Business of Law

  • July 24, 2024

    Dentons Brings On Former Big 4 Exec As New Global CEO

    Global law firm Dentons, which has made a name for itself by aggressive growth through combinations, has tapped a new global chief executive officer with leadership experience at accounting giant EY, the firm's first change at the top in over a decade.

  • July 23, 2024

    Knives Out For Another Pro-Agency Landmark After Chevron

    Only weeks after U.S. Supreme Court conservatives took a hatchet to the judicial deference shown to federal agencies, right-leaning lawyers are imploring the justices to rock the administrative law realm again by gutting a New Deal-era precedent at the heart of the modern regulatory system.

  • July 23, 2024

    JetBlue Upgrades Former Deputy To General Counsel Seat

    JetBlue Airways Corp. announced Tuesday that it has tapped a former member of its legal leadership team as the company's next general counsel and corporate secretary.

  • July 23, 2024

    Hogan Lovells Wants Afghanistan Atty Fee Award Enforced

    Hogan Lovells US LLP has asked a New York federal court to enforce a more than $1.2 million award it secured against Afghanistan in arbitration over fees it says it's owed for the firm's work representing the country in various legal matters, including litigation over the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

  • July 23, 2024

    Schiff's Bill Would Expand FOIA Provisions To Federal Courts

    Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., introduced legislation Tuesday that would extend the rights provided by the federal Freedom of Information Act to the work of the judicial branch.

  • July 23, 2024

    X's Tesla Ties Could Require Judge's Recusal, Watchdog Says

    Elon Musk's X Corp. wants to avoid disclosing its financial links with Tesla in the social media company's defamation lawsuit against Media Matters for America because the Texas federal judge overseeing the case likely holds Tesla stock and would need to recuse himself, the progressive media watchdog said.

  • July 23, 2024

    Prosecutor Turned Witness: 'Rust' Case Shows Rare Dilemma

    The botched "Rust" trial of Alec Baldwin and Donald Trump's election interference case in Georgia have offered scarce examples of prosecutors taking the stand, demonstrating how ethics scandals can snowball and make government attorneys choose between protecting themselves or their cases.

  • July 23, 2024

    US, UK, EU Antitrust Enforcers Outline AI Principles

    The top antitrust officials from the U.S. Justice Department, the Federal Trade Commission, the European Commission and the U.K.'s Competition and Markets Authority presented a unified international commitment Tuesday to closely monitor artificial intelligence technology and the companies that they warned could wield AI anticompetitively.

  • July 23, 2024

    FTC Attys On Kroger Case Get Extensions After IT Outage

    The administrative law judge overseeing the Federal Trade Commission's in-house challenge to Kroger and Albertsons' $25 billion merger has given the agency and the grocery behemoths two extra days on a couple of filing deadlines after the FTC said the worldwide Microsoft outage left several counsel laptops unusable.

  • July 23, 2024

    Labor Dept. ESG Rule May Survive Chevron's Demise

    The Fifth Circuit recently overturned a ruling that relied on the now-defunct doctrine of Chevron deference to uphold a U.S. Department of Labor rule covering socially conscious retirement plan investing, but some experts believe the rule has a good chance at surviving — even with the precedent off the books.

  • July 23, 2024

    SEC Names New Acting Head Of Exams

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has announced that the deputy director of its examinations division will serve as the unit's new acting director, as the previous director takes a leave of absence to focus on his health.

  • July 23, 2024

    Litigation Funder Says Apple Doc Request Is 'Mere Suspicion'

    Apple Inc. is trying to make an "end run" around a California trial court by demanding that Omni Bridgeway LLC turn over documents explaining its financial interest in patent litigation against Apple based on "mere suspicion," the litigation funder has told a Delaware federal judge.

  • July 23, 2024

    After Trump Attack, GOP Presses DOJ On Justices' Security

    Two Republican U.S. House representatives pressed the U.S. Department of Justice on Tuesday for information on security measures protecting court officers, warning that limitations on the U.S. Marshals Service's authority to arrest protesters near justices' homes are "dangerous and misguided," especially after former President Donald Trump's attempted assassination.

  • July 23, 2024

    No Victims, No Fraud, Trump Says In $465M Judgment Appeal

    Donald Trump has appealed the $465 million judgment against him, arguing that the New York attorney general exceeded her authority in her civil fraud suit against the former president because the statute in question does not apply to victimless transactions.

  • July 23, 2024

    Senate Dems Roll Out Bill To Codify Chevron Deference

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., led a group of Democratic senators Tuesday in introducing a bill to codify the now-defunct doctrine of Chevron deference after it was struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court last month.

  • July 23, 2024

    Brennan Center Gets $30M For High Court Reform Unit

    The Brennan Center for Justice at the New York University School of Law announced Tuesday that philanthropist and businessman Jim Kohlberg has committed $30 million for the establishment of a new unit focused on U.S. Supreme Court reform.

  • July 23, 2024

    Chamber Rips Multibillion-Dollar Atty Fee Bid In Musk Pay Suit

    The nation's largest business organization has urged Delaware's Court of Chancery to adopt sweeping curbs to jumbo plaintiff attorney fee awards, declaring a multibillion-dollar fee bid following the cancellation of Tesla CEO Elon Musk's stock-based pay plan "shocks the conscience."

  • July 23, 2024

    Convicted Sen. Menendez Of NJ Resigning Aug. 20

    U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez has decided to resign as the U.S. Senate Ethics Committee was moving swiftly to consider whether he should be expelled or censured after his conviction last week on 16 corruption charges.

  • July 23, 2024

    Texas Legal Services Biz Escapes Most Data Breach Claims

    A Texas federal judge has trimmed most claims in a proposed class action over a legal services company's data breach, leaving a negligence claim lodged by one plaintiff who alleges he was a victim of identity theft due to the breach.

  • July 23, 2024

    11th Circ. Should Uphold Tax Court Protection, IRS Says

    The Eleventh Circuit should uphold a U.S. Tax Court ruling that denied a widow tax relief and also rejected her claim that Tax Court judges have unconstitutional job protection, the Internal Revenue Service told the circuit court.

  • July 23, 2024

    Northern District Of NY Judge To Take Senior Status

    U.S. District Judge Glenn Suddaby of the Northern District of New York will take senior status as of Sept. 1.

  • July 23, 2024

    Polsinelli Lands In Philly With 20-Plus Holland & Knight Attys

    National law firm Polsinelli PC announced Tuesday it planned to expand its footprint into Philadelphia by opening a new office in the city with more than 20 shareholders who are moving their practices from Holland & Knight LLP.

  • July 23, 2024

    Secret Service Chief Out Amid Trump Rally Shooting Probes

    U.S. Secret Service Director Kimberly A. Cheatle resigned Tuesday, the day after lawmakers at a contentious congressional hearing demanded she step down following her agency's failure to stop the July 13 assassination attempt on former President Donald Trump in Pennsylvania.

  • July 22, 2024

    What Attorneys Need To Know About JD Vance

    Vice presidential nominee JD Vance's brief legislative record shows he is aligned with his fellow Republicans on hot-button issues like abortion and immigration, but it also indicates that the senator from Ohio may be willing to break with the GOP mainstream when it comes to regulating big business. Here's what attorneys should know about the vice presidential candidate.

  • July 22, 2024

    Secret Service Ripped By Lawmakers For Trump Rally 'Failure'

    U.S. Secret Service Director Kimberly Cheatle on Monday acknowledged a security failure during a July 13 campaign rally that ended in an assassination attempt on former President Donald Trump, as she was battered with resignation calls from a bipartisan group of lawmakers frustrated by her evasiveness during the investigation.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    After Chevron: Uncertainty In Scope Of ITC Oversight

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    The U.S. International Trade Commission's long-standing jurisprudence on some of the most disputed and controversial issues is likely to be reshaped by the Federal Circuit, which is no longer bound by Chevron deference in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Loper Bright decision, say Kecia Reynolds and Madeleine Moss at Paul Hastings.

  • Lead Like 'Ted Lasso' By Embracing Cognitive Diversity

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    The Apple TV+ series “Ted Lasso” aptly illustrates how embracing cognitive diversity can be a winning strategy for teams, providing a useful lesson for law firms, which can benefit significantly from fresh, diverse perspectives and collaborative problem-solving, says Paul Manuele at PR Manuele Consulting.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Bid Protest Litigation Will Hold Steady For Now

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    Though the substantive holding of Loper Bright is unlikely to affect bid protests because questions of statutory interpretation are rare, the spirit of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision may signal a general trend away from agency deference even on the complex technical issues that often arise, say Kayleigh Scalzo and Andrew Guy at Covington.

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Piercing FEMA Authority Is Not Insurmountable

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    While the Federal Emergency Management Agency's discretionary authority continues to provide significant protection from claims under the Administrative Procedure Act, Loper Bright is a blow to the argument that Congress gave FEMA unfettered discretion to administer its own programs, says Wendy Huff Ellard at Baker Donelson.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • Big Business May Come To Rue The Post-Administrative State

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    Many have framed the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decisions overturning Chevron deference and extending the window to challenge regulations as big wins for big business, but sand in the gears of agency rulemaking may be a double-edged sword, creating prolonged uncertainty that impedes businesses’ ability to plan for the future, says Todd Baker at Columbia University.

  • Series

    After Chevron: A Sea Change For Maritime Sector

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    The shipping industry has often looked to the courts for key agency decisions affecting maritime interests, but after the U.S. Supreme Court's Loper Bright ruling, stakeholders may revisit important industry questions and coordinate to bring appropriate challenges and shape rulemaking, say attorneys at Holland & Knight.

  • Opinion

    Post-Chevron, Good Riddance To The Sentencing Guidelines

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s overturning of the Chevron doctrine may signal the end of the U.S. sentencing guidelines, which is good news given that they have accomplished the opposite of Congress’ original intent to bring certainty, proportionality and uniformity to sentencing, say attorneys Mark Allenbaugh, Doug Passon and Alan Ellis.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Impact On CFPB May Be Limited

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo is likely to have a limited impact on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's regulatory activities, and for those who value due process, consistency and predictability in consumer financial services regulation, this may be a good thing, says John Coleman at Orrick.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

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    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • Series

    After Chevron: 7 FERC Takeaways From Loper Bright

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    Following the U.S. Supreme Court's overturning of the Chevron doctrine, it's likely that the majority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's orders will not be affected, but the commission has nonetheless lost an important fallback argument and will have to approach rulemaking more cautiously, says Norman Bay at Willkie Farr.

  • Series

    After Chevron: USDA Rules May Be Up In The Air

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    The Supreme Court's end of Chevron deference may cause more lawsuits against U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations, like the one redefining "unfair trade practices" under the Packers and Stockyards Act, or a new policy classifying salmonella as an adulterant in certain poultry products, says Bob Hibbert at Wiley.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Creating New Hurdles For ESG Rulemaking

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's Loper Bright decision, limiting court deference to agencies' statutory interpretations, could have significant impacts on the future of ESG regulation, creating new hurdles for agency rulemaking around these emerging issues, and calling into question current administrative actions, says Leah Malone at Simpson Thacher.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

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