Sports & Betting

  • November 15, 2019

    'Varsity Blues' Bribe Middleman Cops To Racketeering Charge

    The former head of a Texas tennis academy pled guilty to racketeering conspiracy for acting as a middleman for the mastermind of the “Varsity Blues” college admissions case, admitting he helped the children of wealthy parents be admitted to college as phony tennis recruits.

  • November 15, 2019

    New York Project Lands $79M Loan From Madison, Hana

    Developer Real Estate Equities has landed $79.1 million in financing for a Manhattan mixed-use project from Madison Realty Capital and South Korea-based financial services firm Hana Financial Group, according to a Friday announcement from Madison Realty.

  • November 15, 2019

    Manchester City's Appeal Of Finance Probe Rejected

    The Court of Arbitration for Sport said Friday that Manchester City’s appeal of a Union of European Football Associations decision to initiate a probe of potential finance rule violations must be dismissed, as the club was attempting to challenge a non-final ruling.

  • November 14, 2019

    Ohhh Noooo! NBC Sued After Golf Channel Features Mr. Bill

    The company that owns Mr. Bill, the fictional clay character that rose to fame after appearing on “Saturday Night Live” in the 1970s, on Thursday sued NBCUniversal Media LLC and the Golf Channel over a recent video featuring the character, claiming NBCUniversal has illegally treated Mr. Bill as its property for decades.

  • November 14, 2019

    Memphis Hoops Star Drops NCAA Suit, Ruled Ineligible

    The University of Memphis on Thursday said basketball star James Wiseman is unable to play in games after the freshman dropped a lawsuit against the school and the NCAA seeking to overturn the NCAA's decision to rule him ineligible because his family allegedly accepted money from his coach. 

  • November 14, 2019

    Ex-NFL Player Agrees To Pay $1.25M Concussion Deal Loan

    An ailing retired NFL player has agreed to pay litigation funder Thrivest $1.25 million to repay a $500,000 loan tied to the NFL concussion settlement, ending a yearslong legal battle and foreshadowing victory for Thrivest in more than 30 similar cases.

  • November 14, 2019

    Pa. Firm Sent Ex-Client To Lawyer To Sue It For Negligence

    Pennsylvania law firm Conner Riley Friedman & Weichler has been accused of missing the deadline for filing a personal injury suit against a Gannon University student’s ex-roommate, but did recommend to her a lawyer who could sue the firm, according to the negligence suit made public Wednesday in Pennsylvania state court.

  • November 14, 2019

    Geragos-Tied Charges Gone In Avenatti's Nike Extortion Case

    Federal prosecutors in Manhattan on Wednesday dropped charges against Michael Avenatti that accused him of conspiring with fellow celebrity lawyer Mark Geragos in a plot to extort Nike, but added an accusation that Avenatti defrauded his client along the way.

  • November 14, 2019

    NBA Slams $50M Suit Alleging It Stole Betting App Idea

    The NBA is hitting back hard against a man who says the league stole his $50 million idea for a prop betting app, telling a California federal court that “each and every one” of his claims fall flat due to a total lack of relevant evidence.

  • November 14, 2019

    Labor Board Lets Calif. Ski Resort Hire Cooks On H-2B Visas

    A California ski resort that once hosted the Winter Olympics got the green light Wednesday to hire more than a dozen cooks under the migrant guest-worker program after the U.S. Department of Labor found the resort had actually submitted the correct documents.

  • November 14, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Dream Hotels, Zaragon, Carlyle

    A Dream Hotels venture has reportedly sold a Chicago property at a loss for $13 million, Zaragon is said to have dropped $12 million on a former USA Today distribution site in Florida, and a financing arm of Carlyle Group and Slate Property is said to have loaned $44 million for a Manhattan development site.

  • November 13, 2019

    FIFA Bans Ex-Soccer Boss, Acquitted In US, Over $7M Scheme

    A former official for the South American soccer confederation CONMEBOL who was acquitted on racketeering charges in the U.S. is now banned for life from the sport after international governing body FIFA found him guilty of taking $6.6 million in bribes.

  • November 13, 2019

    'Common Thief' Gets Longest 'Varsity Blues' Sentence Yet

    A Boston federal judge blasted a parent who admitted to paying $450,000 to have his children falsely designated as athletic recruits, calling him a "common thief" before sentencing him Wednesday to six months in prison, the longest sentence to date in the “Varsity Blues” college admissions scandal.

  • November 13, 2019

    DOI Pushes For End To MGM Suit Over Tribal Casino Plan

    The U.S. government urged a D.C. federal court to toss MGM Resorts' suit over a $300 million planned tribal casino, saying the government’s decision to approve amendments clearing the way for a casino was straightforward and legal.

  • November 13, 2019

    SEC Urges 11th Circ. To Not Touch Its Win In $5M Fraud Row

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has urged the Eleventh Circuit not to overturn its win in a Georgia federal court case where an Alabama attorney was ordered to pay nearly $5 million for purportedly defrauding former NBA star Charles Barkley and other investors out of millions of dollars.

  • November 13, 2019

    Revenue Sharing Allowed In Indian Gaming Pacts, Calif. Says

    States can impose tax-like revenue sharing fees on Native American gambling proceeds and are not prohibited by federal law from including the issue in negotiations with state tribes over gambling agreements, the California government has told a federal court.

  • November 13, 2019

    NFL, Security Workers Get Green Light For OT Suit Settlement

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday approved a settlement between the National Football League and a group of security personnel who claimed the league treated them as employees but classified them as consultants in an “elaborate scheme” to avoid paying taxes, overtime and other legally required employment benefits.

  • November 13, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Undoes $3M Patent Win For Columbia Sportswear

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday wiped out Columbia Sportswear's $3 million win in its patent suit against rival Seirus over the designs of cold-weather gear, finding that the judge improperly resolved factual issues that should have been reserved for a jury.

  • November 13, 2019

    Ex-Nike Running Coach, Doctor Appeal 4-Year Doping Bans

    The former head coach of Nike's now-defunct professional long-distance running program and a sports doctor associated with the project have appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport over the four-year suspensions issued against them by the American Arbitration Association.

  • November 13, 2019

    Clinic Wants NFL Benefits Suit Back In Ill. For Appeal

    An Illinois federal judge said Wednesday that he would take steps to return to Chicago a clinic's suit alleging the NFL directed Cigna to deny claims the clinic submitted for retired players' medical care, but he's unsure whether he still has authority over the case after transferring it to Texas.

  • November 13, 2019

    'Sham' UN Org Exec Pleads Not Guilty To Crypto Coin Fraud

    The president of a sports group that prosecutors called a "sham" United Nations affiliate pled not guilty in Manhattan federal court on Wednesday to charges that he defrauded investors with a phony cryptocurrency initial coin offering.

  • November 13, 2019

    Insurer Asks For Win In Dolphins Stadium Renovation Fight

    Berkley Assurance is asking a New York federal court for a win against a contractor seeking coverage for a claim stemming from the renovation of the Miami Dolphins’ Hard Rock Stadium, arguing the contractor reported the claim after its policy expired.

  • November 13, 2019

    Artist Capital Management Closes $100M Esports Fund

    Investment management firm Artist Capital Management raised $100 million for its first investment fund which would connect investors to the growing esports market, the firm said Wednesday.

  • November 13, 2019

    Pepsi Didn't Steal Super Bowl Ad, Judge Says

    Pepsi won a ruling Wednesday ending a copyright lawsuit that claimed it stole the idea for a Super Bowl commercial from an ad agency’s unused pitch, a decision that said the two had “few, if any similarities.”

  • November 13, 2019

    'Varsity Blues' Test Admin Cops To Taking $200K In Bribes

    A former test administrator who prosecutors say reeled in nearly $200,000 in bribes for allowing students to cheat on standardized tests as part of the “Varsity Blues” college admissions case pled guilty Wednesday in Massachusetts federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • Texas Could Take Page From Mass.'s Judicial Selection Book

    Author Photo

    As Texas and other states review their judicial election processes, they would be well served by taking guidance from Massachusetts' Governor’s Council system, which protects the judiciary from the hazards of campaigning, says Richard Baker of New England Intellectual Property.

  • Federal Laws Continue To Hinder State Sports Betting Trend

    Author Photo

    Even as Colorado last week joined a growing wave of states legalizing sports betting, federal laws designed to assist states in gambling enforcement remain a roadblock to commonsense legislation and state cooperation in this area, says Dennis Ehling of Blank Rome.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: McKeown Reviews 'Conversations With RBG'

    Author Photo

    Reading Jeffrey Rosen’s "Conversations With RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law" is like eavesdropping on the author and his subject while they discuss how the restrained judicial minimalist became the fiery leader of the opposition, says Ninth Circuit Judge M. Margaret McKeown.

  • What NCAA Publicity Rights Guidance Means For Athletes

    Author Photo

    Following the recent release of NCAA student-athlete compensation guidelines, it remains unclear how disparate governing bodies will choose to set rules, leaving student-athletes seeking to commercialize their names, images or likenesses through contracts or trademark rights with a confusing mix of incentives and prohibitions, says Radhika Raman of Knobbe Martens.

  • Support For Federal Anti-Doping Bill Seems To Be Waning

    Author Photo

    A federal bill that would criminalize international doping fraud conspiracies in sports would fill a necessary gap in U.S. enforcement policy, but it may take several more doping scandals before this type of legislation becomes reality, say Gavin Parrish and Miguel Salcedo of FTI Consulting.

  • Where A Litigator's Advice Can Improve Agreement Drafting

    Author Photo

    Transactional attorneys should consider consulting with litigation counsel when drafting certain contractual provisions — choice of law, choice of forum, attorney fees and others — that could come into play in a broad range of substantive disputes, says Adrienne Koch at Katsky Korins.

  • Opinion

    Flat-Fee Legal Billing Can Liberate Attorneys

    Author Photo

    Replacing hourly billing with flat-fee arrangements, especially for appellate work, will leave attorneys feeling free to spend as much time as necessary to produce their highest quality work, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Spoliation Rule Remains Ambiguous Despite Amendments

    Author Photo

    Although the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure were amended to provide a uniform standard of culpability for spoliation, cases with similar facts are still reaching differing results because the rule does not specify how a court should evaluate a party's intent, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton.

  • Taxation Of Student-Athletes: Untangling Law And Policy

    Author Photo

    In reaction to California’s new law allowing student-athletes to accept paid endorsements, a U.S. senator is introducing legislation to tax athletic scholarships. The ensuing discussion shows that the current tax treatment of scholarships is not well understood, says professor Samuel Brunson of Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

  • Opinion

    To Abate Corruption, IAAF Must Change More Than Its Name

    Author Photo

    The remedy for some very serious, and even criminal, problems currently plaguing the International Association of Athletics Federations — soon to be known as World Athletics — is nothing less than a total change in culture and leadership, says Ronald Katz at GCA Law.

  • 5 Trends Influencing RFPs For Law Firms

    Author Photo

    Requests for proposals, the standard tool of companies evaluating law firms, are becoming better suited to the legal industry, says Matthew Prinn of RFP Advisory Group.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Being There For Families In Trouble

    Author Photo

    My parents' contentious, drawn-out divorce was one of the worst experiences of my life. But it taught me how to be resilient — and ultimately led me to leave corporate litigation for a career in family law, helping other families during their own difficult times, says Sheryl Seiden of Seiden Family Law.

  • Kawhi Leonard Faces Hurdles In Logo Dispute With Nike

    Author Photo

    A California federal court's ruling in Kawhi Leonard v. Nike — that an exclusive ownership of intellectual property provision in the parties' endorsement contract applies to a claw logo copyrighted by Nike but allegedly created by Leonard — highlights some of the obstacles Leonard will have to overcome to prevail in the ongoing case, says Joseph Vernon of Miller Canfield.

  • Examine Diversity Jurisdiction By Drilling Into Citizenship

    Excerpt from Lexis Practice Advisor
    Author Photo

    Getting in or out of federal court on the basis of diversity jurisdiction frequently involves exploring important citizenship issues below the surface, or else a late-show jurisdiction defect could cause a case to be dismissed, says Jim Wagstaffe at Wagstaffe von Loewenfeldt.

  • The Disruptive Potential Of Calif.'s College Athlete Pay Law

    Author Photo

    Although solutions to competing positions on California’s law allowing college athletes to accept paid endorsements are uncertain, it’s clear the legislation will have far-reaching implications for the NCAA, student-athletes and member schools, say Baird Fogel and David Canales at Morgan Lewis.