Transportation

  • August 21, 2019

    Transit Officials And Wi-Fi Group Split Over 5.9 GHz Use

    A group that advocates for the expansion of Wi-Fi has told the Federal Communications Commission that the valuable 5.9 gigahertz spectrum band dedicated to vehicle safety communications can and should accommodate wireless device traffic, contrary to the beliefs of state transit regulators.

  • August 21, 2019

    Mass. Driver Asks 1st Circ. To Revive Mercedes Defect Suit

    A Massachusetts Mercedes-Benz owner asked the First Circuit on Tuesday to revive his proposed class action against the luxury car maker, claiming a judge was wrong to dismiss the suit over “catastrophic” radiator defects that pose safety issues and require pricey repairs.

  • August 21, 2019

    Pembina Snaps Up Kinder Morgan Canada, Pipeline For $3.3B

    Calgary-based Pembina Pipeline Corp. said Wednesday it has agreed to pay a combined CA$4.35 billion ($3.28 billion) to buy Kinder Morgan Canada and part of the Cochin pipeline in a deal that values the Kinder Morgan Inc. unit at CA$2.3 billion.

  • August 20, 2019

    American Airlines To Pay $22M To End False Mail Time Claims

    American Airlines will shell out $22.1 million to resolve claims it lied about delivery times on mail it delivered in the United States as well as abroad, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday.

  • August 20, 2019

    DOJ Calls Sabre's Bluff, Challenges $360M Farelogix Merger

    The U.S. Department of Justice filed suit in a Delaware federal court Tuesday to block Sabre's planned $360 million acquisition of its "disruptive" airline booking technology competitor Farelogix, a move that comes just days after Sabre all but dared the DOJ to challenge the merger.

  • August 20, 2019

    Carnival Avoids Some Claims Over Onboard Fatal Heart Attack

    A Carnival Corp. passenger won't be able to pursue punitive damages and certain other claims against the cruise line over a man's onboard heart attack death that happened two days after ship doctors had treated and released him, a Florida federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • August 20, 2019

    Walmart Claims Faulty Tesla Solar Panels Are Starting Fires

    Walmart has hit SolarCity Corp. with a breach of contract and negligence lawsuit in New York state court that accuses Tesla’s solar energy subsidiary of negligently installing solar panels that have started at least seven fires on the rooftops of retail stores in Ohio, Maryland and California.

  • August 20, 2019

    Mass. Amazon Driver Exempt From Arbitration In Wage Suit

    A delivery driver suing Amazon over alleged unpaid wages and unreimbursed expenses counts as a transportation worker exempt from arbitration, a Massachusetts federal judge ruled Tuesday, but he’ll have to fight the case in Washington state alongside a similar suit.

  • August 20, 2019

    Trump Revises Nuclear-Powered Spaceflight Policy

    President Donald Trump on Tuesday released new guidelines for the use of nuclear power for spaceflight, intended to aid both NASA's push toward Mars and commercial space missions, according to the White House.

  • August 20, 2019

    Delta Urges 1st Circ. Not To Revive 'False Imprisonment' Suit

    Delta told the First Circuit on Tuesday that a federal judge got it right when he dismissed a suit brought by a noted Massachusetts doctor who claimed the airline detained him against his will because the man's claims were preempted by the Montreal Convention treaty on international air travel.

  • August 20, 2019

    Homeowners Say Enterprise Pipeline Caused $50M In Damage

    Two Houston-area residents have filed a $50 million putative class action lawsuit against Enterprise Products Partners LP and two other companies behind a pipeline project they claim caused flooding on their properties.

  • August 20, 2019

    Fired JetBlue Analyst Slams Airline's Bid To End Bias Suit

    A former JetBlue analyst slammed the airline's move for a quick win in her discrimination case, arguing Tuesday that she has presented a “convincing mosaic” of evidence showing there are factual issues to be tried in court.

  • August 20, 2019

    Carnival Can't Scotch Suit Over Shipboard Death, Family Says

    Family members of a Carnival Corp. passenger who died aboard ship after suffering a heart attack have urged a Florida federal court to throw out the cruise line’s bid to dismiss their wrongful death suit, saying that its “outrageous conduct” while treating him supports their case.

  • August 20, 2019

    Auto Cos. Want Full 9th Circ. Redo In Nissan Defect Spat

    Automakers have urged the full Ninth Circuit to review a panel’s decision reviving a consumer class certification bid in a suit alleging defective manual transmissions in Nissan vehicles, saying class action plaintiffs can now go on a cash grab using dicey damages theories.

  • August 20, 2019

    Uber Wins Sanctions, Shakes Suit Over Buenos Aires Debut

    A California federal judge sanctioned an attorney from Argentina on Monday for subjecting Uber’s lawyers to “a needless round of motion work” in successfully fending off claims that the ride-hailing giant let him take the fall for its “disastrous” 2016 rollout in Buenos Aires.

  • August 19, 2019

    Siemens Train Control Patent Award Boosted To $14.2M

    A Delaware federal judge has awarded Siemens Mobility Inc. nearly $14.2 million in its suit accusing rival Wabtec Corp. of making train control products that rely on features that infringe its patents, more than doubling the initial jury award.

  • August 19, 2019

    No Evidence Calif. Man Threatened Witness, Court Told

    The U.S. failed to demonstrate witness tampering before revoking the prison privileges of a California businessman accused of participating in a $511 million renewable-energy tax fraud scheme, the man told a Utah federal court.

  • August 19, 2019

    NJ Airport Contractor Denied Sales Tax Refund For Supplies

    The New Jersey Tax Court denied a contractor's $1.2 million sales and use tax refund request for materials used to install a baggage handling system at Newark Liberty International Airport, saying the work wasn't performed for a tax-exempt organization.

  • August 19, 2019

    Uber Must Face Disability Bias Claims, 7th Circ. Told

    A Chicago disability rights group has asked the Seventh Circuit to revive its claims that Uber has failed to accommodate passengers using motorized wheelchairs, saying it sufficiently established standing to sue under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

  • August 19, 2019

    Cox’s CDK Auto Data Deal Off-Limits In Antitrust Row

    The confidentiality of the settlement between CDK Global and Cox Automotive outweighs any potential value its terms might have in sprawling antitrust litigation where car dealers continue to say CDK and a rival monopolized the market for crucial auto dealer data, an Illinois federal judge ruled Friday.   

  • August 19, 2019

    Baltimore Tells 4th Circ. Climate Suit Should Proceed

    Chevron and other oil giants shouldn't be able to delay litigating Baltimore's claim that they are liable for climate change-related damages while they fight to keep the case out of state court, city officials have told the Fourth Circuit.

  • August 19, 2019

    Airline Group Presses Bid To Invalidate Wash. Sick Leave Law

    The lead lobbying group for the nation's largest airlines has told a federal court that Washington state cannot enforce its paid sick leave law on an industry regulated by the federal government, insisting the state law upends interstate commerce.

  • August 19, 2019

    Feds Beef Up Boustani Indictment Before Dismissal Args

    Federal prosecutors filed a new indictment in the Mozambique corruption case against Lebanese salesman Jean Boustani on Monday, days ahead of a hearing on Boustani’s claim that the case should be dismissed for lacking a connection to the U.S.

  • August 19, 2019

    States Push 1st Circ. To Revive Suit Over EPA 'Expert Purge'

    Ten states, along with the District of Columbia, asked the First Circuit Monday to revive a dismissed Massachusetts lawsuit over the Trump administration's so-called purge of scientists who receive U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grants from the EPA's advisory committees.

  • August 19, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: Jones Day, Stag Industrial, Stockbridge

    Jones Day is reportedly leasing four floors at an under-construction Chicago tower, Stag Industrial is said to have picked up three Wisconsin properties for $13.9 million, and Stockbridge Capital has reportedly bought five Florida warehouses for $116.5 million.

Expert Analysis

  • Can Text Messages Or An Airbag Cause A Suicide?

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    An infamous 2017 criminal case in Massachusetts and a recent civil case in South Carolina both hinged on whether other parties can be responsible for someone's suicide. Both cases suggest a trend toward applying traditional tort principles, and consideration of special factors suggesting the foreseeability of suicide, say Christopher Collier and Michael Arndt of Hawkins Parnell.

  • Coast Guard Cybersecurity Guidance Puts Shippers On Notice

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    Recent cyberattacks have spurred the U.S. Coast Guard to publish a marine safety information bulletin and a marine safety alert addressing vulnerabilities of shipboard computer systems, potentially triggering significant legal obligations for owners and operators, say attorneys at Husch Blackwell.

  • House And Senate Pipeline Bills: Ships Passing In The Night

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    The Pipeline Safety Act is up for reauthorization this year, and both the Democratic House and Republican Senate have produced draft legislation. But it is unlikely that Congress will meet the reauthorization deadline of Sept. 30, because the bills have almost no common ground, say attorneys at Troutman Sanders.

  • What 2 Recent OFAC Cases Say About Compliance Priorities

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    Findings of violation issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control earlier this month to U.S. companies DNI Express Shipping and Southern Cross Aviation are illustrative of the continued focus, by OFAC and other agencies, on completeness and accuracy in both responsive and voluntary disclosures, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

  • Aviation Watch: What's Behind General Aviation Safety Issues

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    The contemporary general aviation safety picture is much improved, thanks to better planes, better safety equipment and a better safety culture. But recent accidents in corporate and skydiving flight operations point to a need for further action by Congress, regulators and the aviation community, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and private pilot.

  • Crisis Messaging To Protect Law Firm Brand And Bottom Line

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    When crises occur, such as data security incidents or gender bias suits, a well-prepared law firm has a thoroughly tested communications plan at the ready, which ensures the firm is the most proactive news source, prevents the crisis from escalating and notifies stakeholders about mitigation efforts, says Zach Olsen at Infinite Global.

  • State Net

    Calif. Emissions Agreement A Model For State-Industry Deals

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    Bypassing the Trump administration, California recently reached a deal with four automakers to improve fuel efficiency and reduce carbon emissions. The agreement could set a precedent for how state governments and industry can work together to address major issues, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • What Cos. Should Consider To Prep For Nev. Data Privacy Law

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    Website operators that collect and sell Nevada residents' personal information should lay the groundwork for compliance with Nevada Senate Bill 220, effective on Oct. 1, which will be the first U.S. law to grant consumers the right to opt out of the sale of their data, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • TM Case At The Intersection Of Antitrust And Design Law

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    The recent Texas federal court case Tricon Precast v. Easi-Set involves a potential use of antitrust law that is highly unusual and may be unprecedented: arguing, via the statutory defense against claims of trademark infringement, that use of an industrial design trade dress violates U.S. antitrust laws, says Rick Sanders of Aaron Sanders. 

  • Perspectives

    What You Should Know About Courtroom Closures

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    At attorney Greg Craig’s trial in D.C. federal court this week, the courtroom was cleared so prospective jurors could answer sensitive questions. Even seasoned litigators were left wondering about the nature of this subtle, yet significant, issue involving Sixth Amendment public trial rights, says Luke Cass at Quarles & Brady.

  • FERC Rate Reforms Mean More Data Collection For Cos.

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    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's revised regulations for selling energy services at market-based rates likely will streamline rate applications and related compliance filings, but they could create a significant initial burden for some companies, say Adam Wenner and Cory Lankford of Orrick.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Seaweed Scientist's Odyssey

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    In the early 1980s, I was working on my Ph.D. in marine biology and ecology. As part of an international team of scientists studying oil spill impacts on marine ecosystems, I saw a niche opportunity to combine science and law, says Andrew Davis of Shipman & Goodwin.

  • Parking Enforcement Case May Reverberate Beyond 6th Circ.

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    Saginaw, Michigan, has long used tire chalking to determine whether parked cars should be ticketed, but the Sixth Circuit recently ruled that the city had not established that the practice was reasonable without a warrant. Local governments and associated agencies should be concerned about the fallout if this decision stands, say attorneys at BB&K.

  • How To Counter Jury Reliance On Plaintiff's Damages Ask

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    Years of interviewing jurors and observing deliberation show that the amount juries award in damages is almost always influenced by the amount of the plaintiff's demand, but there are three ways defense counsel can combat this anchoring effect, says Christina Marinakis at Litigation Insights.

  • NY Tax Minutes: Trump Tax Returns, New Corporate Tax Regs

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    In their roundup of New York's recent tax law highlights, Timothy Noonan and Craig Reilly of Hodgson Russ discuss the ongoing battle over President Donald Trump’s state tax returns and New York's recently updated corporation franchise tax apportionment regulations.