Transportation

  • January 21, 2020

    Delta Air Lines Sued For Dumping Jet Fuel On LA Playground

    Delta Air Lines negligently dumped thousands of gallons of jet fuel at low altitude over several elementary schools from a commercial airplane making an emergency landing at Los Angeles International Airport, according to Los Angeles County teachers suing the airline over their exposure to the falling jet fuel.

  • January 21, 2020

    Calif. Rips Uber, Postmates' Dynamex Law Injunction Bid

    California has fired back at a bid by Uber, Postmates and gig-economy workers to block a controversial state law that raises the bar for Golden State workers to be legally classified as independent contractors, saying the law does not “unconstitutionally” target app-based companies.

  • January 21, 2020

    Juno Reaches Deal With Creditors On Ch. 11 Doc Production

    The unsecured creditors committee in ride-hailing service Juno USA’s Chapter 11 case has reached a deal with the debtor to resolve a motion demanding discovery related to a prepetition asset sale with Lyft Inc., the committee told a Delaware judge Tuesday.

  • January 21, 2020

    Royal Caribbean Spared Punitive Damages For Stormy Cruise

    A Florida federal judge has ruled that passengers on a Royal Caribbean cruise that got caught in a hurricane-strength storm won't be able to seek punitive damages against the cruise company because they failed to show the company intentionally put the ship in harm's way.

  • January 21, 2020

    Attys Behind $77M Virgin Wage Win Sought $13M, Get $6M

    Lawyers for Virgin America flight attendants who recently won $77 million over claims the airline stiffed workers on pay and rest breaks were awarded nearly $6 million in fees by a California federal judge on Tuesday, which was about half the amount they had requested.

  • January 21, 2020

    Retiree Conflict Dooms Mortality Table Class, American Says

    A class action seeking to represent thousands of American Airlines retirees who say the airline’s use of outdated mortality tables means they’re losing benefits shouldn’t be certified since some pensioners would suffer a financial hit if the plaintiffs prevail, American told a Texas federal judge.

  • January 21, 2020

    WP Carey Drops £85M On UK Logistics Facility

    Real estate investment trust W. P. Carey said Tuesday it bought a U.K. logistics facility currently leased by electronics company Dixons Carphone for £85 million ($112 million).

  • January 17, 2020

    Tribunal Orders Pacific Drilling To Pay Samsung Unit $320M

    A London tribunal has ordered the Luxembourg drill ship company Pacific Drilling SA to pay $320 million to Samsung Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., one of the world's largest shipbuilders, following a dispute over a soured $517.5 million contract to construct an ultra-deepwater drillship.

  • January 17, 2020

    Freight Rail Co. Says Partners Group Stole Biz Secrets

    Under the pretense of investing in MidRail LLC, Partners Group Inc. stole confidential business information from the freight rail company, according to a lawsuit filed Friday in New York state court accusing Partners Group of costing MidRail tens of millions of dollars.

  • January 17, 2020

    'Clean Diesel' Bellwether Jurors Will Learn VW Admitted Fraud

    Jurors on an upcoming bellwether trial for Volkswagen owners who opted out of a $10 billion settlement in multidistrict litigation over the automaker's "clean diesel" emissions scandal will hear that Volkswagen admitted to committing fraud, a California federal judge said during a status conference Friday.

  • January 17, 2020

    Texas Justices To Consider Insurers' Duty In Fraud Cases

    The Texas Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear Loya Insurance Co.'s argument that the justices should carve out an exception to a state rule governing whether an insurer has a duty to defend a policy holder in cases where there is "undisputed evidence of fraud."

  • January 17, 2020

    Delta Air, Siemens Sued Over In-Flight Assault On Officer

    A federal law enforcement officer and her husband sued Delta Air Lines Inc. and Siemens Energy Inc. in Pennsylvania state court after a drunk and since-convicted Siemens employee on a work trip assaulted the officer during a flight from Pittsburgh, an incident the couple said could have been avoided if Delta hadn't allowed the visibly intoxicated man on the plane.

  • January 17, 2020

    Uber's Bid To End Monopoly Suit Faces Skeptical Judge

    A California federal magistrate judge expressed reservations Friday about dismissing claims that Uber's monopolistic tactics drove a ride-hailing rival out of business, saying he's disinclined to "cut them off at the pass" even though the defunct company faces big hurdles proving Uber's monopoly power.

  • January 17, 2020

    Duck Boat Operator Settles Final Claims In Fatal Sinking Suit

    The operator of an amphibious "duck boat" that sank in a Missouri lake in 2018 and killed 17 people has settled the last of 31 claims filed by the victims and their families for an undisclosed amount, a company spokeswoman confirmed Friday.

  • January 17, 2020

    DoorDash Says $39M Deal Should Halt Courier Cases

    DoorDash has asked a California federal judge to hit pause on a consolidated suit accusing the app-based food delivery company of misclassifying thousands of couriers while a state court decides whether to approve a $39 million settlement in a similar case that would purportedly cover nearly all the federal claimants.

  • January 17, 2020

    UK’s £106M Flybe Tax Break Could Be Illegal, Watchdog Says

    The U.K. government’s decision to bail out budget airline Flybe drew criticism Friday from a watchdog group, which questioned the deal’s legality, including deferral of a £106 million ($138 million) tax bill stemming from per-passenger duties.

  • January 17, 2020

    Celadon Lands $14.5M Stalking Horse Deal For Trucking Co.

    Bankrupt trucking firm Celadon Group Inc. filed a proposed stalking horse deal worth $14.5 million Thursday in Delaware bankruptcy court that sets the floor bid for the upcoming Chapter 11 auction of its profitable Taylor Express assets being sold as a going concern.

  • January 17, 2020

    Tanenbaum Keale Snags Marshall Dennehey Partner In Pa.

    In a move that has helped push the firm into a more spacious set of Philadelphia-area offices, litigation boutique Tanenbaum Keale LLP has announced the hiring of a former Marshall Dennehey Warner Coleman & Goggin PC product liability partner.

  • January 17, 2020

    Petition Seeks Probe Into Tesla Cars' Sudden Acceleration

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said it is looking into a petition asking the agency to investigate a claim that about a half-million Tesla Inc. vehicles are affected by a defect that causes sudden unintended acceleration.

  • January 17, 2020

    Infrastructure Tax Deal Could Hinge On Mnuchin-Neal Talks

    A renewal of the five-year surface transportation law represents one of the few chances to move tax legislation this year, and negotiations may hinge on the tenuous relationship between Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and top House tax writer Richard Neal.

  • January 17, 2020

    High Court To Weigh Ford’s Challenge To State Defect Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear Ford’s challenge to two “capacious” decisions that allowed plaintiffs to bring defect suits in states where the auto giant says it does not have a sufficient connection.

  • January 17, 2020

    Boeing Max Pilots Can't Be Anonymous In Lost Wages Suits

    An Illinois federal judge ruled that international pilots can't anonymously sue Boeing for allegedly misrepresenting the safety of its 737 Max jets, ordering the pilots be unmasked before they can press ahead with consolidated litigation seeking lost wages from the grounded jets.

  • January 17, 2020

    Crypto Market Maker Sues Fr8 Token Issuer For $1.8M

    A global cryptocurrency market maker and an investor filed a $1.8 million lawsuit in New York federal court accusing Fr8 Network Inc. and two principals of fleecing them with a fraudulent token offering.

  • January 17, 2020

    US Chamber Wants To 'Neuter' Judges, Sens. Tell 1st Circ.

    Rhode Island and Massachusetts senators fired back against the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's arguments at the First Circuit that a climate change suit against Shell, ExxonMobil and other energy giants belongs in federal court, arguing that the chamber is self-interested and wants to "neuter the judicial branch" to benefit fossil fuel funders.

  • January 17, 2020

    FAA Properly Vetted Boeing Max Jets, Review Panel Finds

    The Federal Aviation Administration vetted Boeing's 737 Max jet according to rigorous aircraft certification procedures, a special review committee has said, suggesting any heavy-handed overhaul of the FAA's program could upend aviation safety.

Expert Analysis

  • Iran Airspace Bans May Lead To EU Passenger Claims

    Author Photo

    After the recent killing of Qasem Soleimani and the downing of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, the commercial aviation sector must consider how resulting restrictions on air travel may affect passenger compensation claims under European Union rules, says James Jordan of Holman Fenwick.

  • Key Trends In Energy Antitrust Enforcement And Litigation

    Author Photo

    Antitrust agencies and private litigants continued to focus on the energy industry in 2019, and new antitrust policy initiatives announced by the U.S. Department of Justice last year will offer energy companies opportunities to avoid prosecution in certain cases, say attorneys at Vinson & Elkins.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

    Author Photo

    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • What's Changed And What's The Same In Final CFIUS Rules

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s final rules implementing the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act complete the revamp of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, which will be more complex and better resourced to address evolving national security risks that arise in the context of foreign investments, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

  • Energy Cos. Face China State Secrecy Law Risks

    Author Photo

    Multinational energy and natural resources companies doing business in China face particular risks related to China's state secrecy laws, due to the broad and vaguely defined range of information that may be classified as secret, say Alvin Xiao and Fabian Roday of Fangda Partners.

  • Gov't Contractor Suspension And Debarment: 2019 In Review

    Author Photo

    Attorneys at Covington look back at last year's policy trends and developments, legislative and rulemaking activity, and notable federal district court rulings related to the exclusion of contractors from doing business with the federal government.

  • Autonomous Vehicle Guidance Gives Industry Room To Grow

    Author Photo

    The White House's recently updated guidance on the deployment of autonomous vehicles outlines broad principles for AV development, but does not identify best practices or create binding requirements, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

  • White House NEPA Overhaul Likely To Face Legal Challenges

    Author Photo

    The White House Council on Environmental Quality's recently proposed revisions to regulations implementing the National Environmental Policy Act are virtually certain to be challenged in the courts — especially a proposal to eliminate evaluations of projects' cumulative environmental impacts, say attorneys with Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

    Author Photo

    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • Policy Push Yields Mixed Results For Biofuels Sector

    Author Photo

    Policymakers delivered a mixed bag to the biofuels industry at the end of 2019, with both a law retroactively extending the biodiesel and renewable diesel credit, and guidance from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that could undercut the biofuels market, say Brandon Kirkham and Joshua Andrews of Faegre Baker Daniels Consulting.

  • Defense Contracting Law Developments From 2019

    Author Photo

    Creation of the U.S. Space Force, initiatives to improve U.S. cybersecurity, and near record-high spending on government contracting were just a few of the most notable developments in U.S. Department of Defense contracting last year, says Joseph Berger of Thompson Hine.

  • 7 Insider Tips For Working With In-House Counsel

    Author Photo

    For outside firms wondering how to best support busy in-house lawyers, several practices can help navigate critical legal issues and novel business challenges while strengthening the working relationship, says Virginia Hudson, associate general counsel at Capital One.

  • The Top FMLA And ADA Decisions Of 2019: Part 2

    Author Photo

    Linda Dwoskin and Melissa Squire at Dechert conclude their discussion of last year's most significant Family and Medical Leave Act and Americans with Disabilities Act decisions with a review of attendance point systems, safety-related job exclusions and FMLA fraud.

  • 50 Years Later, Interpretive Challenges Remain For RICO

    Author Photo

    In the 50 years since the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was passed, courts' attempts to clarify the statute have had some success, but many interpretive dilemmas remain unresolved, says Randy Gordon of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • The Top FMLA And ADA Decisions Of 2019: Part 1

    Author Photo

    In the first of two articles discussing last year’s most significant Family and Medical Leave Act and Americans with Disabilities Act decisions, Linda Dwoskin and Melissa Squire at Dechert review coverage for potential future disabilities, what constitutes sufficient notice of the need for leave, and working from home as a reasonable accommodation.