Sports & Betting

  • June 21, 2021

    Justices Send NCAA Message: Change Or Face More Suits

    By rejecting the NCAA's arguments that its amateurism system should get blanket protection from antitrust challenges, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday made clear that the organization must allow athletes to profit from or share in the revenues of college sports — or face an uncertain future of litigation.

  • June 21, 2021

    High Court NCAA Ruling May Be Win For Athlete Labor Rights

    The U.S. Supreme Court struck a blow to the NCAA's restrictions on athlete compensation Monday in a highly anticipated antitrust ruling, and experts said a concurring opinion from Justice Brett Kavanaugh could lead to further expansions of athletes' rights, including under federal labor law.

  • June 21, 2021

    College Athletes Call Justices' NCAA Ruling A Game Changer

    Current and former college athletes nationwide on Monday celebrated a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that they said will provide life-changing benefits for many players while adding momentum to an ongoing push to let athletes monetize their names and images.

  • June 21, 2021

    Endeavor Execs Quit Live Nation Board After DOJ Scrutiny

    Two top executives of entertainment giant Endeavor Group vacated their seats on Live Nation's board after the U.S. Department of Justice raised concerns that their dual roles violated the Clayton Act's ban on interlocking directorates, the DOJ said Monday.

  • June 21, 2021

    Netflix Says 'Varsity Blues' Defamation Suit Is Judge's To Toss

    Netflix told a Massachusetts federal judge Monday that a jurisdictional issue should not stop him from hearing and dismissing a defamation suit by a parent whose role in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions case was noted in a documentary on the streaming service.

  • June 21, 2021

    USPTO Rejects 'Washington Football Team' TM Application

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has issued an early rejection to the NFL's Washington Football Team in its efforts to register its recently changed name as a trademark, ruling the name merely a geographic term.

  • June 21, 2021

    Paramedic Drops Suit Against Astros For Foul Ball Injury

    A paramedic who was seriously injured when a line-drive foul ball hit him in the face in October during the American League Championship Series in Houston has dropped his lawsuit against the Houston Astros seeking more than $1 million in damages.

  • June 21, 2021

    High Court Says NCAA Can't Limit Athlete Education Pay

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday affirmed a ruling that struck down NCAA rules restricting education-related compensation and benefits for college athletes, finding that the organization should not get special treatment under antitrust law.

  • June 18, 2021

    Puerto Ricans Tell High Court To Nix Cockfighting Ban

    A group of Puerto Ricans supporting what they call the island's tradition of cockfighting asked the U.S. Supreme Court to take up their case, arguing that Congress overstepped its constitutional powers to criminalize the sport.

  • June 18, 2021

    U. Of Idaho Improperly Cut Athlete Scholarships, NCAA Says

    The University of Idaho was hit with two years of probation and its financial aid staff will have to undergo NCAA compliance education for violating NCAA rules by improperly reducing the value of athletic scholarships for 139 athletes without notice or providing an opportunity for a hearing.

  • June 18, 2021

    Soccer League's Age Limit Further Blocked For Antitrust Fouls

    An Oregon federal judge on Thursday extended a court order barring the National Women's Soccer League from enforcing its 18-and-up age restriction, finding that teen soccer prodigy Olivia Moultrie had presented further evidence that the rule illegally limits competition since winning a temporary block last month.

  • June 18, 2021

    Ex-Penguins Coach's Firing Dispute Headed For Arbitration

    A former minor league hockey coach must arbitrate allegations that the Pittsburgh Penguins illegally fired him in retaliation for reporting that his wife was sexually assaulted by a fellow coach, a federal magistrate judge recommended Thursday.

  • June 18, 2021

    Netflix Attys Face Sanctions Threat In 'Varsity Blues' Doc Suit

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Thursday ordered Netflix's lawyers at Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP to explain why they shouldn't be sanctioned for failing to follow a prior court order in a defamation suit brought by one of the parents ensnared in the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal.

  • June 17, 2021

    Feds Seek Hard Time For Avenatti In Nike Extortion Case

    New York federal prosecutors are clamoring for a stiff prison term for Michael Avenatti, who was convicted at trial on fraud and extortion charges over a scheme to squeeze Nike Inc. for upward of $25 million in exchange for holding back on negative press coverage.

  • June 17, 2021

    Ex-Astros Owner Must Face Suit Over Ill-Fated Network Deal

    Billionaire former Houston Astros owner Drayton McLane Jr. and Comcast Corp. can't use a Texas free speech law to duck claims that they lied to get a better price for the team and its stake in a now-bankrupt regional sports network, a state appellate court held Thursday.

  • June 17, 2021

    NCAA Athlete Health Often An Afterthought, Sens. Told

    The well-being of college athletes, particularly in women's sports, is frequently an afterthought for both the NCAA and their school, three female current and former NCAA athletes told federal lawmakers Thursday as they called for legislation to allow athletes not only to monetize their names, images and likenesses but also to protect their mental and physical health.

  • June 17, 2021

    Rapper's NBA Video Game Dance IP Suit Is Moved To Georgia

    The ball is in Georgia courts now that a California judge has deemed the Peach State a better forum for resolving whether the developers of video game NBA2K19 ripped off a rapper's copyrighted dance move.

  • June 17, 2021

    Rising Star: Wilkinson Stekloff's Rakesh Kilaru

    Over the past year, Wilkinson Stekloff LLP partner Rakesh Kilaru has helped the NCAA fight a massive case that could forever alter college sports, defended the NFL in protracted antitrust litigation, and secured a jury verdict on behalf of the NCAA in a defamation lawsuit, earning him a spot as one of four sports and betting attorneys under 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • June 17, 2021

    Manatt Settles Contract Suit Over Under Armour Claims

    The manufacturer of a trademarked bioceramic material has settled a breach of contract and fraudulent inducement lawsuit with Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP that accused the firm of failing to sue Under Armour Inc. over alleged false advertising claims, according to an order filed Wednesday in New York federal court.

  • June 16, 2021

    Panel Says Insurer Needn't Cover School District's Injury Suit

    The Ninth Circuit freed Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Co. from having to cover a California school district in an underlying suit over a spectator's injury at a soccer field, siding with the lower court that the policy's premise defect exclusion bars coverage.

  • June 16, 2021

    5 Ways Companies Can Prep For Biden's Anti-Corruption Push

    With President Joe Biden gung-ho about fighting corruption, new anti-money laundering rules looming, and vulnerabilities that were amplified by the pandemic, companies should act now to reexamine and bolster their compliance programs, experts say.

  • June 16, 2021

    Ohio Senate Greenlights Mobile, In-Person Sports Betting

    The Buckeye State took a big step toward joining the increasing number of states to legalize sports betting on Wednesday, as the Ohio Senate passed a bill to legalize both mobile betting and betting at brick-and-mortar facilities, sending it to the House for consideration.

  • June 16, 2021

    Robbins Geller Wants To Fight FIFA Suit DQ At 2nd Circ.

    Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP has asked a New York federal judge to give the firm time to appeal his ruling that it committed fraud worthy of disqualification by failing to disclose short positions held by the lead plaintiff in a securities class action stemming from the FIFA corruption scandal, a request the defendant company said comes way too late.

  • June 16, 2021

    Rising Star: Jones Day's Marc A. Weinroth

    Marc A. Weinroth of Jones Day is defending more than a dozen universities in federal multidistrict litigation consolidating more than 500 putative class actions led against the NCAA, conferences and universities by college football athletes seeking damages relating to the long-term cognitive effects of participation in college football, earning him a spot among the top sports & betting law practitioners under age 40 honored as Law360 Rising Stars.

  • June 15, 2021

    MGM Drops Suit Against DOI Over Tribal Gambling Compacts

    MGM Resorts has asked a D.C. federal court to dismiss the company's lawsuit claiming the U.S. Department of the Interior's approval of altered tribal gambling agreements in Connecticut gave two tribes an unfair competitive edge in their plans to build a $300 million casino.

Expert Analysis

  • Attorneys Beware: Zoom Depositions Are Likely Inadmissible

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    As legal proceedings have moved online in light of the pandemic, lawyers may mistakenly believe that recorded Zoom video depositions can be entered as evidence, but without certain safeguards, the testimony is unlikely to be accepted by courts, says Phillip Zisook at Schoenberg Finkel.

  • Opinion

    NJ Fed. Court Should Ditch Litigation Funding Disclosure Plan

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    The District of New Jersey's wide-reaching proposal to require automatic disclosure of third-party litigation finance poses several problems for attorneys and litigants alike and should be nipped in the bud, say Sarah Williams and Marlon Becerra at Validity Finance.

  • Law Firm Talent Must Reflect Shifting US Demographics

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    Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks and Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan analyze and project U.S. demographic trends to show that law firms that hope to succeed long-term must recruit, retain and advance female lawyers and lawyers of color, and they outline six steps for meeting these goals.

  • A Biz Strategy Model To Improve Lateral Atty Hiring Diversity

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    Quantitative comparison tools commonly used by companies in evaluating merger targets will allow law firms to assess lateral hire candidates in a demographically neutral manner, help remove bias from the hiring process and bring real diversity to the legal profession, says Thomas Latino at Florida State University.

  • Smaller Firms Need Employee Wellness Programs, Too

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    As we emerge from the pandemic, small and midsize firms — which offer an ideal setting for companywide connection — should follow in the footsteps of larger organizations and heed the American Bar Association’s recommendations by adopting well-being initiatives and appointing a chief wellness officer, says Janine Pollack at Calcaterra Pollack.

  • Stop Networking, Start Relationship Marketing

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    USA 500 Clubs' Joe Chatham offers four tips for lawyers to get started with relationship marketing — an approach to business development that prioritizes authentic connections — and explains why it may be more helpful than traditional networking post-pandemic.

  • What Attorneys Should Know About Fee Deferral

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    Milestone Consulting’s John Bair explores contingency-fee structuring considerations for attorneys, laying out the advantages — such as tax benefits and income control — as well as caveats and investment options.

  • Predictions On Pandemic's Lasting Impact On Legal Education

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    The pandemic accelerated the pace of technological change for legal education, and some of the changes to how law school courses are taught and on-campus interviews are conducted may be here to stay, says Leonard Baynes at the University of Houston.

  • Lawyer Perfectionism Is A Disease We Can Control

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    The pursuit of perfection that is prevalent among lawyers can lead to depression, anxiety and other mental health impacts, but new attorneys and industry leaders alike can take four steps to treat this malady, says Liam Montgomery at Williams & Connolly.

  • TM Litigation Lessons From Nike-Lil Nas X 'Satan Shoes' Fight

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    Though recently settled, Nike's curious trademark infringement dispute with the New York design studio behind rapper Lil Nas X's controversial "Satan Shoes" suggests that brand owners should draft complaints promptly, even if imperfectly, and evaluate first-sale doctrine exceptions, says James Major at Stradley Ronon.

  • 5 Tips To Help Your 2021 Summer Associates Succeed

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    Despite pandemic-related challenges this year, law firms can effectively train summer associates on writing and communicating — without investing more time than they ordinarily would, says Julie Schrager at Schiff Hardin.

  • Firms Should Use Surveys To Make Smart Legal Tech Choices

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    The utility of legal technology innovations may be limited without clear data and objectives from the outset, but targeted surveys can provide specific insights that enable law firms to adopt the most appropriate and efficient tech solutions, says Tim Scott at Frogslayer.

  • Don't Forget Due Diligence In Race For Lateral Associate Hires

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    Amid high demand for associates and aggressive competition to attract talent, law firms should take three key steps to conduct meaningful prehire due diligence and safeguard against lateral hiring mistakes that can hurt their revenue and reputation, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • Addressing Environmental Justice As Part Of ESG Initiatives

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    Recent calls for racial equity and government regulators' increasing focus on social and environmental concerns make this a good time for companies to integrate environmental justice into their environmental, social and governance efforts, say Stacey Halliday and Julius Redd at Beveridge & Diamond, and Jesse Glickstein at Hewlett Packard.

  • Lessons In Civility From The Alex Oh Sanctions Controversy

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    Alex Oh’s abrupt departure from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and admonishment by a D.C. federal judge over conduct in an Exxon human rights case demonstrate three major costs of incivility to lawyers, and highlight the importance of teaching civility in law school, says David Grenardo at St. Mary's University.

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