Real Estate

  • July 03, 2020

    Trump's Niece Claims She Was Duped By President's Fraud

    President Donald Trump's niece, who is fighting to release her purportedly damning tell-all book about her family, said Thursday that the president and his siblings fraudulently induced her to enter a nondisclosure agreement based on their bogus estimates of her stake in the Trump empire.

  • July 03, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen a competition suit against Royal Mail, a Saint-Gobain unit lodge a patent claim against 3M and a Russian bank file another suit against Mozambique and one of the state-owned entities embroiled in a $2 billion bribery scandal. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • July 02, 2020

    NY Appeals Manafort Fraud Suit Axed As Double Jeopardy

    The Manhattan district attorney urged a New York appellate court Thursday to revive a state criminal mortgage fraud case against the president's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, arguing that the state charges are distinct from federal charges he's currently serving time for and aren't grounds for double jeopardy.

  • July 02, 2020

    FERC Seeks Hill's Help After DC Circ. Dumps Pipeline Policy

    Two Federal Energy Regulatory Commissioners on Thursday urged Congress to extend the agency's administrative appeals process and give landowners more protection, two days after the D.C. Circuit blew a hole in FERC's ability to delay requests to reconsider gas project approvals.

  • July 02, 2020

    Coronavirus Litigation: The Week In Review

    Grocery delivery service Instacart is suing to block a Seattle ordinance requiring coronavirus hazard pay for gig delivery workers, New York police officers and Las Vegas resort workers claim they haven't been provided with adequate protections during the pandemic, and the ACLU says California courts can't block public access to trials, despite the virus. 

  • July 02, 2020

    Developer Allegedly Conspired To Defraud La. Bank Of $123M

    A real estate developer has been charged in New Orleans federal court with conspiracy to defraud $123 million from the now-defunct First NBC Bank through a scheme allegedly orchestrated with the bank's president and other employees.

  • July 02, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: JP Morgan, Hollywood, Fla., Elion

    A J.P. Morgan venture has reportedly landed $120 million in financing for a Philadelphia mixed-use project, the city of Hollywood, Florida, is reportedly looking for a development partner for a beachfront project, and Elion Partners is said to have paid $7.2 million for a Florida warehouse.

  • July 02, 2020

    Angelo Gordon Raises $1.5B For European RE Fund

    New York-based investment firm Angelo Gordon & Co. LP said Thursday that its latest real estate fund raised $1.5 billion that will be used to target all types of property in the U.K., the Nordic countries and Western Europe.

  • July 02, 2020

    Eversheds Sutherland Picks Up Real Estate Trio In Chicago

    Eversheds Sutherland has picked up a trio of experienced attorneys focused on retail development from White & Case LLP and Meltzer Purtill & Stelleto LLC to add to its growing real estate practice in Chicago.

  • July 02, 2020

    Biotech Firms Drive IPO Rebound While 'Unicorns' Gear Up

    The initial public offering market ended midyear on a roll and appears poised for a strong second half of 2020, powered by a robust biotechnology sector and potential debuts from venture-backed technology "unicorns" — barring more pandemic-related setbacks.

  • July 02, 2020

    More Than A Dozen Firms Aided Largest Q2 Real Estate Deals

    White & Case and Hogan Lovells were among more than a dozen firms that helped with the 10 largest real estate mergers and acquisitions deals of the second quarter, five of which were north of the $1 billion mark.

  • July 01, 2020

    Simon & Schuster Beats Bid To Block Mary Trump Tell-All

    Simon & Schuster can move forward with publishing the purportedly damning tell-all book penned by President Donald Trump's niece, a New York appellate court ruled Wednesday, partially reversing a lower court's temporary restraining order issued one day earlier.

  • July 01, 2020

    CFPB Slates Debt Collection, Mortgage Data Rules For Fall

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Tuesday that it expects to finalize first-of-their-kind debt collection regulations and propose changes to mortgage data reporting requirements this fall, previewing plans that would buck calls for a rulemaking moratorium during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • July 01, 2020

    Calif. Atty Reported To Bar For Real Estate Fraud

    A California state appellate court reported an attorney to the state's bar association after determining he engaged in real estate fraud to avoid paying a judgment of over $900,000 for charging a former client excessive fees.

  • July 01, 2020

    DOJ Seeks Warhol, Monet Artwork In $96M 1MDB Clawback

    The U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday filed civil forfeiture complaints seeking about $96 million in assets allegedly related to money laundering by a Malaysian state-owned investment fund, including artwork by Claude Monet, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol.

  • July 01, 2020

    Miller Friel Picks Up Insurance Pro From DLA Piper

    Miller Friel PLLC is hiring away a partner from DLA Piper as part of a move to bolster its nationwide expansion of the firm's insurance recovery practice.

  • July 01, 2020

    24 Hour Fitness Rent Deferral OK'd Over Landlord Outcry

    A Delaware judge on Wednesday gave her nod for gym chain 24 Hour Fitness Worldwide Inc. to defer an estimated roughly $65 million in rent payments, despite strong objection from multiple landlords, as it moves forward with Chapter 11 plans to restructure its $1.4 billion in debt.

  • July 01, 2020

    Congress Extends PPP To August, Mulls 2nd Round Of Loans

    The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday to reopen the Paycheck Protection Program through Aug. 8, sending the Senate-approved measure to the president as lawmakers discuss a possible second round of forgivable loans.

  • July 01, 2020

    Major Real Estate Cos. Accused Of Age Bias In Facebook Ads

    A handful of major real estate companies were sued Wednesday in Maryland federal court over allegations they systematically discriminated against older residents in the Washington, D.C., area by targeting housing ads on Facebook to a young customer base.

  • July 01, 2020

    WeWork Sued For $54M Over Broken Calif. Office Lease

    WeWork's landlord at a Los Angeles office building said the coworking company owes at least $54 million in damages after it backed out of a 10-year lease agreement, according to a lawsuit lodged Tuesday in California state court.

  • July 01, 2020

    Cresco Inks $29M Sale-Leaseback Deal For Mass. Pot Facility

    Cannabis heavyweight Cresco Labs said Wednesday that it sold and leased back a cultivation, processing and dispensing facility in Massachusetts for $29 million, a deal that includes $21 million earmarked for improvements at the 118,000-square-foot site.

  • July 01, 2020

    Chicken Plant Hit With Sanctions By 'Flabbergasted' Judge

    A Delaware state judge has imposed $28,320 in sanctions against chicken processing plant Mountaire Corp. for overredacting documents produced in discovery in a suit over alleged water pollution, saying he was already "flabbergasted" by the company's conduct but more recent revelations in the case show it's gone too far.

  • July 01, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Northridge Project, All Year, Amazon

    A developer is reportedly hoping to build 51 apartment units in Northridge, California, All Year Management reportedly has a new deal to sell 68 New York apartment buildings for $302 million, and Amazon is said to be eyeing a new 1 million-square-foot development project in South Florida.

  • July 01, 2020

    3 Things To Watch As COVID-19 Real Estate Litigation Looms

    Commercial landlords and tenants have to a large extent not brought their disputes over payment of rent to court during the COVID-19 pandemic, but lawyers say several factors — including uncertainty about assistance under the CARES Act — are likely to usher in a wave of litigation soon. Here, Law360 looks at three things to watch for as litigation looms.

  • July 01, 2020

    Pa. Landlord Demands Rent From Virus-Closed Restaurant

    The landlord for a historic office building in downtown Pittsburgh is demanding that a restaurant pay its back rent plus other damages related to breaking its lease when it permanently closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a lawsuit filed in Pennsylvania state court.

Expert Analysis

  • Captive Insurance May Help In A Pandemic, But Caution Is Key

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    Although captive insurance can help address some of the traditional coverage gaps exposed by the current COVID-19 crisis, three Tax Court cases from recent years illustrate the Internal Revenue Service's hostility toward the entities, says Patrick McCann at Chamberlain Hrdlicka.

  • Ill. Insurance Considerations For Losses Caused By Riots

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    On the heels of the Illinois Department of Insurance's recent call for leniency for policyholder claims related to recent riots, vandalism and civil commotion, insurers should expect heightened scrutiny of coverage disputes and policyholders should be prepared to submit extensive proofs of claims, say attorneys at Neal Gerber.

  • CARES Act Reanimates Sale-Leaseback Tax Benefits

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    Sale-leaseback transactions have new life thanks to the CARES Act's net operating loss changes, which give participants an opportunity to reduce effective tax rates, accelerate refunds and, in some cases, deduct 100% of their rental payments, say William Rohrer and Maximilian Viski-Hanka at Duane Morris.

  • COVID-19 Orders Unlikely To Constitute Temporary Takings

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    Although public agencies have issued a broad range of orders intended to slow the spread of COVID-19, they are likely safe from temporary takings claims due to the high hurdles for such claims and the expanded police powers granted to governments during public health emergencies, say Gene Tanaka and Emily Chaidez at Best Best.

  • Opinion

    Time To Consider Percentage Rental Agreements For Lawyers

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    It has long been the law that attorneys cannot use percentage rental agreements because doing so would constitute an impermissible sharing of fees with nonlawyers, but such arrangements can help lawyers match expenses with revenues in lean times like now, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson at Holland & Knight.

  • Key Points For Airports Considering Rent Relief For Tenants

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    Airport sponsors are highly motivated to offer rent abatements and other support to hard-hit commercial aeronautical tenants during the COVID-19 downturn — but airports must also keep in mind their obligations to stay economically self-sustaining and to treat similarly situated tenants equally, says Paul Fraidenburgh at Buchalter.

  • How Force Majeure Provisions Are Being Tested In New York

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    The Southern District of New York's recent rulings in E2W v. KidZania and Latino v. Clay, together with prior precedent, are illustrative of New York state and federal courts' attitude toward force majeure and whether such provisions might excuse contract performance during the pandemic, say Stephanie Denker and Christie McGuinness at Saul Ewing.

  • 'Settle And Sue' Malpractice Cases Have New Clarity In Calif.

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    A California state appellate court's recent decision in Masellis v. Law Office of Leslie F. Jensen provides a road map for proving causation and damages in settle-and-sue legal malpractice cases — an important issue of long-standing confusion, says Steven Berenson at Klinedinst.

  • What You Say In Online Mediation May Be Discoverable

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    Mediation conducted online with participants in different states makes it harder to determine where communications were made, increasing the risk that courts will apply laws of a state that does not protect mediation confidentiality, say mediators Jeff Kichaven and Teresa Frisbie and law student Tyler Codina.

  • 20 Years Later, E-Sign Act's Transformative Impact Continues

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    The Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act — signed into law on June 30, 2000 — has been the legal foundation for the electronic execution of trusted, enforceable digital contracts, and has enabled the lending economy to thrive despite the COVID-19 pandemic, says Stephen Bisbee at eOriginal.

  • How COVID-19 Impact Analysis May Shape MAE Disputes

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    Emerging disputes over whether the COVID-19 crisis has triggered a merger transaction’s material adverse effect clause shine a spotlight on the importance of showing whether the pandemic has disproportionately impacted particular industries and companies, say David Tabak and Edward Flores at NERA.

  • Mass. Court Deadline Tolling Will Cause Problems For Years

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    While Massachusetts' 106-day tolling period for all civil statutes of limitations ends Tuesday, the pandemic-related pause will complicate calculation of limitations periods and have ripple effects in many jurisdictions for years to come, says Christian Stephens at Eckert Seamans.

  • 10 Tips For A Successful Remote Arbitration Hearing

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    As I learned after completing a recent international arbitration remotely, with advance planning a video hearing can replicate the in-person experience surprisingly well, and may actually be superior in certain respects, says Kate Shih at Quinn Emanuel.

  • Opinion

    To Achieve Diversity, Law Firms Must Reinvent Hiring Process

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    If law firms are truly serious about making meaningful change in terms of diversity, they must adopt a demographically neutral, unbiased hiring equation that looks at personality traits with greater import than grades and class rank, says Thomas Latino at Florida State University College of Law.

  • Cybersecurity Steps For Law Firms Amid Heightened Risks

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    With large swaths of the population indoors and primarily online, cybercriminals will be able to exploit law firms more easily now than ever before, but some basic precautions can help, says Joel Wallenstrom at Wickr.

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