International Trade

  • August 21, 2019

    Top EU Data Privacy Watchdog Buttarelli Dies

    Giovanni Buttarelli, who as Europe's data protection supervisor was an influential adviser in shaping the bloc's privacy laws, has died at the age of 62, his office said Wednesday.

  • August 20, 2019

    Trump Calls Off Danish Summit Amid Friction Over Greenland

    President Donald Trump on Tuesday called off his scheduled meeting with Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen in light of Frederiksen’s unwillingness to discuss selling the autonomous territory of Greenland to the U.S. government.

  • August 20, 2019

    Man Defied US Export Laws, Sent Machines To Iran, Feds Say

    Federal authorities have accused an Iranian resident of violating U.S. export bans by shipping computer-controlled machines from the United States and routing them through the United Arab Emirates to Iran, charging him in California federal court with smuggling, money laundering and a bevy of other criminal allegations.

  • August 20, 2019

    Zimmer Urges ITC To Block Rival's Bone Cements From US

    Zimmer Biomet is pressing the International Trade Commission to block German rival Heraeus Medical from bringing certain bone cement products into the United States, claiming its competitor is marketing those products using trade secrets obtained by pilfering Zimmer employees.

  • August 20, 2019

    Pool Co.'s Finished Goods Free From Steel Dumping Tariffs

    A company’s finished pool products are not subject to U.S. Department of Commerce anti-dumping duty orders on corrosion-resistant steel products from Italy and China, the Court of International Trade said Tuesday.

  • August 20, 2019

    ITC Greenlights Duties On Chinese Steel Racks

    The federal government will move forward with duties as high as 144.5% on steel racks imported from China after the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled Tuesday that the imports were injuring American producers.

  • August 19, 2019

    9th Circ. Backs Conviction In $6M 5-Hour Energy Fraud

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Monday upheld a California federal judge's move to allow civil deposition testimony in a criminal case in which a married couple was charged with running a $6 million scheme to sell fake 5-Hour Energy products, saying that the inclusion of two witnesses' statements after they invoked the Fifth Amendment was lawful.

  • August 19, 2019

    Brother Urges ITC To Ban Imports Of Copycat Cartridges

    Brother Industries Ltd. on Monday accused a slew of rivals of shipping toner cartridges that rip off its intellectual property from China into the U.S.

  • August 19, 2019

    US-UK Trade Deal Shouldn't Imperil Irish Peace Pact: Schumer

    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Monday that any post-Brexit trade agreement with the United Kingdom should not undercut a 1998 accord that helped bring an end to the bloody feud between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

  • August 19, 2019

    Ex-Alstom Exec Can't Dodge Charges Despite 'Close' Call

    A former Alstom SA executive lost a bid to dismiss foreign bribery charges on Monday over years of delay, although a Connecticut federal judge said the case was a "close" one that illustrates the difficulty of deciding when a case is so old that it violates a defendant's right to a speedy trial.

  • August 19, 2019

    Trade Court Scraps US Importer's Duty Suit As Too Early

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Monday tossed a Chicago-based roller bearing importer’s challenge to a U.S. Department of Commerce ruling that heavy tariffs applied to its supplier, saying that the lawsuit is premature.

  • August 19, 2019

    Facebook, Amazon Blast French Digital Tax In USTR Hearing

    Representatives from Facebook, Amazon and Google said complying with a new French digital services tax will present significant challenges, including creating new measures to track individual user data, while testifying at a U.S. trade representative public hearing Monday.

  • August 19, 2019

    Commerce Extends Huawei Reprieve For US Companies

    U.S. companies have 90 days to stop doing business with Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, according to a Monday announcement that gives companies more time to wean themselves off the firm after the White House designated it a national security threat.

  • August 19, 2019

    Feds Beef Up Boustani Indictment Before Dismissal Args

    Federal prosecutors filed a new indictment in the Mozambique corruption case against Lebanese salesman Jean Boustani on Monday, days ahead of a hearing on Boustani’s claim that the case should be dismissed for lacking a connection to the U.S.

  • August 16, 2019

    Latin American Airline Avianca Reveals Internal FCPA Probe

    Latin American airline company Avianca Holdings SA on Thursday said it voluntarily disclosed to the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that it is conducting an internal investigation into whether it violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

  • August 16, 2019

    Trump's Greenland Folly: 'Not As Simple As Buying A Resort'

    President Donald Trump spent decades affixing his name to flashy properties, but his reported interest in purchasing the autonomous territory of Greenland — while legally feasible — would be fraught with logistical, political and pragmatic hurdles.

  • August 16, 2019

    Lawmakers Back $8B Fighter Jet Sale To Taiwan

    A bipartisan group of lawmakers praised the Trump administration Friday for approving an $8 billion sale of F-16 fighter jets to Taiwan, saying the move would help to counter increasingly aggressive military actions by China.

  • August 16, 2019

    Chinese Cos. Cited In Chlorine Probe, Spanish Co. Cleared

    Two Chinese companies sold chlorine products used as disinfectant at less than normal value, while a Spanish company was cleared of the same violation, according to U.S. Department of Commerce notices released Friday.

  • August 16, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Is Asked To Shackle Trump's Tariff Power

    The libertarian Cato Institute and a walnut farm have backed a challenge to the constitutionality of the Cold War-era statute the Trump administration has used to set national security tariffs, saying the law is an improper abdication of congressional authority over trade.

  • August 16, 2019

    2 S. Korean Steel Cos. Escape US Duties In Subsidy Case

    The U.S. Department of Commerce declined Friday to impose duties on Hyundai Steel Co. and another South Korean steel producer, finding the subsidies they received from their government for some steel plates in 2017 were too low to warrant tariffs.

  • August 16, 2019

    CIT Mostly OKs Gov't's Methods To Tee Up Chinese Foil Duties

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Thursday largely upheld the government’s methodology for calculating duties on imported aluminum foil from China, refusing most of a Chinese producer’s bid to undo a double-digit tariff tagged on its products.

  • August 16, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week has seen one of Italy's largest banks sue Venice over a derivatives contract, a U.K. investment manager continue its commission fee dispute with a broker and a U.S.-based fund manager hit Argentina with a securities claim. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • August 15, 2019

    Trial-Heavy Fall Will Test FCPA Unit, Shape Law

    Prosecutors from the U.S. Department of Justice's Foreign Corrupt Practices Act unit are set to try six cases this October, an unprecedented boom that will require prosecutors to multitask and may give courts more chances to interpret foreign-bribery law.

  • August 15, 2019

    China Vows To Counter Planned US Tariff On $300B Of Goods

    China pledged Thursday to strike back against the White House's plan to impose a new 10% tariff on roughly $300 billion worth of Chinese goods, saying the duties violate an agreement between President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping.

  • August 15, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: ChemChina, SIX Swiss Exchange, Revlon

    ChemChina is reportedly laying the groundwork to float Syngenta, SIX Swiss Exchange is considering snapping up a bourse in the European Union, and Revlon has tapped Goldman Sachs as the company explores strategic options.

Expert Analysis

  • What 2 Recent OFAC Cases Say About Compliance Priorities

    Author Photo

    Findings of violation issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control earlier this month to U.S. companies DNI Express Shipping and Southern Cross Aviation are illustrative of the continued focus, by OFAC and other agencies, on completeness and accuracy in both responsive and voluntary disclosures, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

  • Crisis Messaging To Protect Law Firm Brand And Bottom Line

    Author Photo

    When crises occur, such as data security incidents or gender bias suits, a well-prepared law firm has a thoroughly tested communications plan at the ready, which ensures the firm is the most proactive news source, prevents the crisis from escalating and notifies stakeholders about mitigation efforts, says Zach Olsen at Infinite Global.

  • The Escalating Sanctions Against Venezuela, Russia And Iran

    Author Photo

    The past few weeks saw a flurry of activity demonstrating that imposition and enforcement of economic sanctions against Venezuela, Russia and Iran — and by extension China — continues to be a key driver for the Trump administration in confronting foreign policy challenges, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Perspectives

    What You Should Know About Courtroom Closures

    Author Photo

    At attorney Greg Craig’s trial in D.C. federal court this week, the courtroom was cleared so prospective jurors could answer sensitive questions. Even seasoned litigators were left wondering about the nature of this subtle, yet significant, issue involving Sixth Amendment public trial rights, says Luke Cass at Quarles & Brady.

  • Next US Move Against Iran Could Block Humanitarian Aid

    Author Photo

    If the U.S. government uses its anti-money laundering authority under the USA Patriot Act to further isolate Iran, the consequences are likely to extend far beyond the purported aim of ensuring the exclusion of Iranian banks from the international financial system, says Jeremy Paner at Ferrari & Associates.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Seaweed Scientist's Odyssey

    Author Photo

    In the early 1980s, I was working on my Ph.D. in marine biology and ecology. As part of an international team of scientists studying oil spill impacts on marine ecosystems, I saw a niche opportunity to combine science and law, says Andrew Davis of Shipman & Goodwin.

  • Mistakes Vs. Falsehoods In Trade Controls Submissions

    Author Photo

    Federal regulators have dramatically increased the number of economic sanctions enforcement actions this year — with many investigations focusing on whether companies have made false statements in submissions. There are seven key steps that companies can take to keep trade submissions accurate and reduce criminal liability, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Key Takeaways For Investors From India's New Budget

    Author Photo

    The 2019-2020 Indian budget, announced in early July, demonstrates clear political desire to attract foreign investors by relaxing investment restrictions in the aviation, media, insurance and retail sectors, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Opinion

    Clients Benefit From Law Firm Expense Growth

    Author Photo

    Although there continue to be corporate clients who are seduced by the idea that cheapest is always best when it comes to outside counsel, there are many negative implications on service delivery that result from myopically focusing only on cost reduction at the expense of quality and innovation, says Keith Maziarek at Katten Muchin.

  • Federal Courts Shed Light On Extraterritorial Reach Of DTSA

    Author Photo

    Recently, federal courts in California and Texas applied Section 1837(2) of the Defend Trade Secrets Act to civil claims for foreign misappropriation, demonstrating that foreign actors should now be cognizant that courts are willing to apply the Economic Espionage Act’s extraterritorial reach to civil DTSA claims, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • How New Executive Order Strengthens Venezuela Sanctions

    Author Photo

    Tuesday’s executive order extending economic sanctions against Venezuela by prohibiting transactions with the Venezuelan government will be, in its practical application, very similar to the complete embargoes the U.S. maintains against entire countries such as Cuba, Iran, Syria and North Korea, says Grant Leach and Cortney Morgan of Husch Blackwell.

  • Opinion

    Changing Ethics Rules Is Key To Law Firm Innovation

    Author Photo

    As demonstrated by the California bar proposal to allow nonlawyers to invest in law firms, we can change the legal ethics rules in a way that protects clients while permitting firms to innovate and serve clients better, say Todd Richheimer of ​​​​​​​Lawfty and Peter Joy of Washington University Law School.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Castillo Reviews 'Raising The Bar'

    Author Photo

    A timely new book, “Raising the Bar: Diversifying Big Law," is one of the first honest assessments of the challenging battleground for people of color at large law firms, and I hope that firm management committee members read it, says U.S. District Judge Rubén Castillo of the Northern District of Illinois.

  • Perspectives

    2nd Circ.'s Approach To Bail Is Backward

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit's decision in United States v. Boustani correctly identifies the dangers of a "two-tiered" bail system, but the proper solution is to make bail more accessible to everyone, not to fewer people, says Alexander Klein of Barket Epstein.

  • A Road Map For A Cryptocurrency Crackdown: Part 2

    Author Photo

    As cryptocurrency usage proliferates, proper regulation should include enforcing money transmitter registration for crypto financial intermediaries, prosecuting crypto intermediaries that violate federal trade requirements, and compelling them to identify those who fail to pay crypto-related capital gains taxes, says cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark.