Sports & Betting

  • September 13, 2019

    Venable Sacks Ex-NFL Player's Suit Over Mayweather Fight

    A California state appellate court has shot down a former NFL linebacker’s suit alleging that Venable LLP mishandled his investment in a Floyd Mayweather Jr. boxing match, ruling Thursday that he lacked standing to sue because the firm never dealt with him but rather with a limited liability company that handled his money.

  • September 13, 2019

    SC Lawmakers To Follow Calif. With NCAA Athlete Pay Bill

    The ripple effect from California lawmakers approving a bill to allow college athletes to be paid for sponsorships is being felt on the East Coast as a pair of South Carolina state lawmakers say they plan to introduce a similar measure to challenge the NCAA's amateur college sports rules.

  • September 13, 2019

    Tennis Star Osaka Escapes Trainer's '20% Of Everything' Suit

    Tennis superstar Naomi Osaka has prevailed over a former coach suing her for 20% of everything she's worth after a Florida state judge said the contract in question was clearly unenforceable because Osaka was 15 when her father signed it.

  • September 13, 2019

    UFC, Fighters Trade Blows Ahead Of Class Cert. Decision

    The Ultimate Fighting Championship and fighters suing it over an anti-competitive “scheme” that allegedly keeps their earnings low have just traded some of the most important blows in the potentially multibillion-dollar case, with each side trying to knock out the other’s experts ahead of a class certification decision.

  • September 13, 2019

    Atty Can't Block Red Sox Purchase Of Street By Fenway Park

    A local attorney can't stop the Boston Redevelopment Authority from selling the Red Sox the permanent rights to a street next to the team's Fenway Park stadium, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court said Friday.

  • September 13, 2019

    Contractor Should Face Ex-NFLer's 'Dream House' Suit: Judge

    A Massachusetts federal judge has recommended that a contractor should not escape a former NFL player's suit alleging it infringed on his copyright after building his dream home, saying the record suggests the player still owned the rights to the house when the contractor moved to sell it.

  • September 13, 2019

    Felicity Huffman Gets 2 Weeks In Prison For 'Varsity Blues'

    A remorseful Felicity Huffman was sentenced to 14 days behind bars Friday for her guilty plea in the college admissions scandal by a Massachusetts federal judge who urged the "Desperate Housewives" star to "rebuild her life" after serving her time.

  • September 13, 2019

    USA Gymnastics Asks For 60 More Days To File Ch. 11 Plan

    USA Gymnastics has asked the Indiana bankruptcy court overseeing its restructuring for more time to file a Chapter 11 plan, saying it’s making progress in dealing with its insurers and the hundreds of sexual abuse claims that felled it.

  • September 13, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen a Russian state-owned bank drag the chairman of a former FIFA World Cup contractor to court, property developers sue Barclays over a swaps dispute and Kuwait's public pension hit its former director with a commercial fraud suit. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • September 13, 2019

    Bribe Amounts Won't Impact 'Varsity Blues' Parent Sentences

    Just hours before sentencing actress Felicity Huffman in the college admissions case dubbed “Varsity Blues,” a federal judge in Massachusetts on Friday rejected an argument by prosecutors that the amount of bribe money paid by parents connected to the scheme should be used to jack up their sentencing guideline range.

  • September 12, 2019

    Zion Williamson's Onetime Agent Seeks To Shut Down Suit

    The sports management company suing No. 1 NBA draft pick Zion Williamson for $100 million has moved to shut down the young basketball star’s own suit against it, arguing the North Carolina federal court Williamson sued in lacks jurisdiction because he was never a citizen of the state.

  • September 12, 2019

    No Prison For 'Crucial Witness' In NCAA Hoops Bribery Trials

    A key government witness in the National Collegiate Athletic Association corruption cases has dodged both prison time and probation, with a Manhattan federal judge on Thursday ruling he had provided an important service at trial.

  • September 12, 2019

    NHL Player's Widow Says CBA Doesn't Preempt Injury Claims

    The widow of NHL player Todd Ewen attempted to overcome a hurdle at the center of concussion and head injury lawsuits against the league Wednesday and urged a California federal court to reject the NHL's argument that its labor agreements cover her claims.

  • September 12, 2019

    Insurer Can't Seek Product Liability Deal Repayment In Wis.

    Lexington Insurance Co. can’t sue two Taiwanese insurance companies in Wisconsin seeking their reimbursement of a payout in the settlement of a product liability suit against a bicycle company because the court doesn’t have jurisdiction over them, the Seventh Circuit affirmed Thursday.

  • September 12, 2019

    Judge In Brock Turner Case Loses Girls' Tennis Coaching Gig

    Recalled California state judge Aaron Persky, who gained notoriety after sentencing Stanford swimmer Brock Turner to only six months in prison following his sexual assault conviction, has been fired from his high school girls' tennis coach job.

  • September 12, 2019

    One Insurer Settles With NFL In Concussion Coverage Dispute

    The NFL has settled with one insurer in a sprawling lawsuit in New York state court over who will pay for the concussion litigation that led to a landmark 2015 settlement expected to pay out more than $1 billion to retired players.

  • September 12, 2019

    US Women's Soccer Team Moves For Cert. In Pay Equity Suit

    The U.S. Soccer Federation's policies are a "textbook example" of gender discrimination, the women's national soccer team told a California federal judge Wednesday, saying the squad's pay equity suit can be resolved "in one fell swoop" and urging him to grant class certification for past, present and future players.

  • September 12, 2019

    Parents Lose Class Cert. Bid In Pop Warner Concussion Suit

    A California federal judge on Wednesday denied class certification to parents accusing Pop Warner of deceiving them about the risks of head injuries their children would face, saying they haven't shown that the organization told all parents the same things.

  • September 11, 2019

    LeBron Can't Get 'Taco Tuesday' Trademark Registration

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is refusing to grant NBA star LeBron James a trademark registration for “Taco Tuesday,” calling it a “commonplace term” that cannot be locked up by one person.

  • September 11, 2019

    Antonio Brown Suit Is Key Test For NFL's Conduct Policy

    A new civil lawsuit against New England Patriots wide receiver Antonio Brown alleging he sexually assaulted a personal trainer could put the NFL commissioner's power to discipline players to the test at a crucial moment as talks heat up over a new labor deal between the league and its players.

  • September 11, 2019

    United Sporting OK'd For $8.4M Ch. 11 Sale Of Ohio Property

    Bankrupt sporting goods and firearms distributor United Sporting Cos. received court approval Wednesday in Delaware for an $8.4 million sale of an Ohio distribution facility as it continues to liquidate it property as part of a proposed Chapter 11 plan.

  • September 11, 2019

    Ohio State, Marc Jacobs Both Refused 'The' TMs For Now

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is refusing for now to let either Ohio State University or Marc Jacobs register the word “The” as a trademark, ruling that neither has yet proven it actually uses the common term as a trademark.

  • September 11, 2019

    Canoe Race Host Asks 9th Circ. To Revive Coverage Battle

    The host of a 2016 canoe race hit with a suit by a racer who was seriously injured in a freak accident told the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday that a Hawaiian federal judge misread its policy with Great Divide Insurance Co. when she found the insurer didn’t have to defend it.

  • September 11, 2019

    Witness To Racer's $2B Tribal Loan Scam Avoids Prison

    A Missouri woman whose testimony helped convict racer Scott Tucker of operating a $2 billion tribal payday loan scam avoided prison Wednesday when a Manhattan federal judge credited her remorse and her value as a cooperating witness at Tucker's high-profile trial.

  • September 11, 2019

    Calif. Senate Backs Athlete Pay Bill Over NCAA Protest

    The California Senate unanimously approved a bill that would allow athletes to earn money from endorsements and sponsorships on Wednesday, as the NCAA urged Gov. Gavin Newsom not to sign off on the bill, saying it would overthrow the competitive balance among its member schools.

Expert Analysis

  • TM Rights Vs. Free Speech In Humvee Call Of Duty Case

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    The New York federal court case AM General v. Activision, involving use of the trademarked "Humvee" vehicle in a First-Amendment-protected video game, is set to have wide-ranging legal, creative and brand implications across a host of industries, says David Jacoby of Culhane Meadows.

  • State Net

    How Online Wagers Are Shaping States' Sports Betting Regs

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    Just over a year after the U.S. Supreme Court legalized sports betting nationwide, the industry is seeing an explosion of activity online, but the influence of entrenched gambling interests means that some states are only allowing bets to be placed in person at casinos and racetracks, says Dave Royse of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • The Factors Courts Consider In Deposition Location Disputes

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    In the absence of a federal rule governing deposition location, federal courts are frequently called on to resolve objections to out-of-state deposition notices. Recent decisions reveal what information is crucial to courts in making the determination, says Kevin O’Brien at Porter Wright.

  • Opinion

    NFL Discipline Process Shouldn't Apply To Off-Field Conduct

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    This week, the NFL opened an investigation into New England Patriots wide receiver Antonio Brown after he was accused of sexual assault in a Florida federal court case, but the NFL should get out of the business of discipline for off-field behavior — for five reasons, says Ronald Katz at GCA Law Partners.

  • What To Consider Before Filing For A Rule 57 Speedy Hearing

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    Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 57 and its state counterparts provide a method for expediting claims for declaratory judgment that warrants closer attention than it has historically received from litigants and courts, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Key US Tax Rules For Foreign Athletes And Entertainers

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    When Canadian Bianca Andreescu won the 2019 U.S. Open, she probably wasn’t thinking about how that affected her taxes, but it is increasingly critical for foreign athletes and entertainers to become educated regarding the United States’ taxation of their income, say Jason Dimopoulos and Thomas Linguanti at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Expanding The Meaning Of Diversity

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    My conservative, Catholic parents never skipped a beat when accepting that I was gay, and encouraged me to follow my dreams wherever they might lead. But I did not expect they would lead to the law, until I met an inspiring college professor, says James Holmes of Clyde & Co.

  • TM Law Obstacles To Challenging Cultural Appropriation

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    As recently demonstrated by the backlash to Kim Kardashian's controversial attempt to register "Kimono" as a trademark, groups seeking to counter potential appropriators of cultural indicia face a multitude of challenges in establishing ownership of a valid trademark and in attempting to oppose or cancel the appropriative marks, says Dariush Adli of Adli Law Group.

  • How The Wayback Machine Can Strengthen Your Case

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    The Wayback Machine, which archives screenshots of websites at particular points in time, can be an invaluable tool in litigation, but attorneys need to follow a few simple steps early in the discovery process to increase the odds of being able to use materials obtained from the archive, says Timothy Freeman of Tanenbaum Keale.

  • Worker Social Media Breaks May Raise Practical, Legal Issues

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    Similar to a workplace policy the Arizona Cardinals recently implemented, employers may want to provide workers with breaks for checking social media, but this type of arrangement could present challenges under the National Labor Relations Act and applicable laws governing employee break time, say Steve Miller and Franklin Wolf at Fisher Phillips.

  • Opinion

    Draft Civil Procedure Jurisdictional Rule Needs A Tweak

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    The Judicial Conference Advisory Committee’s proposed addition to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 7.1 needs to be amended slightly to prevent late-stage jurisdictional confusion in cases where the parties do not have attributed citizenship, says GianCarlo Canaparo at The Heritage Foundation.

  • Opinion

    Minor Leaguers' Class Cert. Win Won't Help Baseball Pay

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    A class of approximately 6,000 Minor League Baseball players was recently certified by the Ninth Circuit in a minimum wage case, which is a major victory for the players, but a glimmer in the otherwise dismal labor history and future of Minor League Baseball, says Ronald Katz at GCA Law.

  • New Best Practices Under E-Discovery Spoliation Rule

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    The amended Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 37(e) provides explicit criteria for imposing sanctions when electronically stored information has been lost during discovery, but courts are still not consistently applying the new rule, with some simply ignoring it in favor of inherent authority, say Matthew Hamilton and Donna Fisher at Pepper Hamilton.

  • Navigating The Mysterious NCAA Verbal Commitment

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    New NCAA recruiting legislation — created in response to growing concerns over early recruiting of prospective college student-athletes — means that the earliest possible date for a verbal offer and verbal acceptance is 12 a.m. on Sept. 1. Alex Buckley of Womble Bond provides a legal road map for high school student-athletes on how to treat a rescindable verbal commitment.

  • How Law Firms Can Create Content Decision Makers Will Read

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    According to our recent survey, the one simple attribute that attracts both in-house counsel and C-suite executives to content is utility, but it’s also clear that both groups define utility differently and prefer different content types, says John Corey of Greentarget.