Legal Ethics

  • December 20, 2019

    Sullivan & Cromwell Accused Of Arbitration Double-Dealing

    An attorney has hit Sullivan & Cromwell LLP with a legal malpractice lawsuit in New York state court accusing the firm of unethically fighting the enforcement of an international arbitration award that one of its partners initially issued and costing him more than $13 million in fees.

  • December 20, 2019

    Gaming Co. Settles $151M Antitrust Suit Funding Dispute

    A company that allegedly withheld more than its fair cut of a $151 million antitrust deal has agreed to pay more than $1.2 million to end a Colorado man’s claims that he wasn’t fully repaid for helping fund the underlying suit.

  • December 20, 2019

    Baker Donelson Says It Doesn't Belong In Timber Scam Suit

    Any alleged wrongdoings committed by a Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC board member and a firm lobbyist involving a massive timber business Ponzi scam were unrelated to their work at the firm, Baker Donelson said Friday in a bid to shake off a receiver's Mississippi federal court complaint.

  • December 20, 2019

    Feds Rip Michael Cohen's Bid To Reduce Prison Term

    New York federal prosecutors pushed back Thursday against a bid by President Donald Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen to reduce his prison sentence in light of his cooperation with various authorities, saying there’s no evidence he provided substantial assistance to the Manhattan U.S. attorney’s office.

  • December 20, 2019

    Law Firm Shakes Off Malpractice Suit Over Union Deal

    A Louisiana federal court on Friday dismissed a lawsuit against a law firm and its now-retired managing partner, saying the former client’s malpractice claims over the drafting of a union contract were filed too late.

  • December 20, 2019

    Akin Gump Accused Of Exploiting 'Hobbled' Exec To Loot Co.

    A onetime Akin Gump lawyer drained the coffers of an internet business led by a drug-abusing chief executive, according to a malpractice and fraud suit filed against the firm Thursday in New York state court.

  • December 20, 2019

    Roger Stone Sentencing Pushed Back By 2 Weeks

    A D.C. federal judge handed longtime Trump confidant Roger Stone a partial win on Friday, postponing his Feb. 6 sentencing for two weeks, a day after attorneys for the self-described political "dirty trickster" asked for a monthlong delay to prepare financial information and other records for a pre-sentence report.

  • December 20, 2019

    Texas Justices Won't Toss Firm From Rodeo Owners' Battle

    The Supreme Court of Texas on Friday ruled that Fort Worth-based law firm Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP can stay in the fight over which group of owners will control the city's iconic honky-tonk and rodeo venue Billy Bob's Texas.

  • December 20, 2019

    Litigation Funder Burford Capital Sees Investor Suit Dropped

    Investors who accused litigation funder Burford Capital Ltd. and its top executives of juking its financial metrics have withdrawn a proposed class action against the firm.

  • December 20, 2019

    Fired Davis Polk Associate Wants To See Colleagues' Reviews

    Counsel for a black former Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP associate who claims the 800-lawyer firm discriminated against him and fired him out of racial bias told a Manhattan federal judge Friday that, to prove their case, they want to see performance reviews of their client's former colleagues.

  • December 20, 2019

    9th Circ. Told Attys Wrongly Sanctioned In Roundup Trial

    Two attorneys who represented a man who was awarded $25 million in a suit alleging the weedkiller Roundup caused his cancer have appealed a sanctions order issued against them during the trial, with one going so far as to call the sanctions “abusive and unfair.”

  • December 20, 2019

    The Biggest Stories In Florida Legal News Of 2019

    Between a giant health care fraud prosecution and a $10 billion suit against Bitcoin's self-professed inventor, there was no shortage of blockbuster cases in 2019 in the Sunshine State.

  • December 20, 2019

    Quilling Selander Suit Filed Too Late, Texas Justices Rule

    The Texas Supreme Court said Friday that a former Quilling Selander Lownds Winslett & Moser PC client waited too long to sue the firm over bad advice related to his work for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

  • December 20, 2019

    For Legal Pot, Grass May Be Greener On The Arbitration Side

    More cannabis companies are using arbitration to hash out their fights, and the country's arbitrators are welcoming them, promising privacy and greater control over cases federal courts might have trouble handling.

  • December 19, 2019

    Ch. 11 Trustee To Take Over Liddle & Robinson

    A Chapter 11 trustee will soon take the reins of embattled New York employment law firm Liddle & Robinson, after a bankruptcy judge said Thursday the move was necessary to ensure the case is wrapped up quickly.

  • December 19, 2019

    Morgan Stanley Blasts Outside Attys' Fee Bid In Wage Suit

    Morgan Stanley and a class of financial advisers who settled a compensation dispute with the Wall Street giant tore into attorneys from another similar lawsuit on Wednesday, blasting their “improper and unjustified” request to be awarded fees and costs from the $10 million deal.

  • December 19, 2019

    5th Circ. Won't Ax Judge From Transgender Bias Row

    The Fifth Circuit on Thursday refused to remove a Texas federal judge assigned to hear a transgender woman’s case against Dallas County officials over her treatment at the county jail and did not offer any comment behind the decision.

  • December 19, 2019

    Biggest Texas Cases Of 2019

    Texas courts in 2019 sent an appellate justice to prison, issued a seminal ruling on attorney fees and how to prove them, and gave clarity to mineral rights holders on their responsibilities. Here, Law360 looks at some of the most significant decisions of the year.

  • December 19, 2019

    NJ Pols Accused Of Taking Bribes From Tax Atty For Work

    Five current and former public officials and political candidates in New Jersey have been charged with accepting thousands of dollars in bribes from a tax attorney in order to steer government work to his law firm, with illicit cash payments allegedly stuffed in envelopes, paper bags and a coffee cup, prosecutors said Thursday.

  • December 19, 2019

    Rakoff Greenlights NY Challenge To ICE Courthouse Arrests

    U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff on Thursday allowed New York to move forward with its challenge to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s practice of arresting people at state courthouses, finding that courts can review these types of agency decisions.

  • December 19, 2019

    Scandals, Court Battles That Rocked New Jersey In 2019

    From sexual assault allegations within the administration of Gov. Phil Murphy to mixed jury verdicts for pharmaceutical giants, New Jersey in 2019 saw a number of scandals and court decisions that rocked Garden State politics and captivated the nation.

  • December 19, 2019

    NY Atty Gets 4.5 Years For $11.8M Estate Theft And Tax Plot

    A New York attorney and former local judge was sentenced to 4½ years in federal prison on Thursday for a scheme to steal $11.8 million from an elderly couple's estate, a term he'll serve concurrently with a three-to-10-year state sentence.

  • December 19, 2019

    CBD Co.'s Atty Sanctioned In SEC Illicit Stock Sale Suit

    A California federal judge has sanctioned a lawyer for a hemp company that's facing a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission lawsuit, saying the company had repeatedly made unfounded arguments through its lawyer that the court already dismissed as frivolous.

  • December 19, 2019

    Roche Wants Russian Drug Co. Sanctioned In Antitrust Fight

    Roche Holding AG and affiliates have urged a New York federal court to sanction a Russian drug company and its counsel, accusing them of filing an antitrust suit in which the foreign entity failed to articulate that its claims belonged in a U.S. courtroom.

  • December 19, 2019

    Solicitors' Regulator Rules Out Cuts To Indemnity Insurance

    The regulator for solicitors announced Thursday that it is dropping plans for sweeping cuts to "one-size-fits-all" professional negligence coverage, concluding that insurers would resist the plan.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Law Firm Business Tactics To Support A Niche Practice

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    Once you've chosen a strategy for your law firm, what tactics will promote success? There are three tactical areas important to all firms, regardless of specialty or size, but particularly critical for today’s niche firms, say Yussuf Aleem and Jacob Slowik of Joseph Aleem.

  • Tracking Developments In The Law Of Privilege

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    Three recent federal court cases offer insights on important attorney-client privilege issues: how the common interest doctrine protects disclosures to a third party, the right to compel work product based on “substantial need,” and the privilege questions raised by in-house counsel depositions, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • Real-Life Lessons For Lawyers From 'Game Of Thrones'

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    What lessons can the various hands, maesters, council members and other advisers in "Game of Thrones" impart to real-life lawyers? Quite a few, if we assume that the Model Rules of Professional Conduct were adopted by the Seven Kingdoms, says Edward Reich of Dentons.

  • 5 Tips To Help Your Summer Associates Succeed

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    There are a number of ways that attorneys can ensure their summer associates successfully manage critical writing assignments and new types of professional interactions, says Julie Schrager of Schiff Hardin.

  • Keys To Communicating A Law Firm's Mission

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    Today’s law firm leaders are pretty good at developing a strategic vision for the enterprise, but there is often a disconnect between that road map and the marketing department’s rank and file, leading to a deliverable that does little to differentiate the firm, says José Cunningham, a legal industry consultant.

  • Lawyers' Digital Assistants Raise Ethics, Privacy Concerns

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    As voice-activated digital assistants become more popular, attorneys who use such technology in their offices must keep abreast of evolving standards of reasonable care in protecting confidential client information, say Brenda Dorsett of the New York State Bar Association Professional Ethics Committee and Barry Temkin of Mound Cotton.

  • Opinion

    How Lawyers Can Help Save The Planet

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    Over a dozen major law firms have joined our effort to overcome the legal obstacles that states, cities and businesses face in fighting climate change. But more lawyers are needed, say Michael Gerrard of Columbia Law School and John Dernbach of Widener University Commonwealth Law School.

  • Amendments Would Add Clarity To Texas Anti-SLAPP Law

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    If signed into law by the Texas governor, recent amendments to the Texas Citizens Participation Act will offer solutions to resolve the impact the anti-SLAPP law has had on unfair competition lawsuits in the state. The changes include several notes of interest for Texas practitioners, says Matthew Simmons of Littler Mendelson.

  • Key Takeaways From Roundup Verdicts So Far

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    On May 13, a California jury returned a $2 billion verdict against Monsanto in the third trial over allegations that its popular weedkiller Roundup causes cancer. The Roundup trials highlight the importance of issues including punitive damages, celebrity influence and the value of jury exercises, say attorneys at Wiley Rein.

  • Q&A

    A Chat With Gilead Sciences Legal Ops Leader Gary Tully

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    In this monthly series, legal recruiting experts from Major Lindsey & Africa interview legal industry leaders about the increasingly competitive business environment. Here, Rod Osborne talks with Gary Tully, head of legal operations at Gilead Sciences.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Completing The Journey Home

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    My mother's connection to her Native American heritage had a major influence on my career — my decision to enter the legal profession was driven by the desire to return to my tribal community and help it in any way I could, says Jason Hauter of Akin Gump.

  • Examining The Evidence On VIX Manipulation

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    An ongoing multidistrict litigation alleges manipulation of the formula used to determine the settlement price for derivatives based on the Chicago Board Options Exchange’s volatility index. But a review of trading data reveals how reasons other than manipulation can explain trading activity on any given day, say consultants with Analysis Group.

  • The Problem With 9th Circ. CFPB Leadership Structure Ruling

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    In Consumer Financial Protection Bureau v. Seila Law, the Ninth Circuit recently ruled that the CFPB’s single-director structure is constitutional. However, the opinion applies the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Humphrey’s Executor v. U.S. in a way that ignores that decision's fundamental holding, says Alan Kaplinsky of Ballard Spahr.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Wood Reviews 'The Making Of A Justice'

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    Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens' new book, "The Making of a Justice," is required reading for anyone interested in 20th and 21st century America, says Seventh Circuit Chief Judge Diane Wood.

  • To Guard Against Waiving Privilege, Don't CC The Boss

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    Argos Holdings v. Wilmington Trust, a recent New York federal court opinion, cautions that attorneys and companies should not simply assume that privileged communications may be shared with a company’s owner or affiliates without waiving attorney-client privilege, even when the company’s and the owner’s interests are completely aligned, say attorneys at Katten Muchin.

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