Sports & Betting

  • August 22, 2019

    NFL Player Calls Audible In Hail Mary Concussion Deal Appeal

    The closely watched appeal of a retired NFL player's claim denial in the concussion settlement has taken a left turn, with the player asking the Third Circuit to hold off on his case while he gives the federal judge overseeing the controversial deal a second chance to correct her "mistake."

  • August 22, 2019

    Racetracks Owner Sued For $46M Over Lease For Generators

    SunTrust Equipment Finance & Leasing Corp. filed suit Thursday against NASCAR and IndyCar racetrack owner International Speedway Corp. for refusing to pay “even a single dime” of the $46 million it claims it owes under a subleasing agreement for mobile solar generators.

  • August 22, 2019

    Avenatti Plans To Target Nike In $20M Extortion Trial

    Embattled celebrity attorney Michael Avenatti on Thursday signaled that he intends to go on the offensive against Nike Inc. at his upcoming trial on charges of trying to extort more than $20 million from the sportswear giant.

  • August 22, 2019

    Mr. T Hits Leafly With Trademark Suit Over 'Mrt' Weed

    Mr. T is claiming a popular marijuana website called Leafly infringed the actor's trademark rights by using "Mrt" to abbreviate a weed product named Mr. Tusk, according to a suit filed Thursday in California federal court.

  • August 22, 2019

    Gambler Says Feds Covered Up Leak Scandal To Jail Him

    A professional gambler convicted of insider trading is doubling down on his bid to overturn his charges, claiming FBI leaks marred the entire case and telling the U.S. Supreme Court it shouldn’t let the government sweep its “pervasive misconduct” under the rug.

  • August 22, 2019

    Soccer Leagues Say Rival Can't Claw Back Copy Of Feds Deal

    The former head of the North American Soccer League’s board of governors should not be allowed to claw back an unsigned version of a cooperation agreement he worked out with New York federal prosecutors, a federal judge heard.

  • August 22, 2019

    Ex-USC Coach Must Arbitrate Whistleblower Retaliation Suit

    A former football coach for the University of Southern California accusing the team of firing him in retaliation for reporting academic fraud and safety violations must arbitrate his claims, a California judge ruled Thursday.

  • August 21, 2019

    NCAA Athletes Must Produce Billing Records In $45M Fee Ask

    A California magistrate judge Wednesday granted the NCAA's request for attorneys representing student-athletes to produce five years of billing records to support their bid for $45 million in fees for winning a ban on certain pay restrictions but said the cost of producing records can be added to their fees.

  • August 21, 2019

    NFL Concussion Audits Are Valid, Judge Says

    The Pennsylvania federal judge overseeing the NFL concussion settlement has denied a request to prevent the program's claims administrator from conducting multiple audits of players' claims, saying the ability to do such audits is essential to "the honorable implementation of the settlement."

  • August 21, 2019

    Big Fish Casino Gambling Suit Paused For Arbitration Ruling

    A Washington state federal judge halted a suit against Churchill Downs Inc. and the new owners of the social casino platform Big Fish Casino pending a ruling on whether claims that the platform constitutes illegal gambling are subject to a user arbitration agreement.

  • August 21, 2019

    9th Circ. Ruling Puts Minor League Pay Back On The Table

    A year after Congress blocked minor league baseball players from seeking federal labor protections, a recent Ninth Circuit ruling has reopened the door for the athletes in their quest for better pay from Major League Baseball.

  • August 21, 2019

    Hunting Guide Deserves Permanent Work Permit, Oil Co. Says

    A Dallas-based oil and gas exploration and production company has asked a federal court to overturn the denial of a work authorization for a Zimbabwean big-game hunter who leads hunts for its executives and shareholders.

  • August 21, 2019

    MLB Umpire Promises New Evidence In Race Bias Suit

    A Major League Baseball umpire suing the league for racial discrimination told a New York federal court he has new evidence to support his claims, saying MLB executives admitted in depositions that they make promotion decisions based on arbitrary and subjective criteria.

  • August 21, 2019

    France Clears Ineos' €100M Deal For Soccer Club

    France's competition authority on Wednesday cleared chemical giant Ineos' reported €100 million ($111 million) purchase of a soccer club in Nice, marking the first transaction involving a soccer club reviewed by the agency.

  • August 20, 2019

    Ex-Rams Ticket Exec's 'Trash Talk' Suit Tossed, For Now

    A California federal judge on Tuesday threw out a suit brought by a former Los Angeles Rams ticket executive over the publishing of and reporting on private — and profane — "trash talk" text messages he sent a friend about New England Patriots safety Patrick Chung, an exchange that he says ultimately cost him his job.

  • August 20, 2019

    College's Actions Created Duty To Athletes, Pa. Justices Say

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that Lackawanna College left itself open to claims from two would-be football players by taking it upon itself to provide athletic trainers, who the two players claim were grossly unqualified, at the team’s tryouts.

  • August 20, 2019

    Mariners ADA Suit To Continue Over Seat Location, Sightlines

    Whether the Seattle Mariners must add more wheelchair-accessible seats and whether those seats must provide sightlines over standing spectators are questions for a jury to decide, a Washington judge has ruled, after siding with wheelchair-bound fans on some claims that T-Mobile Park is not compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

  • August 20, 2019

    Under Armour Latest Company Sued Over Milk Crate Logo

    Under Armour executives discussed design collaborations with Milkcrate Athletics before ripping off its trademarked milk crate logo, the latter company said in a lawsuit brought a week after filing a similar one against Adidas and the Brooklyn Nets.

  • August 20, 2019

    Sports Stock Market Owner Faces SEC's $1.5M Fraud Suit

    The Securities and Exchange Commission has sued the man behind an experimental sports marketplace, alleging he sold nearly $1.5 million in bogus shares by promising investors for years that he would properly register them soon.

  • August 19, 2019

    US Soccer Women's Pay Equity Suit Poised For May 2020 Trial

    The U.S. Soccer Federation and its world champion women’s national team will duke it out over pay equity in a trial slated for May 2020, a spokesperson for the players said Monday.

  • August 19, 2019

    Seeger Swats Away NFL Concussion Fee Objection Again

    Seeger Weiss LLP fired back on Monday against an objection to its latest $1.7 million fee request in the NFL concussion settlement, the most recent move in a pattern that's taken on an almost ritualistic quality as it's continued to repeat itself since the deal went into effect.

  • August 19, 2019

    Under Armour Ditches Stock-Drop Suit

    Athletic apparel company Under Armour on Monday escaped a proposed securities class action accusing it of hiding a decrease in demand for its products, with a Maryland federal judge finding the company’s investors failed to convincingly plead their case.

  • August 19, 2019

    Avenatti Rips Extortion Charges, Says He Was Doing His Job

    Embattled attorney Michael Avenatti on Monday urged a New York federal court to toss a criminal indictment that alleges he sought to extort Nike Inc. for millions of dollars, arguing he was simply doing his job as a lawyer representing the interests of his client.

  • August 19, 2019

    Ex-LA Times Columnist Wins $15M In Age, Disability Suit

    Former Los Angeles Times sports columnist T.J. Simers was awarded more than $15 million by a Los Angeles jury Monday in a second trial over claims that he was discriminated against based on his age and disability.

  • August 19, 2019

    No Way Around Atty Conflict In 'Varsity Blues,' Judge Says

    A Boston federal magistrate judge on Monday warned a parent charged in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal that, by sticking with a team of attorneys that also represents a former coach connected to the case, he risks receiving conflicted advice.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Litigation Finance Can And Should Protect Its Reputation

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    This month’s controversy surrounding alleged financial misrepresentations by Burford Capital underlines the need for litigation financiers to unite in educating the public about the value of litigation finance, lest opportunists use cases like this to disparage the industry as a whole, says Charles Agee at Westfleet Advisors.

  • Crisis Messaging To Protect Law Firm Brand And Bottom Line

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    When crises occur, such as data security incidents or gender bias suits, a well-prepared law firm has a thoroughly tested communications plan at the ready, which ensures the firm is the most proactive news source, prevents the crisis from escalating and notifies stakeholders about mitigation efforts, says Zach Olsen at Infinite Global.

  • Perspectives

    What You Should Know About Courtroom Closures

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    At attorney Greg Craig’s trial in D.C. federal court this week, the courtroom was cleared so prospective jurors could answer sensitive questions. Even seasoned litigators were left wondering about the nature of this subtle, yet significant, issue involving Sixth Amendment public trial rights, says Luke Cass at Quarles & Brady.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Seaweed Scientist's Odyssey

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    In the early 1980s, I was working on my Ph.D. in marine biology and ecology. As part of an international team of scientists studying oil spill impacts on marine ecosystems, I saw a niche opportunity to combine science and law, says Andrew Davis of Shipman & Goodwin.

  • How To Counter Jury Reliance On Plaintiff's Damages Ask

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    Years of interviewing jurors and observing deliberation show that the amount juries award in damages is almost always influenced by the amount of the plaintiff's demand, but there are three ways defense counsel can combat this anchoring effect, says Christina Marinakis at Litigation Insights.

  • 5th Amendment Strategy For Parallel Civil, Criminal Litigation

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    Whenever there is any prospect of criminal liability in civil litigation — as in the recent cases against Harvey Weinstein and former Theranos executives — it is important for both sides to understand the consequences of a party or key witness choosing to assert Fifth Amendment privilege, says Joshua Robbins at Greenberg Gross.

  • Opinion

    Clients Benefit From Law Firm Expense Growth

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    Although there continue to be corporate clients who are seduced by the idea that cheapest is always best when it comes to outside counsel, there are many negative implications on service delivery that result from myopically focusing only on cost reduction at the expense of quality and innovation, says Keith Maziarek at Katten Muchin.

  • Opinion

    Changing Ethics Rules Is Key To Law Firm Innovation

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    As demonstrated by the California bar proposal to allow nonlawyers to invest in law firms, we can change the legal ethics rules in a way that protects clients while permitting firms to innovate and serve clients better, say Todd Richheimer of ​​​​​​​Lawfty and Peter Joy of Washington University Law School.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Castillo Reviews 'Raising The Bar'

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    A timely new book, “Raising the Bar: Diversifying Big Law," is one of the first honest assessments of the challenging battleground for people of color at large law firms, and I hope that firm management committee members read it, says U.S. District Judge Rubén Castillo of the Northern District of Illinois.

  • Debunking 3 Myths About Contract Attorneys

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    Although contract attorneys represent a quality source of legal work, inaccurate assumptions cause many legal departments and law firms to hesitate when considering them, say Matthew Weaver and Shannon Murphy of Major Lindsey.

  • Opinion

    #MeToo Defendant Bankruptcies Can Delay, Not Deny, Justice

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    Institutional defendants facing sexual abuse claims are increasingly using bankruptcy filings to freeze litigation, and those representing survivors need to be aware of the different rules, deadlines and discovery procedures in the new venue to ensure their clients' claims are not lost, says Michelle Tuegel of Seeger Weiss.

  • Compliance Imperatives For Defensible Data Disposal

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    Companies in a host of industries have recently faced steep compliance fines for data breaches from domestic and international regulators. Defensible disposal of corporate data presents an excellent opportunity to mitigate the impact of these data-driven risks, says Julia Brickell of H5.

  • Key Defense Strategies For Sports Head Trauma Lawsuits

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    Athletes who claim sports caused brain trauma are increasingly suing teams, leagues, schools and equipment manufacturers — sometimes years after leaving the playing field. And plaintiffs’ lawsuits are making it past dispositive motions, requiring defendants to mount creative defenses against these claims, say Jason Meyer and Robert Olson of Gordon Rees.

  • A Litigator’s Reflections From The Arbitrator’s Chair

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's opinions this term in Henry Schein and Lamps Plus remind us of the fundamental difference between arbitration and litigation. Yet, as a commercial litigator who serves as a neutral arbitrator, I have observed that experienced litigators often fail to adapt their approach in arbitration, says Paula Litt at Honigman.

  • The Latest Fed. Circ. Move On Patent Eligibility

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    The Federal Circuit had never conclusively stated that a presumption of validity applies to a patent challenged on Section 101 grounds until its recent Cellspin v. Fitbit decision, which invokes and responds to two earlier decisions, Berkheimer and Aatrix, says Anthony Fuga of Holland & Knight.