Transportation

  • January 21, 2022

    Uber Can't Use Lyft Win To Beat Wheelchair-Accessibility Trial

    Uber can't exit a bench trial over allegations it discriminates against people with disabilities by not providing wheelchair-accessible vehicles in two Southern cities, a California federal judge ruled on Friday, saying the case is distinguishable from a recent decision in favor of rival Lyft.

  • January 21, 2022

    ABA, AARP Sued By Moving Co. Over 'Wise Moves' TM

    A Maryland moving company that trademarked the name "Wise Moves" in 2015 hit the American Bar Association and the AARP with a trademark infringement suit in Illinois federal court on Friday over a book the two organizations published in 2020 bearing the same name.

  • January 21, 2022

    Calif. Ends Price-Fixing Fight With Japanese Auto Parts Co.

    California's beef with Japanese auto parts maker KYB Corp. over its role in a scheme to fix the price of shock absorbers quietly ended Thursday when the state's attorney general dropped its suit, declaring the matter fully settled.

  • January 21, 2022

    DHL Beats Claim It Overcharged Garden State Residents

    A New Jersey federal judge dismissed a proposed class action against DHL on Thursday that accused the package delivery corporation of adding a $17 fee for Garden State residents by claiming that the fee represented import duties, ruling the breach of contract claim doesn't apply.

  • January 21, 2022

    LATAM Says $1.4B Is Reasonable Deal On Plane Leases

    Chilean carrier LATAM Airlines Group SA on Friday asked a New York bankruptcy judge to approve $1.4 billion in settlements of aircraft lease claims, arguing the deals were reasonable compared to the $4 billion in claims the airline was facing.

  • January 21, 2022

    Emirati Family Says $90M Award Suit Doesn't Belong In NY

    An Emirati family is trying to dodge litigation filed by Cessna in New York federal court to enforce a $90 million arbitral award stemming from a defaulted business jet lease deal, taking aim at a "concocted" fraudulent transfer theory that they claim comes up short on jurisdiction.

  • January 21, 2022

    NJ Court Won't Halt Heavy Machinery Company's Patent Fight

    A New Jersey federal judge has refused to toss a suit accusing a heavy machinery company of infringing a competitor's control panel patent on a type of machinery meant to clear heavy road obstructions, finding that the claims were appropriately pled at this point.

  • January 21, 2022

    DC Circ. Judge Seems Fine With FERC OKing $2.1B Pipeline

    A D.C. Circuit judge on Friday indicated she's satisfied with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's reason for granting Nexus Gas Transmission LLC eminent domain authority for its $2.1 billion pipeline to export natural gas to foreign markets, pointing to the project's domestic benefits.

  • January 21, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: Adrian Builders, Sitex, Ryan

    Adrian Builders has reportedly sold a Miami retail property for $26 million, Sitex Group is said to have paid $30 million for a Brooklyn industrial property and Ryan Cos. is said to have sold a Miami warehouse for $34.69 million.

  • January 21, 2022

    VW To Pay $3.5M To Settle Ohio Emissions Tampering Claims

    Volkswagen AG will pay $3.5 million to end Ohio's claims alleging that the German automaker violated state environmental and anti-tampering laws through its 2015 "clean diesel" emissions-cheating scandal, Ohio's attorney general announced Friday.

  • January 21, 2022

    Turkish Bus Co. Wins $17M In Arbitration With Ex-Distributor

    A Turkish bus manufacturer has won $17 million in arbitration with its former exclusive U.S. distributor, which had allegedly led the manufacturer on a "years-long wild goose chase" to recoup its losses after the distributor ordered 74 buses and then refused to pay for them.

  • January 21, 2022

    Texas Justices Revive Fatal Navy Helicopter Crash Suit

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday revived a lawsuit against a military contractor accused of improperly maintaining a U.S. Navy helicopter that crashed and killed three service members, holding that courts can decide the case "without interfering with the military's judgment." 

  • January 21, 2022

    Trucking Co. Hit With NJ Bias Suit Over Medical Pot

    A trucking company has been hit with a discrimination suit in New Jersey state court by a would-be driver who claims the company did not hire him because of his status as a medical marijuana patient.

  • January 21, 2022

    Wis. Food Distributor Says Teamsters' Strike Broke Contract

    A food distributor has accused a Teamsters local in federal court of breaking a no-strike agreement when its leaders failed to dissuade workers from picketing at the distributor's Wisconsin location in sympathy with a strike by a Teamsters local in Indiana.

  • January 21, 2022

    Drivers Say Courier Co. Withholds OT, Steals Tips

    Courier service Same Day Delivery Inc. does not pay its drivers for overtime and unlawfully takes a cut of their tips while committing multiple additional violations of state and federal wage law, according to a proposed class action by five of the firm's workers.

  • January 21, 2022

    House Climate Deception Probe Ensnares Oil Co. Directors

    U.S. House Oversight Committee leaders have asked board members from Chevron, ExxonMobil, BP and Shell to testify for an investigation into whether the fossil fuel industry has intentionally blocked climate change action to protect their businesses.

  • January 21, 2022

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen more than 3,000 motorists go after a German carmaker, Fladgate LLP face a professional negligence claim from an investment group, and a Hungarian airline sue the publisher of its in-flight magazine. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • January 21, 2022

    Intel Makes Record $20B Investment In 2 Ohio Chip Factories

    Intel is investing north of $20 billion to build a pair of new chip factories in Ohio, marking the largest single investment in the private sector in the state's history, according to an announcement from the semiconductor company on Friday.

  • January 20, 2022

    Geico Gets Pandemic Insurance Refund Suit Cut, For Now

    A California federal judge on Thursday trimmed a proposed class action accusing Geico of refusing to pay back overcharged premiums when fewer people drove on the roads and submitted car accident claims during the pandemic.

  • January 20, 2022

    FERC Dems Press Case For Pipeline Approval Policy Overhaul

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday refused to yank its approval of a pipeline compressor station beset with safety problems, but Democratic commissioners said the issue highlights the need to boost consideration of environmental impacts in a looming revision of the agency's pipeline approval policy.

  • January 20, 2022

    Fla. Jury Awards Parents $10M For Son's RV Crash Death

    A Florida state jury has awarded $10 million to the parents of a Daytona Beach pedestrian who died after a motor home struck him while he was walking to work, finding the driver's employer, an RV dealership, totally responsible.

  • January 20, 2022

    Honda Secures $2.9M Deal To End Acura Touch-Screen Suit

    A California federal judge has finalized a nearly $2.9 million settlement ending a class action filed by Honda drivers who claim the automaker installed glitchy touch-screen consoles in certain Acuras.

  • January 20, 2022

    9th Circ. Rejects Pre-Scandal VW Car Owners' Damages Fight

    The Ninth Circuit said Thursday that drivers who sold their Volkswagen cars before the company's emissions-cheating scandal became public cannot sue for damages by claiming they overpaid for vehicles that weren't as environmentally friendly as promised, finding that the drivers' purported out-of-pocket losses weren't quantifiable.

  • January 20, 2022

    Utah Auto Crash Suit Not Filed Late, State Justices Find

    The Utah Supreme Court on Thursday revived a man's suit alleging he suffered a brain injury when his car was hit by a Commodity Transporters Inc. truck, saying the trial court misinterpreted state law when it found the man's claims could only be tolled if he was both "mentally incompetent" and without a legal guardian.

  • January 20, 2022

    Tenn. ALJ Classifies Pilots Club Property As Farmland

    A Tennessee club's land that includes an airstrip and other services for pilots should be classified as farmland, an administrative law judge ordered.

Expert Analysis

  • Corporate Boards Need Not Fear 7th Circ. Boeing Decision

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    The Seventh Circuit’s recent decision in Seafarers Pension Plan v. Bradway, over Boeing shareholders' rights to bring federal derivative suits over the 737 Max aircraft, may encourage creative Securities Exchange Act claims to avoid exclusive forum provisions, but boards of Delaware corporations still have tools to avoid duplicative litigation, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Rebuttal

    Trucking Cos. Need Stronger Insurance To Protect Public

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    A recent Law360 guest article urged lawmakers to implement liability protections for the trucking industry, but raising outdated trucking insurance limits would better incentivize companies to keep unsafe drivers and vehicles out of their fleets to begin with, protecting the industry and motorists alike, says Tad Thomas at The Thomas Law Offices and the American Association for Justice.

  • Series

    Employer's Agenda: Toyota Counsel Talks Worker Retention

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    Michael Martinez, managing counsel for labor and employment at Toyota Motor North America, discusses how companies and in-house counsel can address the pandemic-related labor shortage, and avoid common pitfalls when implementing wage increases, remote work setups and other well-meaning efforts to attract new workers.

  • Gov't Contractor Takeaways From Biden's Clean Energy Order

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    Attorneys at Covington discuss how President Joe Biden's recent net-zero emissions pledge and related executive actions are changing the landscape of federal procurement, creating new opportunities and challenges for government contractors.

  • 4 Consequences Of Gov't Contractor Antitrust Violations

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    Along with criminal penalties, significant collateral repercussions can follow a government contractor's conviction for antitrust violations, so vigilant compliance strategies are a must as the U.S. Department of Justice turns its attention to this area, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Make-Whole Claim Lessons From Hertz Bankruptcy Ruling

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    After the Delaware bankruptcy court's recent decision in Wells Fargo v. Hertz, courts may continue to hear the assertion that early payoff premiums constitute unmatured interest, which could shape best practices in formulating make-whole clauses to avoid such arguments, say attorneys at Mayer Brown.

  • The Rising Demand For Commercial Litigators In 2022

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    Amid broken supply chains, pandemic-induced bankruptcies and a rise in regulation by litigation, strong commercial litigators — strategists who are adept in trying a range of tortious and contractual disputes — are becoming a must-have for many law firms, making this year an opportune moment to make the career switch, say Michael Ascher and Kimberly Donlon at Major Lindsey.

  • Import Best Practices Under New Uyghur Forced Labor Law

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    Rachel Alpert and Grace Signorelli-Cassady at Jenner & Block discuss key provisions of the recently enacted Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, and offer compliance strategies that may position importers to demonstrate their supply chains are free from forced labor when the act's provisions presumptively barring many Chinese imports go into effect in June.

  • When Fair Notice Precludes Punitive Damages

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    The ongoing pandemic has done little to slow the continued proliferation of novel theories of tort liability, but even when courts approve, the U.S. Constitution's requirement of fair notice may prohibit punitive damages, says Mitchell Morris at Butler Snow.

  • Aviation Watch: Resolving The FAA-FCC Fight Over 5G

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    Concerns over interference with aircraft altimeters are delaying the U.S. rollout of 5G wireless technology, and it may take special action by the Biden administration to resolve the standoff between the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Aviation Administration over the issue, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • What Infrastructure Act Means For Transmission Line Projects

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    The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act gives the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission authority to supersede state siting decisions for electric transmission projects, but environmental review requirements make a sudden acceleration of transmission line construction unlikely, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • How In-House Counsel Can Make The Case For Settling Early

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    Following the recent settlement in McDonald's v. Easterbrook, in-house counsel should consider decision-tree analyses and values-driven communications plans to secure effective, early resolutions in litigation, saving time and money and moving the company mission forward, say Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein and Richard Torrenzano at The Torrenzano Group.

  • New Anti-Dumping Rules Both Clarify And Complicate

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    The U.S. Department of Commerce's recent regulatory changes concerning anti-dumping and countervailing duty proceedings refine the process and helpfully eliminate steps for petitioners, but also create new hurdles for nonpetitioning parties, say William Isasi and Jordan Bakst at Covington.

  • To Retain Talent, GCs Should Prioritize Mission Statements

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    With greater legal demands and an increasing number of workers resigning during the pandemic, general counsel should take steps to articulate their teams' values in departmental mission statements, which will help them better prioritize corporate values and attract and retain talent, says Catherine Kemnitz at Axiom.

  • Pa. Jurisdiction Ruling Is Good News For Out-Of-State Cos.

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    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court's recent landmark decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern, ending the practice of subjecting foreign corporations to general personal jurisdiction based on their registration to conduct business in the state, should significantly reduce lawsuits against out-of-state companies in Pennsylvania courts, says Benjamin Hartwell at Ward Greenberg.

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