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Technology

  • February 19, 2019

    Justices Take Hard Look At AIA Challenges By Gov't Agencies

    Both sides in a U.S. Supreme Court case over whether the government can file America Invents Act patent challenges faced tough questions Tuesday, as some justices questioned the fairness of barring federal agencies from the system and others worried the “deck is stacked” against patents the government targets.

  • February 19, 2019

    NIST Cybersecurity Framework Still Going Strong 5 Years On

    A government-created cybersecurity framework has morphed into an unofficial liability shield for a broad range of private industries, and it promises to continue to be influential as the push to develop more formal security standards intensifies, attorneys say.

  • February 19, 2019

    Ericsson's Licensing Offer To HTC Is FRAND, Texas Jury Finds

    A Texas federal jury on Friday rejected HTC’s allegation that Ericsson is trying to overcharge on licensing fees for its standard-essential cellular patents, finding that the Swedish telecom giant’s offer to HTC is fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory and that both companies failed to negotiate in good faith.

  • February 19, 2019

    Yelp Rejects Paralegal's Claim It Dominates Google Searches

    Yelp asked a California federal court Tuesday to toss a paralegal's antitrust and racial discrimination suit accusing it of monopolizing Google's search results and refusing him equal treatment, arguing it has no control over Google results and doesn't make business contracts that favor "non-African-American individuals."

  • February 19, 2019

    High Court Roundup: Cert. Denials; EFF To File Amicus Brief

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday turned down appeals in several patent cases, including one by a Schlumberger Ltd. unit to revive its oil exploration patents that were at issue in another high court case over patent damages, while allowing the Electronic Frontier Foundation to file an amicus brief in a case asking if the government is a "person" that can challenge patents in America Invents Act reviews.

  • February 19, 2019

    Ethics Questions Prompt Halt Of JEDI Deal Protest

    A Court of Federal Claims judge on Tuesday stayed Oracle's protest over the U.S. Department of Defense's $10 billion JEDI cloud contract, giving the DOD time to look deeper into whether alleged conflicts of interest involving former departmental staff have tainted the deal.

  • February 19, 2019

    Xitronix Patent Antitrust Row Not Welcome At 5th Circ. Either

    Xitronix’s antitrust suit alleging patent fraud against KLA-Tencor is going back to the Federal Circuit, which previously rejected the case, after a Fifth Circuit panel said in a published opinion that the case can plausibly be heard only by the appeals court with exclusive jurisdiction over patent issues.

  • February 19, 2019

    Broadcasters Warn Against Sharing On 6 GHz Band

    The National Association of Broadcasters on Tuesday joined other groups in telling the Federal Communications Commission that it should be cautious about opening up the 6-gigahertz band, which is set aside for broadcast and satellite transmissions, to shared uses by unlicensed devices.

  • February 19, 2019

    Facebook Manager Used Racial Slurs, Worker Tells 4th Circ.

    A black Facebook facilities worker urged the Fourth Circuit to revive his suit accusing the social media giant of denying him a promotion because of his race, arguing there was undisputed evidence his ex-boss frequently used racial epithets.

  • February 19, 2019

    Wells Fargo Should Pay More After Tech Glitch, Couple Say

    A Washington state couple who lost their home to foreclosure has alleged that Wells Fargo failed to adequately compensate them for improperly denying their application for a mortgage modification after hundreds of applications had been denied due to a software glitch.

  • February 19, 2019

    Ex-CEO Accused Of Bilking Western NY Health Referral Co.

    The former CEO of eHealth Global Technologies has been charged with fraud by federal prosecutors in Rochester, New York, who accuse him of using a recruiting outfit purportedly owned by his wife to bill his former company $455,000 and take a cut of the proceeds, according to a Tuesday release.

  • February 19, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: Denel, Just, WeDoctor

    Denel is reportedly considering selling stakes in some of its divisions in an effort to once again be profitable, Just Inc. wants to raise roughly $200 million in its latest funding round, and WeDoctor is mulling listing a spinoff on a new technology-focused board at the Shanghai Stock Exchange.

  • February 19, 2019

    FCC's Draft Broadband Report OKs Industry Progress

    The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission circulated a draft report on Tuesday that concludes internet service is being reasonably and quickly rolled out nationwide, and while commissioners must still vote to approve the findings, it's already drawing some criticism.

  • February 19, 2019

    NZ Crafting Digital Tax Measures To Raise Up To $55M

    New Zealand is planning to have a tax designed to capture digital commerce and raise up to NZ$80 million ($55 million), jumping ahead of an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development project to devise recommendations for those issues by 2020.

  • February 19, 2019

    Don't Expand Broadcast Viewer Discount, Group Tells FCC

    Advocacy group Common Cause expressed outrage on Tuesday at suggestions that a break on the Federal Communications Commission’s national audience cap should extend to all TV stations, calling the move a “blatant ... land grab” that would expand rather than diminish a regulatory loophole.

  • February 19, 2019

    Synopsys Says Software Security Co. Abused Its License

    Synopsys Inc., which makes software for testing and designing computer chips, accused Fortinet Inc., a security software company, in California federal court of routinely skirting its software access licensing agreement to gain unauthorized access to Synopsys services.

  • February 19, 2019

    Cyber Co. Palo Alto Buys Security Automation Biz For $560M

    Cybersecurity company Palo Alto Networks said on Tuesday that it has agreed to buy Demisto, which specializes in security orchestration, automation and response, for $560 million as the company looks to build out its immediate threat prevention and response systems.

  • February 19, 2019

    Legal Services Provider Axiom Confidentially Files IPO

    Alternative legal services provider Axiom Global Inc. said Tuesday it confidentially filed a draft registration statement for an initial public offering with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, a move that follows the company’s recent spinoff of two business units.

  • February 19, 2019

    US Trade Group Warns Against Europewide 5G Standards

    U.S. wireless trade association CTIA distanced itself from a global trade group's call for a Europewide testing regime on 5G network equipment, arguing that a secure supply chain for next-generation networks is a global issue, and competition would suffer if that chain is governed inconsistently.

  • February 19, 2019

    Chamber, Uber Fight To Invalidate Seattle Driver Union Law

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and an Uber subsidiary have asked a Washington federal judge to invalidate Seattle's ordinance letting ride hailing app-based drivers unionize, saying the city’s law blatantly violates federal antitrust law by allowing independent contractors to band together and fix prices.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    The Problem With 'Optimal' Diversity

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    Organizations should seek to avoid discrimination, but they should also be wary of the idea that diverse teams function better than nondiverse teams, because this reasoning lacks evidence and can lead to a slippery slope, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research LLC.

  • State Net

    States May Take The Lead On Regulating AI

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    While artificial intelligence promises to revolutionize the way we live and work, there has been relatively little government regulation targeting it specifically. But legislation referring to AI is currently pending in at least 13 states, and more may be on the way, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Austin's Blockchain For The Homeless Faces Challenges

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    The city of Austin, Texas, has proposed a program using blockchain technology to connect homeless residents with their health and identity records. Creating the infrastructure for the project will not be difficult, but key questions include whether the homeless will participate and how they can access their information, says Edward Block of Foley & Lardner LLP.

  • 5 Considerations For Both Sides In Stadium Naming Deals

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    The stadium and arena naming rights deal market remains highly active. The complexity of these agreements and the importance of the terms are growing, say Ryan Davis and Steve Smith of Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP.

  • Recent Trends In FTC Consumer Protection Enforcement

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    The Federal Trade Commission is focusing its enforcement efforts on financial services, web services and emerging technologies, data security and consumer privacy, telecommunications, and health care — these five areas represented 88 percent of consumer protection actions in 2017 and 2018, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Fresh Takes On Seeking Costs And Fees Under Rule 45

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    Recent case law reveals that courts vary widely in their approaches to shifting the costs and fees incurred in responding to a Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 45 subpoena. Nonparties responding to such requests should consider certain district court trends, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Smith Camp Reviews 'Echo Of Its Time'

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    "Echo of Its Time" is the story of Nebraska’s federal district court from statehood in 1867 to the demise of Prohibition in 1933. Professors John Wunder and Mark Scherer have written an objective, unsentimental and insightful history, layered with context and rich in character study, says U.S. District Judge Laurie Smith Camp of the District of Nebraska.

  • ADEA Protections For Outside Applicants Still Up In The Air

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    While the Seventh Circuit's recent decision in Kleber v. CareFusion is a victory for employers, the issue of whether the Age Discrimination in Employment Act permits outside job applicants to bring disparate impact claims is far from settled, as other circuits have yet to weigh in, say Jill Lashay and Curtis Schaffner of Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC.

  • Driverless Car Bill Stalls In Congress, So States Gear Up

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    The 115th Congress failed to pass legislation regulating autonomous vehicles, and it is unlikely that the U.S. Department of Transportation will restrict AV development under the Trump administration, so more regulation will occur at the state level, say Bethany Gullman of Faegre Baker Daniels and Theodore Bristol of Faegre Baker Daniels Consulting.

  • The Role Of Data Analytics In Mass Torts

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    Lawyers involved in a mass tort must make difficult decisions concerning the potential size of the claimant pool, the expected percentage of qualifying cases, the likelihood of a settlement and more. Data analytics can help guide mass tort strategies and yield better outcomes, say Deb Zonies and Mark Zabel of litigation support services provider Verus LLC.