Tax

  • June 24, 2022

    New Troutman CPA-Atty Partner A 'Major Plus' For Tax Group

    Troutman Pepper has added a dual-licensed attorney-CPA as a partner in its national tax and benefits practice group in New York, the firm announced.

  • June 24, 2022

    Rising Star: Cravath's Andrew T. Davis

    Andrew T. Davis of Cravath Swaine & Moore LLP has played a lead role in structuring billion-dollar acquisitions across the globe, including transactions involving companies based in Australia and the Netherlands, earning him a spot among the tax attorneys under age 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • June 24, 2022

    Supreme Court Overturns Roe v. Wade

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday upheld a Mississippi abortion ban and overturned the constitutional abortion right established nearly 50 years ago in Roe v. Wade, setting the stage for a widespread rollback of abortion rights in many statehouses around the country.

  • June 23, 2022

    Family Knew Of Trust Moves By Nelson Mullins Atty, Jury Told

    Counsel for a Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP estate planning attorney sued for malpractice by a wealthy Florida family grilled the family patriarch on Thursday, producing emails, meeting notes and documents showing the client knew and signed off on trusts and estate planning moves made by the attorney.

  • June 22, 2022

    Dr. Says Nelson Mullins Atty Knew Plan To Treat Kids Equally

    The patriarch of a wealthy Florida family suing its Nelson Mullins estate planning attorney took the stand Wednesday, telling jurors he took steps to minimize a windfall for one of his five children and made it clear to his attorney that he wanted to treat all of his children equally.

  • June 22, 2022

    Proposed Gas Tax Break Could Foil Infrastructure Upgrades

    President Joe Biden's call for Congress to suspend the federal gas tax may marginally blunt the pain that American consumers are feeling at the pump, but experts say it could also undermine recent efforts to boost funding for critical transportation infrastructure.

  • June 22, 2022

    Alleged VAT Fraud Ring Dodged $4.2M In Taxes, EU Says

    European authorities carried out 20 searches in four countries as part of an investigation into an alleged fraud outfit they believe evaded €4 million ($4.2 million) in value-added tax, a European Union agency said Wednesday.

  • June 22, 2022

    Seattle's 'Amazon Tax' Upheld By Wash. State Appeals Court

    Seattle's so-called Amazon tax, levied on the payroll expenses of large businesses within the city, is not unconstitutional, a Washington appeals court said, rejecting arguments that the tax targets the fundamental right to work for wages.

  • June 22, 2022

    Mass. Top Court Blesses 'Millionaires' Tax' Ballot Question

    The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court on Wednesday rejected a challenge to a ballot question on whether to impose a 4% tax on incomes over $1 million, allowing the issue to go to voters after an earlier version was struck down by a divided court.

  • June 21, 2022

    Expert Says Fla. Couple's Son Was Overpaid For CEO Work

    An executive compensation expert testified Tuesday that the son of a wealthy Florida couple was "excessively compensated" for the work he did as CEO of the company owned by his parents, who say their Nelson Mullins estate planning attorney mishandled trusts to heavily tip the scales in favor of the son over their other four children.

  • June 21, 2022

    Colorado High Court Says Family Leave Premium Not A Tax

    The Colorado Supreme Court threw out a challenge Tuesday to the state's paid family and medical leave program contending workers' payments slated to fund the program amounted to unconstitutional taxation, ruling the program was legal under state law.

  • June 21, 2022

    Once Avenatti Is Sentenced, Feds Plan To Drop Other Charges

    Now that Michael Avenatti has pled guilty to four counts of wire fraud and one of tax fraud without a plea deal, prosecutors told a California federal judge Tuesday that they plan to drop the remaining 31 charges against the disgraced attorney as soon as he is sentenced.

  • June 21, 2022

    Grant Thornton UK Adds Tax Specialist From HMRC

    Grant Thornton UK LLP added a former HM Revenue & Customs official as a tax risk management specialist who will support clients on tax governance, the firm announced.

  • June 21, 2022

    Hogan Lovells Silicon Valley Leader Jumps To Cleary

    Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP announced on Tuesday it is bringing the former leader of Hogan Lovells' Silicon Valley office on board as a partner in the mergers and acquisitions group in its recently opened San Francisco office.

  • June 21, 2022

    Justices To Weigh Foreign Account Tax Penalty Limits

    The U.S. Supreme Court decided Tuesday to hear a dispute over the maximum penalty for failing to disclose foreign bank accounts to the IRS in a case that could resolve the limits of a $10,000 penalty for undeclared accounts.

  • June 21, 2022

    Justices Decline To Review Nixing Of Texas Latex Club Fee

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Tuesday to hear Texas' claims that the Fifth Circuit lacked jurisdiction to strike down a charge imposed on clubs with liquid-latex-covered dancers because the charge was a tax instead of a fee.

  • June 17, 2022

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest US Law Firms

    As the legal market adjusted to pressures of a global pandemic and saw demand for complex legal services soar, many law firms spent 2021 locked in a fierce war for talent to meet ever-expanding client needs. 

  • June 17, 2022

    Will BigLaw Regret Its Hiring Spree As The Economy Softens?

    The largest 200 law firms in the U.S. boosted their headcount by an average of 5.6% in 2021 — the steepest increase in five years, according to the Law360 400. Here's a look at what those numbers mean and where firms may be headed if the economy slows in the coming year.

  • June 17, 2022

    Firm's Ethics Policies Aren't Final Say, Higher-Up Testifies

    A former managing partner who supervised a Nelson Mullins lawyer accused of mishandling trusts was grilled in trial testimony played Friday on whether his office's lawyers felt compelled to follow the firm's written policies regarding conflicts reporting, engagement letters and more, and described those policies as "words on a page."

  • June 17, 2022

    Texas Justices Deny $3M Premium Tax Refund To Blue Cross

    Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas is not entitled to a $3 million tax refund on its stop-loss insurance policies because those policies are considered health insurance under the law, the Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday.

  • June 17, 2022

    Fla. Woman Convicted In $3B Scheme To Defraud IRS

    A federal jury convicted a Florida woman Thursday of swindling the Internal Revenue Service out of nearly $6 million with a fake tax return scheme she and her husband carried out over a 10-year span that sought $3 billion in total refunds to fund a lavish lifestyle.

  • June 16, 2022

    Chevron Deference Still Feels Heat After High Court Reprieve

    The U.S. Supreme Court's landmark doctrine requiring judicial deference to federal regulators survived a major health care case at the high court Wednesday, but the controversial bedrock of administrative law barely escaped the conservative justices' frying pan and is heading right back into their fire, experts say.

  • June 16, 2022

    Nelson Mullins Atty's Work Was 'Conflict Ridden,' Jury Hears

    A legal ethics expert testified Thursday that a Nelson Mullins lawyer's work for a wealthy Florida family was rife with conflicts of interest, and a waiver letter he asked them to sign was an ethical minefield.

  • June 16, 2022

    7th Circ. Says Debt Owner Missed Chance For Eatery's Deed

    The Seventh Circuit determined on Thursday that a property tax lien purchaser has no claim to the deed of a bankrupt restaurant, saying it missed the opportunity to contest the cash payment promised in the owners' bankruptcy plan.

  • June 16, 2022

    Cushman Can't Halt NY AG's Subpoenas In Trump Probe

    Former Trump Organization appraisal firm Cushman & Wakefield must comply with subpoenas from New York's attorney general in her probe of former President Donald Trump's business dealings after a state appeals court declined to pause the requests Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Ways To Preserve Confidentiality Of Litigation Funding Docs

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    Though two recent rulings by Massachusetts and Illinois federal courts add to the growing body of case law denying discovery into litigation funding arrangements, prudence necessitates that lawyers, clients and funders follow certain best practices to ensure that their communications are not discoverable by opposing parties, says Stewart Ackerly at Statera Capital.

  • Rebuttal

    Remote Hearings Are Ill-Suited Default For Litigation Realities

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    A recent Law360 guest article suggests that remote proceedings should be the default in civil litigation even after the pandemic, but courts should continue to give parties the option to appear in person because it can actually save long-term costs, prepare younger attorneys more effectively, and bring a necessary degree of seriousness to hearings, says Mark​ Eisen at Benesch Friedlander.

  • Perspectives

    ABA's New Anti-Bias Curriculum Rule Is Insufficient

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    The American Bar Association's recently approved requirement that law schools educate students on bias, cross-cultural competency and racism, while a step in the right direction, fails to publicly acknowledge and commit to eradicating the systemic racial inequality in our legal system, says criminal defense attorney Donna Mulvihill Fehrmann.

  • Opinion

    Remote Hearings Should Be The Default In Civil Litigation

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    The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure impose an affirmative duty on courts to eliminate undue cost, so remote hearings should be the default in civil litigation even after the pandemic, while in-person hearings must justify their existence, says Joshua Sohn at the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • Attorneys Today Need To Depose Like There's No Tomorrow

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    With people leaving the workforce in droves amid the “Great Resignation” and with younger workers less inclined to stay in one place for long, attorneys need to adjust their deposition strategies to minimize risks of losing crucial witnesses who may move on from a client or opponent company before a case goes to trial, say Anthony Argiropoulos and Maximilian Cadmus at Epstein Becker.

  • How Attorneys Can Ethically Terminate A Client Relationship

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    As illustrated by Dentons’ recent request to withdraw from its representation of a casino mogul in Bartlit Beck v. Okada, terminating client relationships prematurely can be tricky and met with skepticism in the courts, but following certain best practices can make the process a little less painful for everyone involved, says Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight.

  • The Key To Turning Solid Briefs Into Winning Briefs

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    Even a well-written brief can omit key facts, make tone-deaf legal arguments or ignore practical implications, so lawyers drafting motions and appeals should incorporate feedback processes akin to moot courts and jury research, says Andrew Nichols at Charis Lex.

  • Walter Dellinger's Little-Known, Outsize Impact On Legal Aid

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    The late Walter Dellinger’s pro bono work distinguishes him forever, but his greatest moment involved a little-known U.S. Supreme Court case, Brown v. Legal Foundation of Washington, which helped preserve one of the largest sources of legal aid funding — and Dellinger’s arguments were as magical as the program he helped save, says David Lash at O'Melveny.

  • Why I'll Miss Arguing Before Justice Breyer

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    Carter Phillips at Sidley shares some of his fondest memories of retiring Justice Stephen Breyer both inside and out of the courtroom, and explains why he thinks the justice’s multipronged questions during U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments were everything an advocate could ask for.

  • Recent Rulings Show Lawyer Criticism Of Judges Is Perilous

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    Although many lawyers may believe the First Amendment broadly protects their opinions and good faith criticism of judges, recent sanctions decisions from courts across the country suggest lawyers are at greater risk of discipline for criticizing judges than they have been in the past, says John Harris at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • Breyer's Role In Courthouse Design Sets A Judicial Template

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    As U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer prepares to retire, his pivotal role two decades ago in the design of the award-winning John Joseph Moakley U.S. Courthouse in Boston demonstrates how the judiciary can engage in civic architecture and specifically the design of courthouses, says Kate Diamond at HDR.

  • BigLaw Must Nix All-Or-Nothing Work Model To Retain Talent

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    Record numbers of workers quitting in the “Great Resignation,” paired with the growing success of nontraditional and freelance legal services, show that BigLaw’s management committees must reconsider rigid billable hour expectations and be open to part-time and noncontinuous work arrangements, says Hui Chen at Hui Chen Ethics.

  • Opinion

    Biden's Supreme Court Nominee Should Have 5 Key Qualities

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    In fulfilling his campaign promise to nominate a Black woman to the U.S. Supreme Court, President Joe Biden should look for candidates with experience as a state trial judge, a background in public education and a few other important characteristics, says Benes Aldana, president of The National Judicial College.

  • How Justice Breyer Influenced State Tax Jurisprudence

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    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, who announced his retirement last week, leaves behind a series of notable decisions that will continue to shape state and local taxation, especially in the areas of the commerce and equal protection clauses, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • The Flaws In The Traditional Approach To Hiring A Law Firm

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    Trevor Faure at Smarter Law Solutions and Gregory Richter at Major Lindsey offer an inside look at Teva Pharmaceuticals' recent overhaul of its law firm relationships through anonymous grading, and discuss how the company’s surprising findings on the correlation between quality and cost reveal shortcomings in traditional business development.

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