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New York

  • April 23, 2019

    LVMH Legal Affairs VP Alleges Sex Harassment At Luxury Co.

    The vice president of legal affairs and litigation counsel at LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton Inc. says she’s been sexually harassed for years on the job, and when she reported it, the company chastised her, intimidated her and suggested promoting the man who harassed her.

  • April 23, 2019

    Adviser Admits Paying NCAA Football Players In Hoops Trial

    A former financial adviser turned agent for federal investigators testified Tuesday in the New York federal trial of two men charged with funneling bribes to college basketball coaches that he had paid thousands of dollars to college football players, a bombshell admission that hints at wider corruption in college sports. 

  • April 23, 2019

    What Drove DOJ's 1st Opioid Distributor Charges?

    The U.S. Department of Justice’s first felony charges accusing a drug distributor of fueling the opioid crisis involve familiar allegations of reckless painkiller sales that until now have been punished with civil penalties. But the accusations are also backed up by direct accounts of C-suite complicity, one of several factors that likely tipped the case into criminal waters.

  • April 23, 2019

    'Deception And Greed' Drove Platinum Fraud, Jury Hears

    A New York federal jury on Tuesday heard opening arguments in the long-awaited fraud trial of former Platinum Partners executives accused of conning the now defunct $1 billion hedge fund's investors, with a prosecutor saying the case boils down to "deception and greed."

  • April 23, 2019

    2 Men With China Ties Indicted In GE Trade Secret Theft

    A New York federal court unsealed an indictment Tuesday naming two individuals — an ex-engineer and a businessman — in an alleged plot to steal GE's steam turbine trade secrets for the Chinese government, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • April 23, 2019

    $5.1M For NYC Bus Crash A Tad Too High, Appeals Court Says

    A New York state appeals court on Tuesday upheld $4.7 million of a jury's $5.1 million award after a crash between a city bus and a motorcycle, but said the damages given for the injured rider's future medical expenses were over the top.

  • April 23, 2019

    Domino's Served ADA Suit Over Long Island Location

    A consumer slapped Domino’s Pizza LLC with a New York federal suit Tuesday alleging that a Long Island location isn’t accessible to disabled individuals, violating the Americans with Disabilities Act.

  • April 23, 2019

    Platinum Affiliates Say ‘Wagoner’ Kills Liquidators' Claims

    More than a dozen sets of defendants in a suit over the collapse of Platinum Partners say a Second Circuit rule prevents the hedge fund’s liquidators from suing them for Platinum’s own misconduct.

  • April 23, 2019

    2nd Circ. Presses Pause On Madoff Foreign Clawback Ruling

    Until the U.S. Supreme Court responds to an impending review bid, the Second Circuit will not issue a mandate on its ruling that the trustee for Bernie Madoff’s fraudulent investment firm can claw back billions in Ponzi scheme proceeds from foreign parties.

  • April 23, 2019

    Synergy Pharmaceuticals Wins Ch. 11 Plan Approval

    Synergy Pharmaceuticals Inc. received court approval Tuesday to wind down in Chapter 11 under a bankruptcy plan that provides creditors with recoveries from a $195 million sale of the company's drug treatments to Bausch Health Cos. Inc., overcoming challenges from the federal government's bankruptcy case watchdog.

  • April 23, 2019

    Abraaj Partner To Be Tried Separately From PE Firm's CEO

    A Manhattan federal judge targeted November for Abraaj Group managing partner Mustafa Abdel-Wadood to stand trial on fraud charges, after hearing Tuesday it could take two years for his ex-boss, CEO Arif Naqvi, to be extradited from England.

  • April 23, 2019

    Ex-Waiter Gets Partial Class Cert. Over Stiffed Steakhouse Pay

    A New York federal court has conditionally certified a class of tipped workers at one location of a ritzy steakhouse chain's Manhattan restaurants in litigation claiming the business stiffed them on minimum wages, overtime and tips, but denied certification to workers at four others.

  • April 23, 2019

    CityTime Fraudster Can’t Dodge Prison By Blaming Attys

    A New York federal judge on Monday refused to free a man serving 20 years for his role in the $100 million CityTime kickbacks scandal, rejecting claims that his conviction should be thrown out because his attorneys did a poor job defending him.

  • April 23, 2019

    DC Circ. Says EPA Was Right Not To Expand Ozone Region

    The D.C. Circuit on Tuesday rejected a group of East Coast states' effort to force the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to impose stricter ozone controls on upwind states to limit the spread of air pollution.

  • April 23, 2019

    Macquarie Says Investors’ Stock-Drop Suit Oversells Evidence

    Macquarie and its executives asked a New York federal judge Monday to nix a stock-drop lawsuit by investors alleging it misled them about the health of its liquid storage business, arguing the shareholders are attempting to manufacture a pattern of deception by the infrastructure company.

  • April 23, 2019

    Ex-Shkreli Atty Splitting Hairs Over 'Duty,' Gov't Says

    Prosecutors sought to preserve the conviction of Martin Shkreli's former attorney Evan Greebel on Monday, telling the Second Circuit that his claim that jury instructions used the wrong definition of a lawyer's "duty" was an attempt to draw a "fine-to-nonexistent line" that made no difference at his trial.

  • April 23, 2019

    Broker Asks To Bring Back Expert In SEC’s ‘Layering’ Suit

    Lek Securities Corp. urged a New York federal court Monday to rethink its decision to exclude certain expert testimony in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s suit accusing Lek of helping a foreign trader manipulate the market through a practice known as “layering.”

  • April 23, 2019

    DOJ Unveils 1st Criminal Charges Against Opioid Distributor

    The U.S. Department of Justice on Tuesday announced its first-ever criminal charges against a drug distributor for selling prescription opioids to pharmacies despite clear evidence the drugs were being diverted for illicit use.

  • April 22, 2019

    Fisher-Price, Mattel Sued Over Deadly Rock 'N Play Sleepers

    Mattel Inc. and its subsidiary Fisher-Price Inc. are facing at least two putative class actions from consumers claiming negligence after the Consumer Product Safety Commission warned earlier this month that 10 infants died while in Rock 'N Play Sleepers since 2015.

  • April 22, 2019

    M&G Mexican Units Seek Ch. 15 Protection From PBGC Filing

    Two former subsidiaries of the M&G Chemical Group involved in the manufacture of polymer products received interim relief Monday from a New York bankruptcy judge from efforts by the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. to enforce $37 million in payments stemming from M&G USA Corp.'s Chapter 11 case.

Expert Analysis

  • Rebuttal

    Jury Trials, Though In Decline, Are Well Worth Preserving

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    In a recent Law360 guest article, the author applauded the disappearance of jury trials as an inefficient, costly mechanism, but in doing so he overlooked the greater value of jury trials for our justice system, says Stephen Susman, executive director of the Civil Jury Project at NYU School of Law.

  • Measles Vaccine Mandates Have Strong Legal Footing

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    In response to the recent measles outbreak, more cities and states are expected to follow New York City's lead with orders for mandatory measles vaccinations, and challenges to those orders are unlikely to be successful, say Michael Hoernlein and Rebecca Gauthier of Alston & Bird.

  • A Broader View Of The US Supreme Court Bar

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    During the past 15 years, three widely read articles bolstered by starstruck media have promulgated the incorrect perception — sorely in need of revision — that the U.S. Supreme Court bar is limited to a handful of elite lawyers, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • State Net

    Court Battles Slow Trump Health Care Rollbacks

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    A D.C. federal court recently struck down Trump administration waivers allowing two states to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients. The case is part of a larger partisan struggle in which President Donald Trump and Republican state attorneys general continue their efforts to dismantle Obamacare, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • In Virtual Teams For Mass Torts, The 'Law Team' Is Critical

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    A critical component of any virtual law team assembled for mass tort litigation is a dedicated "law team," which tackles the legal strategy and drafts the many necessary pleadings, motions and other submissions, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton and Faegre.

  • Kickstarter's Unionizing Efforts May Signal New Trend In Tech

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    Historically, employee organizing efforts at tech companies have been limited to lower-paying positions, but Kickstarter employees' recently announced plans to unionize could signal a shift toward increased unionizing efforts by tech workers in higher-paid positions, says Candice Zee of Vedder Price.

  • 5 Tips For Lawyers Entering The Cannabis Industry

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    As the cannabis industry continues to grow, it will need more legal professionals to help navigate the turbulent business landscape, but lawyers should understand the industry's unique limitations and characteristics before diving in, says Sabas Carrillo of consulting firm Adnant.

  • Opinion

    Jury Trials Are In Decline For Good Reason

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    A recent Law360 article reported on federal judges bemoaning jury trials' nationwide decline, but these laments are unfounded as jury trials have been replaced by better alternatives, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research.

  • When Done Right, Class Coupon Settlements Can Still Work

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    Recent objections by the U.S. Department of Justice and state attorneys general to coupon and in-kind settlements in consumer class actions have provided at least a tacit road map for how to design a coupon settlement that may avoid drawing governmental opposition, says Jeffrey Jacobson of Kelley Drye.

  • Few Avenues To Protection For Foreign FCPA Whistleblowers

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in Wadler v. Bio-Rad falls within a larger pattern of federal courts interpreting whistleblower protection statutes narrowly — especially when employees raise allegations about international business and potential Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations abroad, say Daniel Wendt and Amelia Hairston-Porter of Miller & Chevalier.