Technology

  • August 10, 2020

    Facebook Builds Group Focused On All Its Payment Initiatives

    Facebook is putting all of its payment initiatives under one roof with the creation of a group called Facebook Financial, or F2, headed by David Marcus, who oversees the Facebook-affiliated digital currency Libra, the social media giant confirmed Monday.

  • August 10, 2020

    Roku's Trial Delay Request OK'd By 'Surprised' Texas Judge

    U.S. District Judge Alan D. Albright on Monday again delayed a patent jury trial involving Roku because of the coronavirus pandemic, noting his surprise this time that Roku's attorneys had asked for the case to start in October because of persistent safety concerns.

  • August 10, 2020

    SEC Reaches Settlement With Accused COVID-19 Fraudster

    A Florida federal judge on Monday approved a consent judgment against a CEO accused by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission of inflating his company's share prices through misleading claims about fever-detecting thermal scanners, with the executive agreeing to a permanent ban from running issuers of securities and an undetermined civil fine.

  • August 10, 2020

    Kingston Can't Slash $7.5M Jury Verdict In USB Patent Case

    A California federal judge has rejected challenges related to a jury's finding that Kingston Technology Co. Inc.'s USB flash memory device with a "swiveling" cover infringed a patent owned by Pavo Solutions LLC and declined to slash the jury's $7.5 million award.

  • August 10, 2020

    EU, US In Talks To Replace Axed Privacy Shield Data Pact

    The U.S. Department of Commerce and the European Commission revealed Monday that they're negotiating an "enhanced" Privacy Shield data transfer agreement to replace a version of the popular pact invalidated by the European Court of Justice last month. 

  • August 10, 2020

    Payment Co. Settles Trade Secrets Suit With Ex-Workers

    A payment processing company let several former employees off the hook in California federal court after reaching a "confidential" settlement in its suit accusing them of helping its former CEO steal trade secrets and form a competing payment processing business.

  • August 10, 2020

    Pandemic Prompts 2-Month Delay In Apple, VirnetX Rematch

    Citing the ongoing spread of the coronavirus in Texas, a federal judge ordered a two-month delay Monday in VirnetX's hotly anticipated retrial against Apple over two patents related to the program VPN On Demand.

  • August 10, 2020

    Gov't Loses Early Alice Bid To Toss Data Processing IP Suit

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims has refused to dismiss a suit from E-Numerate Solutions Inc. alleging the government infringed seven data processing patents, finding it can survive for now because at least one claim of one patent passes muster under Alice.

  • August 10, 2020

    Confusion Prevails Over Extent Of Trump's TikTok 'Ban'

    President Donald Trump's efforts to "ban" TikTok using legal tools that aren't usually aimed at popular mobile apps have left attorneys confused about how exactly the social media platform will be targeted as U.S.-China relations continue to fray.

  • August 10, 2020

    Gunderson Guides Online Learning Biz's $66M In Financing

    Online learning platform Skillshare said Monday it raised $66 million from an investor group led by OMERS Growth Equity that the Gunderson Dettmer-steered company will use to spur international and domestic growth.

  • August 10, 2020

    Winners Of Contracts Worth $7.5B Keep Defense Project

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has rejected a California-based software company's challenge to a defense contract, finding that the Defense Department reasonably awarded it to winners of spots in its $7.5 billion Systems, Engineering, Technology and Innovation, or SETI, program.

  • August 10, 2020

    Google Slams Parents' Suit Over 'Loot Boxes' In Games

    Google on Friday urged a California federal court to throw out a suit brought by parents claiming its Google Play store encourages children to gamble via surprise in-game purchases called "loot boxes," arguing that it's immune from the claims because Google isn't the one behind the games or the loot boxes.

  • August 10, 2020

    Law Firm's 'Feeble' Efforts To Blame Over Pared-Down Suit

    A federal judge won't rethink his decision to pare down a law firm's suit against a suburban Chicago rival, blasting the firm for its "feeble prosecution" of allegations that the rival mimicked its website to confuse and steal potential clients.

  • August 10, 2020

    Thompson Hine Adds Pair Of Investment Management Attys

    Thompson Hine LLP said Monday it added two attorneys to its corporate transactions and securities practice group from in-house positions to focus on financial technology, broker-dealer regulations and fund governance.

  • August 10, 2020

    Google Asks 11th Circ. To Uphold Win In Pulse Shooting Suit

    Google urged the Eleventh Circuit on Monday to affirm the company's win in a suit blaming Facebook, Twitter and YouTube for radicalizing the man who carried out the 2016 mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Florida, saying a "virtually identical" suit was tossed by the Sixth Circuit.

  • August 10, 2020

    Pandemic Disrupts Georgia Voters' Bid For Paper Ballots

    A group of Georgia voters and election advocates lost their bid to have the state's electronic voting system replaced with paper ballots for a third time Friday, when a federal judge ruled they relied on information rendered obsolete by the coronavirus pandemic.

  • August 10, 2020

    Apple Says Koss' Headphone IP Suit Breaches Confidentiality

    After being sued last month by headphone maker Koss Corp. for allegedly infringing its patents for the "first-ever true wireless headphones" technology, Apple shot back with a declaratory judgment suit in California on Friday, saying Koss' complaint breaches a confidentiality agreement and is otherwise without merit.

  • August 10, 2020

    FCC Urged To Extend Low-Income COVID-19 Benefits

    An array of organizations advocating for civil, anti-poverty, consumer, labor and technology rights sent a letter Monday to the Federal Communications Commission urging the agency to further assist low-income consumers with staying connected as the coronavirus pandemic lingers.

  • August 10, 2020

    Settling Eventbrite Investors Say Virus Hurts Recovery Odds

    Eventbrite investors told a California federal judge they reached a $1.9 million settlement deal with the digital event management company, saying it seemed prudent to end their securities fraud suit amid a pandemic that makes large-scale, in-person events dangerous to hold.

  • August 10, 2020

    5th Circ. Backs Win For Energy Tech Firm In Trade Secret Row

    The Fifth Circuit has affirmed a lower court ruling that Petroleum Analyzer Co. LP hadn't wrongly used proprietary oil and gas technology developed by a competitor, saying there's no evidence the company swiped a trade secret.

  • August 10, 2020

    Physicist Says AI Inventor Ban Alters Patentability Criteria

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office improperly added a new requirement for patentability when it said an artificial intelligence machine cannot be named as an inventor, according to a new suit filed by the machine's developer.

  • August 10, 2020

    White House Announces Next Midband Spectrum Auction

    The Trump administration plans to auction off a fresh swath of valuable mid-band spectrum for commercial 5G services, the White House said Monday, after the U.S. military hammered out a public-private sharing regime.

  • August 10, 2020

    Chinese Gaming Cos. May Merge Amid US-China Tension

    China's Tencent on Monday detailed plans to further grow its stake in Huya through an $810 million deal as it weighs merging the U.S.-listed company with fellow gaming-focused streaming platform Douyu, a move that comes amid heightened tensions between the U.S. and China.

  • August 10, 2020

    Tech Giants, AGs Say Trump's Visa Bans Hurt US Economy

    Dozens of states and technology giants, including Apple Inc. and Microsoft Corp., have backed lawsuits challenging President Donald Trump's recent visa suspensions, arguing the president's orders will hinder the U.S.' economic recovery.

  • August 10, 2020

    NJ Justices Say Cops Can Force Cellphone Access

    A split New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Monday that law enforcement may compel the cellphone passcodes of a former sheriff's officer accused of tipping off a suspect in a drug trafficking investigation, reasoning that such information isn't shielded by constitutional protections against self-incrimination.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    ADA Protects Lawyers With Disabilities, But We Must Do More

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    As an attorney with cerebral palsy, Danielle Liebl at Reed Smith says that while the 30-year-old Americans with Disabilities Act has protected her against discrimination, the legal industry must do more to accommodate lawyers with disabilities and make them more comfortable in self-identifying.

  • Perspectives

    Legal Deserts Threaten Justice In Rural America

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    Many small towns and rural counties have few lawyers or none at all, which threatens the notion of justice for all Americans and demands creative solutions from legislators, bar associations and law schools, says Patricia Refo, president of the American Bar Association.

  • Unusual TikTok Review Calls CFIUS Processes Into Question

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    The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States has departed from established processes in its national security investigation of TikTok, with comments from across the Trump administration casting doubt on the interagency committee's confidentiality, apolitical nature and focus, says Paul Marquardt at Cleary.

  • Timing IPRs To Avoid Discretionary Denial Or Damages

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    For patent defendants determining how long they can wait to file parallel inter partes reviews to avoid discretionary denial under the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's recent Apple v. Fintiv ruling, a data-driven approach using recent district court and U.S. International Trade Commission timelines can provide guidance, say Syed Fareed and John Williams at Baker Botts.

  • CFAA Decision May Raise Bar On Scraping Liability

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    A D.C. federal court recently held in Sandvig v. Barr that the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act does not prohibit scraping publicly accessible portions of a website, even when doing so violates the website's terms of service, which is similar to the Ninth Circuit's 2019 hiQ v. LinkedIn decision and may influence scraping law in the coming years, say attorneys at ​​​​Perkins Coie.

  • Using Blockchain To Settle Trades Could Alter Litigation

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    On the heels of Paxos Trust's and the Depository Trust Clearing Corp.’s recent interest in using distributed ledger technology to settle equities trades, analysts at The Brattle Group explore how having a record of every transaction can help answer a thorny damages question in securities class actions.

  • Analyzing Upward And Downward Trends In Legal Tech

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    Advances in legal technology are often accompanied by bombastic overstatements, but it is important to separate the wheat from the chaff by looking at where various technologies stand on the hype curve, says Lance Eliot at Stanford Law School.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Availability, Removal, Entity Confusion

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, James Tucker at MoFo looks at three recent Government Accountability Office decisions considering an offeror's obligation to report the preaward unavailability of key personnel, grounds for removal from the Small Business Administration's disadvantaged businesses program and the importance of determining what "the offeror" means in each solicitation.

  • What You Missed At PTAB: Contours Of IPR Institution Denial

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    Recent Patent Trial and Appeal Board decisions illustrate the factual circumstances that the board finds compelling when exercising its discretion to deny institution of inter partes review based on copending district court litigation, with practical takeaways for petitioners and patent owners, say Andrew Holtman and Melissa Gibson at Akin Gump.

  • Opinion

    ABA's New Guidance On Litigation Funding Misses The Mark

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    The American Bar Association should revise its recently approved best practices on third-party litigation funding as they do not reflect how legal finance actually works and could create confusion among lawyers, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • 3 Cases Spotlight Shareholder Interest In Public Co. Diversity

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    Recent derivative claims filed in a California federal court over diversity and inclusion shortcomings at Oracle, Facebook and Qualcomm demonstrate shareholder willingness to hold directors and officers accountable for public companies' failure to deliver on environmental, social and governance commitments, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Regulatory Concerns For US Cos.' Offshore Service Centers

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    As more U.S. companies open and use offshore service-delivery centers amid the pandemic, assessment of important tax, intellectual property, cybersecurity and employment considerations can help mitigate regulatory risk and maximize the company's return on investment, says Sonia Baldia at Baker McKenzie.

  • New IT Restrictions For Gov't Contractors Bring M&A Hurdles

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    Prohibitions taking effect next week on the use of certain Chinese telecommunications technology by government contractors will have an immediate impact on M&A involving companies that do business with the federal government, and will require prospective buyers' careful consideration in four areas, say attorneys at Covington.

  • What Firms Should Ask Before Hiring Attorneys From Gov't

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    In the final year of any presidential administration, there is an undeniable appetite on the part of large law firms for government-savvy legal talent, but firms need to first consider how they will actually utilize their new star hire, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • The Ethics Of Using Chatbots For Legal Services

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    Delegating legal work to robots involves several risks, including running afoul of statutes dictating unauthorized practice of law, but with the right precautions, law firms can lawfully employ artificially intelligent chatbots that can imitate human conversations, say attorneys at Haynes and Boone.

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