Transportation

  • June 07, 2024

    Parking Lot Tech Co. Wants Rival To Hit The Brakes

    A Texas company that develops parking enforcement technology is suing a competitor in Colorado federal court, claiming the rival is infringing three of its patents that cover the use of a camera to track vehicles entering and exiting lots, automated fees, and ticketing. 

  • June 07, 2024

    Tesla Rips 'Unprecedented' $5.6B Fee Bid In Musk Pay Fight

    Tesla urged Delaware's Chancery Court on Friday to reject a $5.6 billion stock-based fee request by counsel representing investors who blocked Elon Musk's record Tesla pay package, arguing the "unprecedented" fee bid is unreasonable, unwarranted and 17 times larger than any fee award in Delaware history.

  • June 07, 2024

    US Auto Regulator Finalizes New Fuel Economy Standards

    The U.S. Department of Transportation on Friday finalized highly anticipated new fuel economy standards for passenger cars and light trucks that envision boosting average efficiency to 50.4 miles per gallon by 2031, marking the Biden administration's latest climate-focused endeavor to curb emissions in the transportation sector.

  • June 07, 2024

    FCA, Cummins' $6M Engine Defect Deal Gets OK'd

    A Michigan federal judge gave the go-ahead Friday to a $6 million settlement to resolve claims that Cummins Inc. made defective engines that went into FCA US LLC's Dodge Ram vehicles. FCA, now part of Stellantis NV, was once better known as Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV.

  • June 07, 2024

    Cherokee Man Asks High Court To Undo Tribal Tag Charges

    A Cherokee Nation man is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a Michigan Supreme Court order that denied him the chance to appeal his traffic stop convictions, arguing that the state must be barred from broadening the definition of "registration plate" in regard to tribal-licensed tags.

  • June 07, 2024

    Vehicle Repair Co. Gets New Shot At Hiring H-2B Mechanic

    A maintenance and vehicle repair company will have another chance to apply for an H-2B certification for a diesel mechanic, a U.S. Department of Labor appeals board ruled, saying that a certifying officer arbitrarily anticipated the deadline for submission.

  • June 07, 2024

    States Urge DC Circ. To Smoke EPA Particulate Matter Rule

    A coalition of 25 Republican-led states and eight industry groups have urged the D.C. Circuit to strike down the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's final rule tightening federal standards for fine particulate matter pollution in separate opening briefs.

  • June 07, 2024

    Uber Can Arbitrate With Paralyzed Rider, Mass. Justices Rule

    Massachusetts' highest court on Friday ruled Uber Technologies Inc. had made its terms of service clear enough to move a paralyzed rider's case to arbitration, despite a dissent from one justice who said the company should spell out the rights that riders surrender when they hail a car.

  • June 07, 2024

    Southwest Attys Get Pause On 'Punitive' Religious Training

    In finding Friday that an order for several in-house Southwest Airlines attorneys to undergo "religious liberty training" should be permanently placed on hold while an appeal of a flight attendant's Title VII trial win is pending, the Fifth Circuit said the district court had likely exceeded "the scope of the court's civil-contempt authority."

  • June 07, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen British broadcaster GB News hit with a libel claim by climate activist Dale Vince, MGM take aim at an immersive events company over intellectual property rights to the James Bond franchise, and law firms Stephenson Harwood and Bowen-Morris & Partners tackle a contracts claim by investment adviser Yieldstreet. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 06, 2024

    Tesla Sued Over Vote On Revived $55B CEO Pay, Texas Move

    Tesla, its board of directors and CEO Elon Musk were hit with a proposed class action in Delaware Chancery Court on Thursday over the company's plan to seek stockholder approval for the same $55.8 billion Musk compensation plan voided in January, along with reincorporation of Tesla as a Texas company.

  • June 06, 2024

    Texas AG Takes Aim At Carmakers Selling Drivers' Data

    Texas' attorney general has become the latest to turn up the data-privacy heat on connected car manufacturers, revealing Thursday that his office has begun an investigation into how these companies amass and sell drivers' data to third parties, including insurance providers.

  • June 06, 2024

    11th Circ. Won't Revive State Farm Auto Policy Coverage Fight

    The Eleventh Circuit affirmed Thursday the dismissal of a State Farm auto policyholder's proposed class action alleging the insurer breaches its own policies by routinely denying medical expense coverage based on an ambiguous "reasonableness" standard, finding that the policyholder's interpretation of the policy would render parts of it "meaningless."

  • June 06, 2024

    NTSB Pins Jets' Near Miss On Fog In Austin, Controller Errors

    Dense fog, the absence of critical runway safety technology and an air traffic controller's incorrect assumptions contributed to the February 2023 near-collision of a FedEx cargo plane and a Southwest Airlines passenger jet in Austin, Texas, the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday.

  • June 06, 2024

    Alaska Air Passengers Refile Suit Over Boeing Blowout

    A group of passengers who were on an Alaska Airlines Inc. flight when a door plug blew out during a Jan. 5 flight have refiled their claims against the airline, Boeing Co. and Spirit AeroSystems Inc. in federal court — days after voluntarily dismissing their state court suit.

  • June 06, 2024

    Transport Monopoly Indictment Is Deficient, Accused Says

    One of 12 individuals who U.S. federal prosecutors claim conspired to monopolize cross-border sales of used vehicles and other goods from the U.S. to Central America using violence has moved to dismiss antitrust charges, saying prosecutors omitted elements of an indictable offense.

  • June 06, 2024

    Ga. Panel Frees Railroad From Negligent Spotting Claim

    The Georgia Court of Appeals on Thursday said a trial court wrongly refused to free CSX Corp. and CSX Transportation Inc. from a so-called negligent spotting claim in a man's lawsuit alleging he was injured while moving a CSXT railcar as part of his work for a wood products company.

  • June 06, 2024

    UK, US Team Up On Standard-Essential Patents

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and U.K. Intellectual Property Office each announced a five-year agreement Thursday to collaborate on policy for standard-essential patents.

  • June 06, 2024

    Mass. AG Asks State High Court To Affirm Housing Law

    Massachusetts Attorney General Andrea Joy Campbell told the state's highest court this week that her office has the authority to seek enforcement of what she says is a mandatory state housing initiative requiring more than half the state's communities to allow multifamily housing development.

  • June 06, 2024

    5th Circ. Sides With Miss. In Pipeline Permitting Row

    The Fifth Circuit has found a lower court properly threw out an interstate pipeline company's assertion that annual levee crossing fees sought by Mississippi regulators were unconstitutional because they fell outside the scope of the company's 75-year-old permit.

  • June 06, 2024

    Mich. Court Promises Swift Ruling In Ford Battery-Plant Case

    A Michigan appellate court panel on Thursday said it would deliver its decision soon on a ballot measure aimed at halting the construction of a Ford Motor Co. megafactory, as campaigners pressed the court to rule ahead of fall election deadlines.  

  • June 06, 2024

    5 Firms Steer Pair Of Cross-Border IPOs Totaling $230M

    Australian-listed location app Life360 Inc. and Israeli nanotechnology startup Gauzy Ltd. began trading on Thursday after pricing two cross-border initial public offerings that raised a combined $230 million, steered by five law firms.

  • June 05, 2024

    Nissan Driver's Injuries Came From Head Strike, Surgeon Says

    A Nevada neurosurgeon told a jury Wednesday that the neck injuries he saw on a Nissan driver whose airbags allegedly misdeployed were "objectively" caused by a strong force against the forehead, despite a radiologist's differing opinion.

  • June 05, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Review Cathay Pacific Ticket Refund Fight

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday refused to reconsider its decision ordering a couple who were left stranded in the Philippines during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic to arbitrate their breach of contract dispute with Cathay Pacific Airways under their contract with a third-party booking site.

  • June 05, 2024

    Mich. Justices Say Train Co. Must Face Jury In Collision Case

    Michigan's top court said Grand Trunk Western Railroad Co. may be liable for a train's collision with a teenager who was walking on the tracks wearing headphones, finding a reasonable jury could conclude the conductors did not do enough to avoid hitting the boy.

Expert Analysis

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Nonprecedential, Unreasonable, Scope

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    James Tucker at MoFo examines three recent decisions showing that while the results of past competitions may inform bid strategy, they are not determinative; that an agency's award may be deemed unreasonable if it ignores available information; and that a protester may be right about an awardee's noncompliance but still lose.

  • Fears About The End Of Chevron Deference Are Overblown

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    While some are concerned about repercussions if the U.S. Supreme Court brings an end to Chevron deference in the Loper and Relentless cases this term, agencies and attorneys would survive just fine under the doctrines that have already begun to replace it, say Daniel Wolff and Henry Leung at Crowell & Moring.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • What To Know About IRS' New Jet Use Audit Campaign

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    The Internal Revenue Service recently announced plans to open several dozen audits scrutinizing executive use of company jets, so companies should be prepared to show the business reasons for travel, and how items like imputed income and deduction disallowance were calculated, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Ruling In La. May Undercut EPA Enviro Justice Efforts

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    A Louisiana federal court's recent decision in Louisiana v. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will likely serve as a template for other states to oppose the EPA's use of disparate impact analyses in Title VI civil rights cases aimed at advancing environmental justice policies and investigations, say Jonathan Brightbill and Joshua Brown at Winston & Strawn.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Where 9th Circ. Lowe's Ruling Leaves PAGA Jurisprudence

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    Leah Kennedy and Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks discuss the legal landscape and controlling precedent around the Private Attorneys General Act that led to the Ninth Circuit's Johnson v. Lowe's decision last month on individual PAGA wage claims, and explore the open questions that it leaves.

  • Opinion

    Proposed MDL Management Rule Needs Refining

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    Proponents of the recently proposed Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 16.1 believe it may enhance efficiency in multidistrict litigation proceedings if adopted, but there are serious concerns that it could actually hinder plaintiffs' access to justice through the courts — and there are fundamental flaws that deserve our attention, says Ashleigh Raso at Nigh Goldenberg.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Document Retention Best Practices To Lower Litigation Risks

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    As new technologies emerge and terabytes of data can be within the purview of a single discovery request, businesses small and large should take four document management steps to effectively minimize risks of litigation and discovery sanctions long before litigation ensues, says Kimbrilee Weber at Norris McLaughlin.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • New Eagle Take Permit Rule Should Help Wind Projects Soar

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    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's recently issued final rule revising the eagle take permit process should help wind energy developers obtain incidental take permits through a more transparent and expedited process, and mitigate the risk of improper take penalties faced by wind projects, says Jon Micah Goeller at Husch Blackwell.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

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