New York

  • October 11, 2019

    Bear Stearns, Reed Smith Settle $500M Malpractice Suit

    Two now-defunct Bear Stearns investment funds have agreed to end a malpractice suit in New York court accusing Reed Smith LLP of bungling its representation of the funds to the tune of half a billion dollars during a suit against ratings agencies.

  • October 11, 2019

    Fox News, Anchor Harris Faulkner Hit With Discrimination Suit

    A former Fox News makeup artist on Thursday sued the network, anchor Harris Faulkner and several other network employees, alleging he was harassed because he's young, gay and Hispanic and was eventually fired after reporting the harassment.

  • October 11, 2019

    Trump Attys Tell 2nd Circ. Presidents Immune From Criminal Probes

    Lawyers for President Donald Trump argued Friday that as a sitting president, he has “absolute immunity” from criminal investigations and therefore the Second Circuit should block the Manhattan district attorney from subpoenaing Trump’s tax returns.

  • October 11, 2019

    NXIVM Sex Cult Atty's Bid For Prosecutor Gig Comes To End

    An attorney who represents the convicted founder of the NXIVM sex cult no longer has her application pending for a job in the U.S. attorney's office for the Eastern District of New York, following concerns the job pursuit could be a conflict of interest in the high-profile racketeering and sex trafficking case against Keith Raniere.

  • October 11, 2019

    SEC Blocks $1.7B Digital Token Offering In Court

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission obtained a temporary restraining order in New York federal court Friday to block two offshore entities from carrying out a $1.7 billion digital token offering that the agency says violates securities laws.

  • October 11, 2019

    Feds Call Ex-Deutsche Traders 'Emblematic' Of Banking Ills

    Federal prosecutors say two former Deutsche Bank traders’ deserve substantial prison time for Libor rigging as a crime “emblematic” of big banks’ bad behavior, while the traders argue that they had already suffered enough as two of the few to be prosecuted over the international scandal.

  • October 11, 2019

    Purdue Opioid Suits Get One-Month Pause, For Now

    A New York bankruptcy judge Friday put the opioid lawsuits against Purdue Pharma LP on a monthlong hold after the drugmaker and the government bodies suing it agreed to the pause while they try and work out terms for a longer stay.

  • October 11, 2019

    SF Businessman Tied To Giuliani Associates Gets $1M Bond

    A California federal judge set a $1 million bond on Friday for a San Francisco businessman facing charges that he and associates of the president's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani violated campaign finance laws in seeking influence for Ukrainian officials, ordering the man to home detention once he posts the money.

  • October 11, 2019

    Lyft Sues NYC Regulators To Annul Limits On 'Cruise' Time

    Lyft Inc. sued the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission in state court Friday over its new rule that caps the amount of time drivers can "cruise" Manhattan without passengers, arguing that the rule is arbitrary and capricious, against the interest of underserved communities and in violation of antitrust laws.

  • October 11, 2019

    3rd Circ. Upholds Nike, Port Authority Wins In Title VII Rulings

    In two opinions Friday, Third Circuit panels upheld lower court rulings granting early judgment in favor of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and Nike Inc. in Title VII suits brought by two former employees that alleged discrimination and retaliation.

  • October 11, 2019

    Rakoff Hammers Salon Owner With $500K Insider Trading Fine

    U.S. District Judge Jed S. Rakoff allowed Manhattan hairdresser Abell Oujaddou to avoid prison for insider trading Friday, citing his remorse and cooperation with prosecutors, but smacked the wealthy business owner with a $500,000 fine for a crime of "sheer greed."

  • October 11, 2019

    After Mississippi Exit, AGs' T-Mobile Suit May Dwindle

    The coalition of 18 state attorneys general suing to block the Sprint-T-Mobile merger showed signs of splintering when Mississippi departed the lawsuit, raising the possibility that other rural states will also strike deals securing additional mobile coverage commitments and cementing their support for the merger.

  • October 11, 2019

    Boustani Heads To Trial In $2B Mozambique Fraud Case

    The long-awaited trial of Privinvest executive Jean Boustani over his role in a securities fraud, bribery and kickback scheme involving $2 billion in Mozambican government loans is scheduled to commence on Tuesday.

  • October 11, 2019

    CVR Loses Bid To Reignite Malpractice Fight With Wachtell

    A New York federal judge axed CVR Energy Inc.’s malpractice suit against Wachtell Lipton Rosen & Katz on Wednesday and said the oil company’s request to retool its complaint “blatantly disregards” an earlier order that limited the scope of revisions CVR was already allowed to make.

  • October 11, 2019

    Court Skeptical Of Columbia's Bid To End ERISA Suit

    A New York federal magistrate judge appeared unpersuaded by Columbia University’s attempts to bring an early end to a class action challenging its retirement plan’s fees and investments, saying during a hearing Friday that he sees factual disputes in the case that can’t be resolved without a trial.

  • October 11, 2019

    'Horsefeathers!' Pierce Bainbridge Investigator Slams Ex-Atty

    The law firm hired to investigate alleged misconduct by an ex-Pierce Bainbridge partner told a New York trial judge on Friday that it should be excused from the former partner’s wrongful termination lawsuit, sparring with the ejected attorney and drawing a rebuke from the judge.

  • October 11, 2019

    Barneys Gets Extension To Name Ch. 11 Stalking Horse

    Bankrupt luxury retailer Barneys New York Inc. will have until Tuesday morning to submit a stalking horse asset purchase agreement with a purchase price that will cover outstanding post-petition loan obligations after a hearing Friday on proposed amendments to those loan documents.

  • October 11, 2019

    As 'Copyright Troll' Turns National, Will Blowback Follow?

    Richard Liebowitz, an attorney who has filed more than 1,600 copyright lawsuits over the past four years, is quietly spreading his mass litigation operation from New York to the rest of the country — and judges in those other courts are starting to notice.

  • October 11, 2019

    Restasis Payors Defend Class Cert. Bid In Allergan Suit

    A group of Restasis buyers on Friday defended class certification in their New York federal suit accusing Allergan of boosting profits by delaying a cheaper generic version of the dry-eye medication, saying they share numerous, common antitrust injuries.

  • October 11, 2019

    NY Judge Charged With Obstructing Credit Union Probe

    A Brooklyn state court judge was arrested Friday on charges of obstructing Manhattan federal prosecutors' probe into corruption at Municipal Credit Union, while an ex-cop was charged with embezzling from the credit union and peddling pills to its convicted CEO.

  • October 11, 2019

    Current Accuses Facebook Of Copying Crypto Wallet Logo

    Mobile banking company Current has accused Facebook of ripping off its logo by promoting a virtually identical one for its forthcoming cryptocurrency wallet, Libra.

  • October 11, 2019

    Union Can't Avoid Charter Strike Arbitration, 2nd Circ. Says

    The Second Circuit ruled Friday that the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers can’t avoid arbitration with Charter Communications over a March 2017 strike, rejecting the union's argument that a National Labor Relations Board ruling meant it wasn't bound by a no-strike agreement.

  • October 11, 2019

    2nd Circ. Orders Damages Redo In Health Plan Funding Row

    The Second Circuit has found that a federal district judge incorrectly applied an interest rate when looking at how much a food services business owed a union health plan in damages for unpaid health care contributions, kicking the case back to the lower court to rethink how much the company needs to pay.

  • October 11, 2019

    Terrorism Aid Claims Are Too Late, Standard Chartered Says

    Standard Chartered Bank on Thursday urged a New York federal judge not to revive a lawsuit alleging the bank knowingly helped terrorists, arguing that the military families and veterans who made the claims did so too late and hadn't shown the bank did anything wrong.

  • October 11, 2019

    Fyre Fest Ticket Holders Want Ja Rule Back In $100M Suit

    Just when rapper Ja Rule thought he was out, jilted Fyre Festival ticket holders suing for $100 million are trying to pull him back in, claiming new information shows he was promoting the doomed festival even as he knew it was destined for spectacular failure.

Expert Analysis

  • How Emotionally Intelligent AI Could Assist With E-Discovery

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    While artificial intelligence has already revolutionized the e-discovery field, the development of emotionally intelligent AI promises to explore data in an even more nuanced and human way, thereby further reducing the burden on legal teams, say Lisa Prowse and Brian Schrader at e-discovery services provider BIA.

  • State Net

    States May Slow Spread Of Vehicle Subscription Services

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    Motor vehicle subscription services — similar to auto leases, except with no long-term commitment, the ability to change vehicles periodically, and insurance and maintenance bundled in — have been embraced by some automakers, insurers and consumers, but face potential roadblocks from state lawmakers and regulators, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling May Cause Int'l Discovery Flurry In NY

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    The Second Circuit's recent Section 1782 decision in Application of Antonio Del Valle Ruiz could be particularly burdensome for New York–based offices of multinational companies, which may now be compelled to produce documents located abroad despite not being involved in any domestic litigation, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Preventable Risks Your Law Firm May Be Overlooking

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    Although most lawyers are well-prepared to defend or justify the value of an insurance claim for clients, often law firms have not clearly identified their own potential liabilities, planned for adequate insurance or established prudent internal risk management practices, says Victor Sordillo at Sompo International.

  • 6 Ethics Tips For Attorneys Making Lateral Transfers

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    With lateral transfers between law firms on the rise, it is more important than ever for partners to understand the steps they must take to adhere to ethics rules and other requirements when making a transition, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Reorganization Of NY Courts Would Ease Inefficiency Issues

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    If adopted, New York Chief Judge Janet DiFiore's proposal to streamline the state's unified court system will likely help balance disproportionate caseloads and improve the process of how judges are appointed to the Appellate Division, say Peter Shakro and Muhammad Faridi at Patterson Belknap.

  • Opinion

    President’s Private Business Interests Are Not Above The Law

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    President Donald Trump's New York federal court case against the Manhattan district attorney's subpoena of the president's tax returns insists that his private businesses and business associates are immune from state criminal investigation, but this immunity does not appear in the Constitution or any statute or treaty, say Arthur Middlemiss and Marc Scholl at Lewis Baach.

  • NY Pay Frequency Ruling May Expand Employer Liability

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    In Vega v. CM & Associates Construction Management, a New York appellate court recently recognized for manual workers a private cause of action and the ability to recover liquidated damages when they have been paid late, a decision that could lead to an uptick in pay frequency claims, say Leni Battaglia and Melissa Rodriguez at Morgan Lewis.

  • Direct Taxes: The Next Shoe To Drop After Wayfair?

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    Taxpayers should be alarmed at state efforts to extend the U.S. Supreme Court's Wayfair decision to direct taxes — including gross receipts, income and franchise taxes — despite the apparent protections of federal Public Law 86-272, says Martin Eisenstein of Brann & Isaacson.

  • State Net

    Battles Still Rage Over Calif. Data, Worker Classification Laws

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    California is set to be reshaped soon by two pieces of legislation — one on data privacy, and one on worker classification — but numerous attempts by lawmakers to amend both laws, and the possibility of ballot measures that may further alter them, are clouding the picture, says Rich Ehisen of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Consider The Power Of Tactical Empathy

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    By employing tactical empathy techniques to understand the interests behind the positions taken by others, attorneys can gain the upper hand in deal negotiations and litigation while still promoting and preserving long-term relationships with opponents, judges and others, say Shermin Kruse of TEDxYouth@Wrigleyville and Ursula Taylor of Strategic Health.

  • The Problem — And Opportunity — Of Implicit Bias In The Bar

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    Law firms are beginning to recognize implicit bias as a problem. But too few recognize that it is also an opportunity to broaden our thinking and become better legal problem solvers, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • #MeToo Shows 2 Years Of Progress Toward Gender Parity

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    #MeToo turns 2 this fall, and while troubling reports of bad workplace behavior have emerged since the movement began, legislation and grassroots community collaborations that focus on preventive measures, such as training and external certifications, are fruitful areas for future development, says Jen Rubin at Mintz.

  • The Latest Carbon Market Developments: Part 2

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    The Democratic primary debates and a proliferation of bills in Congress make it clear that carbon pricing will be a significant issue in the 2020 U.S. elections — and a host of international pilot programs for carbon emissions credit trading suggest even more interest in the subject abroad, say attorneys with Beveridge & Diamond.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Thapar Reviews Gorsuch's 'A Republic'

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    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's new book "A Republic, If You Can Keep It" offers hope for our constitutional system through stories of American greatness, and sheds much-needed light on originalism for skeptics, says Sixth Circuit Judge Amul Thapar.