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Life Sciences

  • June 19, 2019

    J&J Exec Defends Group Okla. Witness Called 'Opioid Mafia'

    A Johnson & Johnson executive in Wednesday testimony defended the company's participation in an advocacy group that has been called the "opioid mafia" by a witness for Oklahoma in the trial seeking to hold the drugmaker liable for the opioid crisis, denying that it was a "covert" lobbying operation seeking to influence pain medication policy.

  • June 19, 2019

    McKesson Lands Seat On Insys Creditors Committee

    Drug distributor McKesson, which has also drawn accusations it helped fuel the nation's opioid crisis, was among those named Wednesday to the official committee of unsecured creditors in Insys Therapeutics Inc.'s Chapter 11, along with individuals who have filed opioid-related suits and health industry representatives.

  • June 19, 2019

    Keryx Fights Investor's Bid To Lead Kidney Drug Stock Suit

    A Keryx investor seeking to lead a shareholder class action over a 2016 stock drop shouldn’t head up the suit because his shares were bought through a now-defunct trust and the vital information allegedly hid by the company was actually disclosed, a Massachusetts federal judge heard Wednesday.

  • June 19, 2019

    AbbVie, Investors Reach $17M Deal Over Failed Inversion

    Drugmaker AbbVie Inc. has reached a $16.75 million agreement to settle a claim that it misled investors about the risks of its failed $54 billion merger with Irish pharmaceutical company Shire PLC, according to documents filed Wednesday in Illinois federal court.

  • June 19, 2019

    Fed. Circ. 'Garbled' Halo Ruling, Zimmer Tells High Court

    The Federal Circuit has "profoundly misinterpreted" and overreacted to a U.S. Supreme Court decision that made it easier to win enhanced damages in patent cases, Zimmer Inc. said this week, urging the justices to review its $254 million loss in a case over surgical tools.

  • June 19, 2019

    3rd Circ. Won't Revive Ex-Medco Exec's FCA Kickback Suit

    The Third Circuit has refused to revive a former Medco Health Solutions Inc. executive's False Claims Act kickback suit over allegedly secret drug discounts, agreeing with a lower court that he didn't show he was the original source of the information he based his claims on.

  • June 19, 2019

    J&J Can't Blame Colgate, Avon In Talc Punitive Damages Trial

    A jury deciding whether Johnson & Johnson owes punitive damages for selling talcum products that contributed to a dying woman's cancer will not be told that a previous jury found Colgate and Avon partially responsible, a California judge decided Wednesday, saying their culpability isn't relevant to whether J&J acted with malice.

  • June 19, 2019

    San Francisco Poised To Become 1st US City To Ban E-Cigs

    San Francisco is on the verge of becoming the first U.S. city to ban e-cigarette sales after introducing an ordinance that aims to crack down on youth vaping by prohibiting the sale of flavored tobacco products and e-cigs.

  • June 19, 2019

    Clovis Directors Plead Ignorance On Rules In Drug Trial Suit

    Attorneys for the directors of biomedical company Clovis Oncology Inc. told a Delaware Chancery Court judge Wednesday that company management didn't inform the board that cancer drug trial results were being reported to federal regulators with non-conforming information.

  • June 19, 2019

    Fenwick-Led Stoke Therapeutics Prices Upsized $142M IPO

    Venture-backed Stoke Therapeutics Inc., a biotechnology firm developing therapies for genetic diseases, went public Wednesday after raising $142 million in an upsized initial public offering, steered by Fenwick & West LLP and underwriters' counsel Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP.

  • June 19, 2019

    PTAB Says ITC Case Doesn't Bar Dental Patent Challenge

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board on Tuesday agreed to review an Align Technology Inc. patent covering a teeth imaging device after it was challenged by a Danish rival, rejecting Align’s argument that the rival got an unfair leg up because the companies have already faced off in a related case at the U.S. International Trade Commission.

  • June 19, 2019

    Amphastar To Get $60M In Settlement With Rivals

    Amphastar Pharmaceuticals Inc. announced Wednesday it will receive nearly $60 million from two rival drug companies as part of a settlement to resolve an antitrust and patent suit.

  • June 18, 2019

    TridentUSA Ch. 11 Plan Slammed For Risking 'Repeat Failure'

    Health care provider TridentUSA's Chapter 11 plan is facing challenges from the U.S. Trustee Office and the company's unsecured creditors, who said the plan's liability releases are too broad and that it would leave the company primed for a return to bankruptcy.

  • June 18, 2019

    Fla. Jury Awards $70M Verdict To Couple In Asbestos Suit

    A former laboratory technician at a biopharmaceutical company and his wife were awarded roughly $70 million by a Florida state jury Monday over claims he contracted mesothelioma from his exposure at work to asbestos-containing products sold by an equipment business.

  • June 18, 2019

    Okla. Opioid Deaths Have Familiar Face, J&J Trial Judge Hears

    Oklahoma's chief medical examiner testified Tuesday in the landmark opioid trial against Johnson & Johnson that fentanyl has proven such an effective and familiar killer in the state that he now calls the posture that many victims die in "the fentanyl nod."

  • June 18, 2019

    Doc's Dropped Defect Defense Sank Med Mal Case, Panel Told

    What the family of a woman who underwent a fatally botched brain aneurysm repair thought was a "can't lose" medical malpractice case was unfairly hobbled when the doctor accused of negligence suddenly dropped his defense blaming a defective medical device, a Superior Court of Pennsylvania panel heard Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2019

    Dems Question HHS Patent Enforcement, Citing Truvada Woes

    A pair of Democratic lawmakers on Tuesday asked the Government Accountability Office to investigate how the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services manages its patents after reports that Gilead Sciences Inc.’s blockbuster HIV medication Truvada could be infringing HHS' intellectual property.

  • June 18, 2019

    Swift Ruling Vowed On Rule Requiring Drug Prices In TV Ads

    A D.C. federal judge is expected to decide in less than three weeks — a blazingly quick turnaround — on whether to block a new U.S. Department of Health and Human Services rule requiring drug prices in TV ads as the regulation’s effective date looms.

  • June 18, 2019

    Monsanto Looks To Whack $2B Roundup Verdict

    Monsanto urged a California judge to toss a jury’s verdict that Roundup likely caused a couple’s cancer and its staggering $2.055 billion damages award and enter judgment for the company or order a new trial, arguing the verdict was not based on evidence but on “deep passion and prejudice.”

  • June 18, 2019

    Judge Urged To Ax Lead Pa. Opioid Marketing Deception Case

    Accusations that drug manufacturers goosed opioid prescriptions by downplaying addiction risks run counter to common knowledge about the potency of the drugs, a Pennsylvania judge heard during arguments Tuesday over whether to ax the first in a glut of consolidated cases over costs local governments have borne over the drugs.

  • June 18, 2019

    Debt Collection Co. Files Ch. 11 After Health Data Breach

    The parent company of a billing collections firm that has been blamed for a breach that exposed personal data from 11.9 million Quest Diagnostics Inc. patients has filed for Chapter 11 protection in New York bankruptcy court, citing the consequences of the breach.

  • June 18, 2019

    Was A $5M Fine Just The Cost Of Closing A $6B Deal?

    When the Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice announced that Canon and Toshiba would pay $2.5 million each to settle allegations they deliberately skirted obligations to report Canon's $6 billion purchase of Toshiba Medical Systems, the agencies pronounced it a stern warning to others who might be tempted to close mergers without providing the obligatory disclosure.

  • June 18, 2019

    Sequenom Scores Patent Win Against Ariosa In The UK

    A U.K. judge ruled Monday that Ariosa Diagnostics infringes a patent owned by Sequenom Inc., the latest ruling in a series of patent disputes between the companies over prenatal genetic tests that has included U.S. decisions invalidating Sequenom's patents as ineligible.

  • June 18, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: Dish, Chi-Med, NiSource

    Dish Network is said to be close to dropping $6 billion to buy assets from Sprint and T-Mobile, Hutchison China MediTech has reportedly postponed the launch of a planned Hong Kong listing, and NiSource is said to be considering selling a subsidiary tied to last year’s deadly pipeline explosions in Massachusetts.

  • June 18, 2019

    Asacol Buyers Say Product-Hopping Suit Requires Trial

    Buyers of Allergan's ulcerative colitis drugs have told a Massachusetts federal court that they were coerced into paying for higher-priced medication when the company blocked a generic drug from the market, which they say is enough to push their antitrust case to trial.

Expert Analysis

  • A Guide To FCA Cooperation Credit For Life Sciences Cos.

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    Though the U.S. Department of Justice's guidelines on cooperation credit in False Claims Act matters fail to answer some key questions, they do describe how life sciences companies can cooperate without admitting liability — though companies may need to share information with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as well, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • How Purdue Opioid Win Could Bolster J&J In Okla. Trial

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    North Dakota's consumer fraud and public nuisance claims against opioid manufacturer Purdue Pharma were recently dismissed by a state court. The decision provides a framework for opioid defendants to challenge similar allegations in other jurisdictions, and may prove timely for Johnson & Johnson in its current Oklahoma trial, says Cameron Turner of Segal McCambridge.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Can Improve Their Job Interviews

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    When evaluating potential new hires, law firms should utilize structured interviews in order to create a consistent rating system that accurately and effectively assesses candidates' skills and competencies, says Jennifer Henderson of Major Lindsey.

  • State Net

    State Efforts To Rein In Drug Costs Have Mixed Success

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    Reducing the soaring costs of commonly used prescription drugs has become a political priority in the nation’s statehouses. But thus far, states have done better at increasing transparency around drug pricing than at actually lowering prices, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • A Rare Antitrust Deferred Prosecution Agreement From DOJ

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    The significant question raised by Heritage Pharmaceuticals' deferred prosecution agreement — the U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division's first DPA with a company other than a bank — is whether it signals a broader openness to such agreements by the division, say Peter Huston and Alex Bourelly at Baker Botts.

  • Recreational Marijuana Legislation Is At A Standstill In NY

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    Efforts to legalize recreational marijuana in New York have stalled due to lawmakers' disagreements over key issues, but despite this setback, eventual legalization seems to be inevitable, says Alissa Yohey of Spiritus Law.

  • How To Streamline Virtual Law Team Mass Tort Defense

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    A primary benefit of the virtual law team in mass tort litigation is creative collaboration. A "company case" approach is essential to breaking down the silos between team members, say attorneys at FaegreBD and Reed Smith.

  • Saving Seaweed Via Maine Property Law

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    The recent Maine Supreme Court decision Ross v. Acadian Seaplants serves as an example of looking to property law and land stewardship to counteract the "tragedy of the commons" that can arise when environmental resources — in this case, a type of seaweed — are publicly owned but not adequately regulated, says Gordon Smith of Verrill Dana.

  • The SEC Is Cracking Down On Insider Trading By Lawyers

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    A recent series of actions brought by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission suggests that insider trading by lawyers may be on the rise. Legal departments and law firms should understand the four types of cases the SEC is pursuing in this area, says Daniel Hawke of Arnold & Porter.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.

  • Insuring The Ever-Growing Cannabis Industry: Part 2

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    By legalizing hemp, the Farm Bill has legitimized a portion of the cannabis space, but it has also created fertile ground for new liability exposures, which create significant opportunities for insurers to enter the cannabis market, say Jodi Green and Patricia Daza-Luu of Nicolaides Fink.

  • Law Firms Can Do Better With Their Mentoring Programs

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    There are a few practical, proactive steps law firms can take to create a mentoring program that pays dividends — instead of creating a mediocre program that both parties see as an obligation, says Kate Sheikh of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Confidentiality: The New Employee Arbitration Battleground

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    The National Labor Relations Board's decision that arbitration agreements may not lawfully require employees to keep arbitrations confidential is not precedential and is expected to receive further review from the NLRB. But it is still useful for understanding the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court's Epic Systems decision, say Jared Gardner and Danielle Ryman of Perkins Coie.

  • IP's Developing Role In Cannabis Business Strategy

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    Several recent cannabis-related legal developments suggest that properly secured, federally protected intellectual property is both available and enforceable for the industry, say attorneys at Sterne Kessler.

  • The Latest Developments In Criminal Cases Against Execs

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    This spring, there was some noteworthy news in white collar government investigations impacting executives, including the first successful prosecution in the opioid bribery scheme and the first criminal charges for failure to report under the Consumer Product Safety Act, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.