Technology

  • January 21, 2022

    EFinancial Seizes On TCPA Safe Harbor To Shake Calling Suit

    A Washington federal judge has freed eFinancial from a putative class action over allegedly unlawful telemarketing calls after finding that the company had implemented policies that qualified it for a liability shield available under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, handing companies a promising new path to defeat increasingly popular Do Not Call Registry claims.

  • January 21, 2022

    Zurich Defeats Pandemic Coverage Suit Over IT Co.'s Losses

    A Texas federal judge on Friday sided with Zurich American Insurance Co. in yet another dispute over pandemic-related claim coverage, this time agreeing with the insurer that information technology services provider NTT Data International isn't entitled to coverage of its business interruption losses stemming from COVID-19.

  • January 21, 2022

    Uber Can't Use Lyft Win To Beat Wheelchair-Accessibility Trial

    Uber can't exit a bench trial over allegations it discriminates against people with disabilities by not providing wheelchair-accessible vehicles in two Southern cities, a California federal judge ruled on Friday, saying the case is distinguishable from a recent decision in favor of rival Lyft.

  • January 21, 2022

    Meta, Snap's 'Addictive' Platforms Blamed For Child's Suicide

    Meta Platforms and Snap Inc. peddle addictive social media platforms, like Facebook and Snapchat, that harm the mental health of children and teenagers, according to a federal lawsuit filed Thursday in California by a mother who claims the social media giants are responsible for her young daughter's death.

  • January 21, 2022

    Investor Claims Robinhood Concealed Downturn Before IPO

    Trading app Robinhood failed to tell investors that its revenues were dropping when it launched its $2.1 billion initial public offering last year, a shareholder has told a Delaware federal court.

  • January 21, 2022

    IPO Market Gets Off To A Rocky Start In 2022

    Initial public offerings are off to a bumpy start in 2022, evidenced by several delayed offerings and mixed performances among companies that have gone public amid choppy conditions, chilling the near-term outlook for IPO prospects.

  • January 21, 2022

    Online Broker Appeals Oregon's Win Over Real Estate Fees

    An online real estate brokerage has appealed to the Ninth Circuit to take up its challenge to Oregon regulations that prohibit brokers from paying rebates to buyers after they close on a home purchase.

  • January 21, 2022

    GAO Reignites $13.6M ICE Contract Over Employee History

    A government watchdog reignited U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's search to fill a $13.6 million information technology support task order for the student and exchange visitor program, after finding the awardee misled the agency about a manager's experience.

  • January 21, 2022

    Tillis Slams DOJ's Plan To Revise Policy On Essential Patents

    Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., the top Republican on the Senate's intellectual property subcommittee, criticized U.S. Department of Justice officials over a recent draft policy statement seeking to reverse a Trump-era policy that made it easier for holders of standard-essential patents to seek injunctive relief in court.

  • January 21, 2022

    NY Fiber Co. To Pay $5M Over 'Unsafe' Pole Attachments

    New York's utility regulator has reached a $5 million settlement with a fiber optic internet service provider in Rochester over alleged violations of utility pole attachment rules, a sum of money the state said will help to develop broadband in the region.

  • January 21, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: Adrian Builders, Sitex, Ryan

    Adrian Builders has reportedly sold a Miami retail property for $26 million, Sitex Group is said to have paid $30 million for a Brooklyn industrial property and Ryan Cos. is said to have sold a Miami warehouse for $34.69 million.

  • January 21, 2022

    Google Says States' Ad Antitrust Suit Stifles 'Market Forces'

    Google accused antitrust watchdogs of bridling the free market on Friday as the data giant asked a New York federal judge to dismiss the bulk of 17 attorneys generals' claims that it monopolizes online display advertising.

  • January 21, 2022

    Startup CEO Seeks To Shake SEC's $18M Crypto Fraud Claims

    A Massachusetts man accused of illegally selling $18 million in cryptocurrency tokens hit back against the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's allegations, saying the agency didn't show the tokens were securities.

  • January 21, 2022

    Biden Admin. Expands Definition Of STEM For Int'l Students

    The Biden administration has implemented a pair of changes aimed at making it easier for international students in the STEM field to stay and work in the U.S. after graduation by widening the net of careers that fall into the science, technology, engineering or mathematics category and making it easier for those people to qualify as "extraordinary" individuals.

  • January 21, 2022

    Fintech-Focused SPAC Leads IPO Trio Totaling $625M

    Three blank-check companies focused on the financial services, cyber and media industries began trading Friday after raising a collective $625 million in initial public offerings led by seven law firms including King & Spalding LLP and Proskauer Rose LLP.

  • January 21, 2022

    FCC Chair Says Agency Is Working On Spectrum Coordination

    Federal Communications Commission Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel told members of Congress that her agency is working to resolve a government watchdog's recommendations for ways the FCC can better coordinate on spectrum policy.

  • January 21, 2022

    Patent Suit Over Nook's Highlighter Is Trimmed

    A New York federal judge Thursday tossed one count from a California inventor's lawsuit accusing Barnes & Noble's Nook unit of infringing his patented digital highlighting technology, finding there wasn't enough similarity between the e-book's method for emphasizing text and the patent's described technique.

  • January 21, 2022

    Yandex Cuts Deal Ending Russian Self-Preferencing Case

    Amid debate among U.S. lawmakers over legislation that would bar large technology platforms from favoring their own products and services, Russia's antitrust watchdog has entered a settlement with internet giant Yandex requiring the company to end similar practices.

  • January 21, 2022

    FCC Looks To Ink Apartment Internet Choice Rule

    The Federal Communications Commission is getting the ball rolling on a measure to promote competition and increase choice for broadband services for people living and working in apartments.

  • January 21, 2022

    Google Can't Sink Audio Patent In Del. Suit

    Delaware's top federal judge on Friday turned down Google's effort to throw out claims in an audio programming patent that a controversial Texas patent-holding company has spent the last decade asserting against some of the biggest names in the tech and media industries.

  • January 21, 2022

    Virtual Events Co. Sues To Block Ex-Exec From Zoom Role

    Global virtual events and cloud communications venture Intrado Digital Media LLC has sued a former sales executive who jumped to Zoom Video Communications, seeking an injunction in Delaware Chancery Court barring the ex-employee from giving away trade secrets and proprietary market information.

  • January 21, 2022

    J2 Class Attys Get $2M For Saving $25M On Insider Deal

    Two firms representing digital media business J2 Global Inc. investors have nabbed $1.95 million in connection with a settlement ending a Delaware Chancery Court suit that challenged an investment contract worth millions made to a fund chaired by J2's chairman.

  • January 21, 2022

    Office Space Management Co. Lands $150M Vista Investment

    Office space management company OfficeSpace Software Inc. said Friday it landed a $150 million investment from Vista Equity Partners.

  • January 21, 2022

    Over Protests, Judge Lets IT Group Into H-1B Lottery Rule Suit

    A D.C. federal judge brushed off objections from both sides in a suit over the H-1B specialty occupation visa program's lottery-based applications to let the U.S.' largest information technology services association intervene in the case.

  • January 21, 2022

    Ex-Mass. Mayor Cites Omicron In 2nd Bid To Delay Prison

    Former Massachusetts Mayor Jasiel Correia on Friday asked a federal judge to delay the start of his six-year prison term for a corruption conviction, citing the omicron variant and the fact that his alleged co-conspirator has yet to be tried.

Expert Analysis

  • Germany's Google Controls Illustrate Global Antitrust Trend

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    Germany's recent move to rein in Google with extended restrictions on anti-competitive behavior provides an example of the new aggressive stance regulators around the world are adopting as tech giants grow their power in the digital economy, says Andrea Pomana at ADVANT Beiten.

  • What To Expect From Merger Guideline Modernization

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's and Federal Trade Commission's recent request for comment on amending the merger review guidelines provides perhaps the clearest indication yet of where guideline revisions might focus, including on structural presumptions, the role of market definition and the effect of transactions on labor, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • Reevaluating Organizations' Cybersecurity Needs After Log4j

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    A recently unearthed vulnerability in the popular Apache Log4j software is the latest cyber incident that shows the whack-a-mole response is not sufficient, but there are certain reorientation strategies that can effectively mitigate cybersecurity risk, say Colin Jennings and Ericka Johnson at Squire Patton and Michael McAndrews at PacketWatch.

  • The Rising Demand For Commercial Litigators In 2022

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    Amid broken supply chains, pandemic-induced bankruptcies and a rise in regulation by litigation, strong commercial litigators — strategists who are adept in trying a range of tortious and contractual disputes — are becoming a must-have for many law firms, making this year an opportune moment to make the career switch, say Michael Ascher and Kimberly Donlon at Major Lindsey.

  • Import Best Practices Under New Uyghur Forced Labor Law

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    Rachel Alpert and Grace Signorelli-Cassady at Jenner & Block discuss key provisions of the recently enacted Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, and offer compliance strategies that may position importers to demonstrate their supply chains are free from forced labor when the act's provisions presumptively barring many Chinese imports go into effect in June.

  • Antitrust's 1900s Nostalgia In The US And Beyond

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    President Joe Biden's appointees will continue to pursue a return to a previous antitrust era this year — the Federal Trade Commission, in particular, is dusting off its old tools — and similar developments are occurring in Europe and Asia, says Maureen Ohlhausen at Baker Botts.

  • 5 Global Digital Markets Regulatory Issues To Watch In 2022

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    Francesco Liberatore at Squire Patton lays out the key regulatory developments that will affect global digital markets this year, from new enforcement measures aimed at electronic communications services in the European Union to increased cooperation between antitrust officials in the U.S., U.K. and EU.

  • USPTO Pilot Program May Bring Welcome If Limited Efficiency

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    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's new Deferred Subject Matter Eligibility Response Pilot Program, in aiming to improve examination efficiency, should appeal to applicants, but its impact may be limited because it is invite-only and applies only to nonfinal office actions, says Kelvin Varghese at Haynes and Boone.

  • Opinion

    FTC Should Rethink Market Issues In Facebook Case

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    The Federal Trade Commission's antitrust prosecution of Meta Platforms, formerly Facebook, may have survived the initial litigation stage this week, but the case still does not embrace the markets it purports to fix, says David Reichenberg at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Takeaways From White Collar Criminal Enforcement In 2021

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    White collar criminal prosecutions were up in 2021, with recent high-profile fraud trials, the Biden administration's enforcement priorities and the continuing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic potentially reversing the previous trend of slumping white collar prosecutions, say attorneys at Keker Van Nest.

  • 5 Advertising Law Trends To Watch

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    For the world of advertising, 2022 will bring new compliance challenges and considerations shaped by legal developments in everything from nonfungible-token commerce in the metaverse to the ever-growing impact of social media on young users, say Jason Gordon and Deborah Bessner at Reed Smith.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Make The Case For Settling Early

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    Following the recent settlement in McDonald's v. Easterbrook, in-house counsel should consider decision-tree analyses and values-driven communications plans to secure effective, early resolutions in litigation, saving time and money and moving the company mission forward, say Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein and Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • New Anti-Dumping Rules Both Clarify And Complicate

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    The U.S. Department of Commerce's recent regulatory changes concerning anti-dumping and countervailing duty proceedings refine the process and helpfully eliminate steps for petitioners, but also create new hurdles for nonpetitioning parties, say William Isasi and Jordan Bakst at Covington.

  • To Retain Talent, GCs Should Prioritize Mission Statements

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    With greater legal demands and an increasing number of workers resigning during the pandemic, general counsel should take steps to articulate their teams' values in departmental mission statements, which will help them better prioritize corporate values and attract and retain talent, says Catherine Kemnitz at Axiom.

  • What Attys Can Learn From Harvard Professor's Conviction

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    The recent conviction of Harvard professor Charles Lieber, on charges of lying about ties to China, highlights the perils that even highly educated white collar targets face in an FBI interview without counsel present, and it provides urgent lessons for attorneys on guiding their clients through stressful circumstances, say Jack Sharman and Tatum Jackson at Lightfoot Franklin.

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