’s threat to slap tariffs on $300 billion worth of Chinese goods hangs in the balance.

Expert Analysis

  • How New US M&A Restrictions On China Will Affect Tech Cos.

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    The Trump administration recently launched an unprecedented regulatory blitz designed to further protect domestic information and communications technology and services from what it considers Chinese threats. These steps will constrain transactions that could expand China’s access to the U.S. market and to U.S. technology — and some have an immediate effect, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • DOJ's Citgo Case Highlights Reach, And Limits, Of FCPA

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    The bribes a Miami businessman recently admitted paying to executives of gasoline retailer Citgo violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, because Citgo is owned by the Venezuelan government. But there is scant case law for the U.S. Department of Justice to rely on in a case against Citgo itself, says Timothy Belevetz of Ice Miller.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Can Improve Their Job Interviews

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    When evaluating potential new hires, law firms should utilize structured interviews in order to create a consistent rating system that accurately and effectively assesses candidates' skills and competencies, says Jennifer Henderson of Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.

  • Law Firms Can Do Better With Their Mentoring Programs

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    There are a few practical, proactive steps law firms can take to create a mentoring program that pays dividends — instead of creating a mediocre program that both parties see as an obligation, says Kate Sheikh of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • The Latest Developments In Criminal Cases Against Execs

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    This spring, there was some noteworthy news in white collar government investigations impacting executives, including the first successful prosecution in the opioid bribery scheme and the first criminal charges for failure to report under the Consumer Product Safety Act, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 'Rocket Docket' Justifies Its Name For 11th Straight Year

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    The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia “rocket docket” is still the fastest federal civil trial court in the country despite some recent trends causing its median time to trial to grow to 13.2 months, says Robert Tata of Hunton.

  • Opinion

    FARA Enforcement Is No Slam-Dunk For Prosecutors

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    What support is there for the government’s recent theories of criminal liability under the Foreign Agents Registration Act? There are two possibilities, neither of which stands up to scrutiny, says Jay Nanavati of Kostelanetz & Fink.

  • 5 Key Issues In Acquiring Transportation Infrastructure Assets

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    There is a growing trend of governmental agencies contracting and leasing viable operating transportation infrastructure assets. Such opportunities for the private sector may exist in connection with any contemplated upgrade, extension or other modification of an asset that a governmental entity needs to finance, say José Morán and Juan Gonzalez of Baker McKenzie. 

  • China's Amended Investment Law Leaves Some Details Vague

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    China's recently amended Foreign Investment Law promises outside investors a more stable, transparent and predictable investment environment in China. But concerns remain that the law was rushed through to ease trade tensions, and that some of its provisions are not clearly defined, says Yuanyou Yang of Duane Morris.

  • Measuring The Value Of A Law Firm's Social Media Efforts

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    Most legal marketers struggle to show the return on investment of their social media efforts, but establishing and answering several key questions can help demonstrate exactly how social media programs contribute to a law firm's bottom line, say Guy Alvarez of Good2bSocial and communications consultant Tom Orewyler.

  • Reports On USMCA Offer Industry-Specific Guidance For Cos.

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    Recent reports from the International Trade Commission and the U.S. Trade Representative have assessed the likely impacts of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement on the U.S. economy. By reviewing the reports' predictions for their industries, companies can be better prepared in case the USMCA is ratified, say Francesca Guerrero and Kayla Toney of Winston & Strawn.

  • Despite Amarin, ITC May Be Right Prescription For Pharma

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    While the Federal Circuit recently concluded that Amarin Pharma’s Lanham Act claims at the U.S. International Trade Commission were precluded by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, this is a narrow exception to the ITC's broad jurisdiction, say Kecia Reynolds and Alton Hare of Pillsbury.

  • Dehumidifier Case Offers Guidance On CPSA Compliance

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    In a first-of-its-kind criminal prosecution under the Consumer Product Safety Act, the U.S. Department of Justice recently charged corporate executives for failure to report defective dehumidifiers to regulators. The possibility of criminal charges should ratchet up executives' vigilance regarding CPSA reporting requirements, say Holly Drumheller Butler and Dwight Stone of Miles & Stockbridge.

  • Japan's Whaling Plans Risk Int'l Trade Pushback

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    After a decade of international litigation, Japan recently announced it would withdraw from the International Whaling Commission and resume commercial whaling in its own waters. But the legal wrangling may not be over, and Japan's move could have consequences for international trade, says Timothy Nelson of Skadden.