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Sports

  • November 13, 2018

    NHL Ends Concussion MDL With $19M Tentative Settlement

    The National Hockey League has agreed to pay nearly $19 million to end multidistrict litigation brought by more than 300 retired players alleging they endured long-term problems from head trauma suffered on the ice, a deal some experts said fell short of expectations after the league put up a stiff defense.

  • November 13, 2018

    FIFA Cooperator Dodges Prison For Bribery Scheme

    Eduardo Li, a former FIFA official and president of the Costa Rican Football Federation, avoided a prison term Tuesday after copping to racketeering and corruption charges, due to his cooperation with New York federal prosecutors in their wide-ranging corruption probe into international soccer.

  • November 13, 2018

    Int'l Tennis Federation Establishes New Ethics Body

    The International Tennis Federation has approved a new Code of Ethics and created a new Ethics Commission, a move the federation said was a "key pillar" of its strategy to protect the sport’s long-term popularity.

  • November 13, 2018

    Fed. Circ. Affirms Ax Of Darts-Refereeing Patent Under Alice

    The Federal Circuit on Tuesday ruled a patent covering a refereeing system for darts games was invalid under the U.S. Supreme Court’s Alice test, solidifying Arachnid 360 LLC’s victory in a patent suit brought by a rival electronic dartboard maker.

  • November 13, 2018

    Ex-CEO Accused Of Tipping Oriole Reaches $1.5M SEC Deal

    The former CEO of a medical optics firm accused of passing insider information to a former Baltimore Orioles player reached a $1.5 million deal with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, according to papers filed in California federal court Tuesday.

  • November 13, 2018

    Insurer Says Sports Bar Not Covered In Customers' Crash Suit

    Atlantic Casualty Insurance Co. filed suit Tuesday against a sports bar it insures to avoid paying for an underlying suit by four customers over an intoxicated patron who crashed his car into the Cincinnati-area bar, telling an Ohio federal court that several exclusions apply to bar coverage.

  • November 12, 2018

    NCAA Argues Fans ‘Overwhelmingly Oppose’ Paying Athletes

    The NCAA defended its rules limiting athlete compensation in a landmark antitrust California federal bench trial on Friday, arguing that college sports fans value amateurism and “overwhelmingly oppose” paying student athletes.

  • November 9, 2018

    Golden State Warriors Sued For Retaliation, Failure To Pay OT

    The National Basketball Association’s Golden State Warriors are facing a suit in California federal court from a former group ticket salesman who claims the team fired him for complaining about withheld pay and disability discrimination.

  • November 9, 2018

    Brand Battles: Adidas, Ohio State, 'Black Panther,' Yankees

    In Law360's latest roundup of new actions at the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, Adidas picks a fight with Ohio State University over a stripe on football helmets, Disney's Marvel aims to block a "Wakanda Wine Fest," and the New York Yankees say a "WS NY" brand could be mistaken for something related to the World Series.

  • November 9, 2018

    Gibson Dunn Launches Gaming Practice After High Court Win

    Months after securing a U.S. Supreme Court decision that felled a major barrier to sports betting, Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP said Thursday it was launching an international betting and gaming practice.

  • November 9, 2018

    Taxation With Representation: Kirkland, Vinson, Wachtell

    In this week’s Taxation With Representation, Thoma Bravo inks a $950 million deal with Broadcom Inc. for Veracode, Newell Brands sells off its fishing business and memorabilia manufacturer for $2.5 billion, Western Gas Partners nabs Anadarko Petroleum Corp. midstream energy assets for $4 billion, and Edenred SA buys Corporate Spending Innovations for $600 million.

  • November 9, 2018

    As Pirates Settle, Net Installer Last Defendant In Foul-Ball Suit

    The Pittsburgh Pirates reached a settlement with a woman injured by a foul ball at PNC Park in 2015, attorneys said Friday, but a jury trial under a new judge in state court scheduled to get underway Wednesday will determine the liability of the company that installed the allegedly defective safety netting behind home plate.

  • November 8, 2018

    Africa Women's Cup Ruling Appealed To Arbitration Court

    Kenya's soccer association has asked the Court of Arbitration for Sport to overturn a decision allowing Equatorial Guinea to compete in the upcoming Africa Women's Cup of Nations tournament after the rival country was previously banned from the competition for allegedly fielding an ineligible player.

  • November 8, 2018

    Ex-Soccer Execs Unlikely To Owe FIFA $28M, Judge Hints

    A federal judge indicated in a Brooklyn courtroom Thursday that she does not believe criminal law supports forcing two convicted soccer officials to compensate FIFA for $28 million it spent investigating widespread corruption after they were arrested.

  • November 8, 2018

    Net Installer Wants Judge Off Pa. Foul Ball Injury Suit

    The company that installed safety netting at the Pittsburgh Pirates’ PNC Park wants a new state court judge for the upcoming case of a woman injured by a foul ball behind home plate, alleging improper communication between the current judge and one of the woman’s attorneys.

  • November 8, 2018

    Insurer Says County, Racetrack Not Covered In Crash Suit

    Evanston Insurance Co. on Wednesday asked a California federal court to rule that it has no further obligation to defend or indemnify Monterey County or the operator of a Salinas-based racetrack in a lawsuit over a motorcycle accident at the track, saying the claims are outside the scope of its policy.

  • November 8, 2018

    Architectural Firm Tries To Duck Stadium Roof Design Suit

    A Michigan-based architectural firm has asked a New York federal court to dismiss a suit alleging it and other firms stole designs for retractable stadium roofs, saying the district has no jurisdiction over the firm since it has no employees or place of business there.

  • November 8, 2018

    Texas Appeals Court Says El Paso Can Use Arena For Sports

    A Texas appellate court has ruled that an El Paso ordinance does not bar the city from using a multipurpose performing arts and entertainment facility for sports, reversing a lower court’s decision against the city.

  • November 8, 2018

    Former Dolphins Doctor Cleared In Ex-Player's Med Mal Trial

    A Florida jury has cleared a former Miami Dolphins team doctor in a suit brought by ex-player Otis “O.J.” McDuffie accusing him of negligence in failing to properly treat a toe injury that McDuffie says derailed his career.

  • November 8, 2018

    NJ Justices Won't Revisit Axed Guilty Plea In Giants Tix Scam

    Prosecutors in New Jersey have fallen short in their bid to reinstate a man’s theft conviction in an alleged scheme involving the sale of New York Giants tickets, after the state Supreme Court declined to review a ruling that nixed his guilty plea because he did not admit to obtaining the victims’ money by deception.

Expert Analysis

  • It’s Time For Law Firms To Start Talking About Gen Z

    Eliza Stoker

    Since the oldest members of Generation Z aren’t even finished with law school yet, law firm management is in a unique position to prepare for their entrance into the legal workforce, says Eliza Stoker of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • Q&A

    Back To School: Yale's Linda Greenhouse Talks Journalism

    Linda Greenhouse

    In this series featuring law school luminaries, Yale Law School lecturer and Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Linda Greenhouse discusses her coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, the conservatives' long game and trends in journalism.

  • Opinion

    Celebrate Veterans By Improving Their Access To Justice

    Linda Klein

    Attorneys should think beyond the Veterans Day parades and use their time and talents to help the many veterans facing urgent legal issues, says Linda Klein of Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC.

  • Opinion

    US Government Should Manage US Olympics

    Ronald Katz

    This week's news that the U.S. Olympic Committee is taking over the role of USA Gymnastics was surprising because both organizations have been implicated in the same sexual abuse scandals. There is good reason to replace the USOC with a U.S. government agency, says Ronald Katz of GCA Law Partners LLP.

  • Opinion

    Time To Reclaim Wellness For All Lawyers

    Leesa Klepper

    The decision last month by Baker McKenzie’s global chairman to step down due to exhaustion indicates that the legal profession needs to mount a broader wellness effort to address long hours, high stress, frequent travel and the daily demands of practice, says Leesa Klepper, director of Thrivewell Coaching.

  • Surveying The State Of Workplace Harassment Investigations

    Jason Schwartz

    We recently reviewed for-profit companies that investigated workplace harassment allegations over the past six years and examined how they handled the release of information. Our findings reveal emerging trends and considerations for companies deciding whether to release post-investigation reports, say attorneys with Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • Protecting Law Firm Talent At Both Ends

    Susan Blakely

    By 2030, it is possible that 75 percent of lawyers practicing in the U.S. will be millennials. A broadened focus on retention and advancement of all young lawyers is therefore a logical step forward but it fails to address another major retention issue that law firms should explore, says Susan Smith Blakely of LegalPerspectives LLC.

  • Q&A

    Wendy Olson Talks Twin Falls, Tribes, Private Practice

    Wendy Olson

    Former U.S. Attorney for the District of Idaho Wendy Olson discusses her decades of experience prosecuting white collar crimes and civil rights violations, her work and challenges as U.S. attorney, and her move to private practice.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Brown Reviews 'Dangerous Leaders'

    Judge Nannette Jolivette Brown

    Anthony Thompson’s "Dangerous Leaders: How and Why Lawyers Must Be Taught to Lead" explores the conflict many lawyers face when charged with the responsibility of leadership. The book is an excellent read for all lawyers, says U.S. District Chief Judge Nannette Jolivette Brown of the Eastern District of Louisiana.

  • Breaking The Rules: 3 Ways To 'Lead' A Direct Examination

    Matthew Menchel

    Trial lawyers are frequently taught that they should appear invisible during direct examination — that their job is merely to prompt the witness to start speaking. But the most powerful direct examinations are the ones in which the examiner, not the witness, is controlling the pace, say attorneys with Kobre & Kim LLP.