Transportation

  • August 10, 2020

    Norwegian Cruise Beats Insurance Kickback Suit At 11th Circ.

    The Eleventh Circuit found Monday that a lower court correctly tossed a proposed class action alleging Norwegian Cruise Lines deceptively sold travel insurance, holding that the customers' claims are barred by the insurance contracts' arbitration provision and class action waivers.

  • August 10, 2020

    Michelin, Carlstar Agree To Settle Trade Secrets Battle

    Tire giant Michelin and The Carlstar Group LLC have struck a deal to resolve a suit over a longtime Michelin employee who allegedly took trade secrets with him when he jumped ship for Carlstar.

  • August 10, 2020

    Colo. Tells 10th Circ. Block Of Trump Water Rule Was Proper

    Colorado is urging the Tenth Circuit to uphold a lower court's decision barring the Trump administration's rule narrowing the scope of the Clean Water Act from taking effect in the state, saying it would cause serious environmental damage if reinstated.

  • August 10, 2020

    Hyundai Making Elite Seller Club For Luxury Line, Dealer Says

    Hyundai is skirting Florida law in its bid to showcase its luxury Genesis brand of automobiles completely separately by punishing dealers who don't agree to build new showrooms, according to a new lawsuit.

  • August 10, 2020

    9th Circ. Nixes Pre-Trial Repatriation Order In Fraud Case

    An indicted health care executive doesn't have to repatriate up to $7.2 million that he may have put in African banks before his fraud case goes to trial, the Ninth Circuit ruled Monday, finding that an order requiring him to do so violated his rights.

  • August 10, 2020

    Amazon Aims To Sink Fired Driver's Retaliation Claim

    An Amazon unit is urging a New Jersey federal judge to toss a former delivery driver's lawsuit asserting he was fired for complaining about alleged wage violations, arguing that the retaliation claims should be lodged in the previous complaint he filed about his compensation.

  • August 10, 2020

    Fiat Chrysler Rips GM For Smear Campaign, Paid Moles Claim

    Fiat Chrysler on Monday slammed General Motors for running a smear campaign with "preposterous" claims that FCA stashed millions in foreign bank accounts to funnel bribes to senior auto workers union officials and planted moles within GM to corrupt the collective bargaining process.

  • August 10, 2020

    Mercedes Can't Jump-Start NJ Antitrust Claims Over Shipping

    Mercedes-Benz failed to persuade a New Jersey appeals court to revive a state price-fixing suit against several shipping companies as the judges held Monday that all the carmaker's claims are superseded by federal law.

  • August 10, 2020

    Judge Says Indicted Ex-Exec Can't Have Mexico B-Day Bash

    An Indiana federal judge has rejected an ex-Celadon Group Inc. executive's request to travel to Mexico for his 40th birthday beach celebration with family and friends while he faces criminal securities and accounting fraud charges back at home.

  • August 10, 2020

    Lima Asks To Undo 'Corrupt' Road Project's $66M Arbitral Win

    Lima is asking a D.C. federal court to vacate a $66 million arbitral award issued to a company with ties to the scandal-ridden Brazilian conglomerate Odebrecht following a dispute over a road construction project in the Peruvian capital, saying the underlying contract was procured through bribery.

  • August 10, 2020

    Uber And Lyft Can't Treat Calif. Drivers As Contractors

    Uber and Lyft must reclassify California drivers as employees, a state court judge said Monday in a pivotal win for state enforcers and workers' advocates that means the workers will get sick leave, wage minimums and other job protections.   

  • August 10, 2020

    Uber Can't Escape Investor Suit Over Scandal-Scarred IPO

    A California federal judge said Uber must face a proposed securities class action alleging it duped shareholders about its numerous corporate scandals and downplayed risks ahead of its May 2019 initial public offering, saying there's enough to suggest that Uber may have overhyped its business prospects.

  • August 10, 2020

    Rising Star: Holland & Knight's Jameson Rice

    Holland & Knight LLP's Jameson Rice has emerged as an expert in transportation blockchain technology, most recently negotiating a deal between railroad giant CSX Transportation Inc. and IBM and Maersk's massive supply chain platform TradeLens, earning him a spot among the transportation law practitioners under age 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • August 07, 2020

    Drivers Seek Sanctions Against BMW In Defective Engine Suit

    Five BMW drivers who opted out of a nationwide class action lawsuit told a Massachusetts federal court the automaker should face sanctions for repeatedly refusing to hand over discovery, despite the fact that the court has previously ruled that the type of document requested is relevant.

  • August 07, 2020

    Bail Denied For Alleged Ghosn Escape Accomplices

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Friday declined to release a former Green Beret and his son while they battle extradition to Japan for allegedly helping Nissan's former CEO escape that country, ruling that they have neither proven that they're being held illegally, nor have they shown any unusual circumstances to warrant release.

  • August 07, 2020

    Ill. Mayor Charged With Bribery Plot, Filing False Tax Returns

    Federal prosecutors lobbed bribery charges Friday against the mayor of a Chicago suburb who they say requested and accepted cash, campaign contributions and other benefits from a red-light camera company that had been serving the municipality.

  • August 07, 2020

    Honeywell Must Face Asbestos Suit, Ohio Appeals Court Says

    An Ohio appeals court on Thursday revived a widow's suit against Honeywell alleging that her late husband was exposed to asbestos in its brake products, finding that a jury could conclude that her husband's mesothelioma was caused by his exposure.

  • August 07, 2020

    Soldier Can't Sue Over Car Financing, Court Told

    Car financing company United Auto Credit Corp. urged a California federal court to permanently toss a soldier's Military Lending Act claims that it failed to properly disclose certain costs and fees, arguing Thursday the financing contract is not subject to the law.

  • August 07, 2020

    Dems Seek Info On Trump's Fast-Tracked Projects

    Nearly 60 Democratic members of Congress have demanded that the Trump administration come clean about which major infrastructure projects have benefited from an executive order to fast-track environmental reviews amid the economic downturn sparked by the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • August 07, 2020

    Fiat Chrysler Drivers' Jeep Engine Defect Suits Joined In Mich.

    A Michigan federal court has consolidated nine proposed consumer class actions accusing Fiat Chrysler of knowingly selling Jeep vehicles with dangerously defective engines that sucked up excessive amounts of oil, resulting in premature wear and catastrophic engine failure.

  • August 07, 2020

    Real Estate Rumors: Hales Franciscan, Omninet, Estate

    Hales Franciscan is now reportedly hoping to sell all of its Chicago campus, Omninet Capital has reportedly leased out 28,800 square feet east of Los Angeles to Carmichael International Service, and Estate Investments Group is said to be hoping to build a 23-story mixed-use tower in North Miami Beach.

  • August 07, 2020

    Son Of COVID-19 Victim Quietly Drops Princess Cruise Suit

    The son of a 74-year-old man who died of COVID-19 following a trip on a Princess Cruise Lines Ltd. vessel has quietly dropped his wrongful death claims in California federal court, a few weeks before a hearing set to rule on the company's motion to dismiss.

  • August 07, 2020

    Virgin Atlantic Lands US Recognition Of UK Refinancing

    A New York bankruptcy judge Friday granted Chapter 15 recognition to Virgin Atlantic's U.K. restructuring proceedings and set the airline's U.S. contracts in place until the company goes to court in the U.K. in September.

  • August 07, 2020

    Rising Star: Hogan Lovells' Hannah Graae

    Hogan Lovells' Hannah Graae has steered automotive clients such as Ford Motor Co. through environmental regulatory hurdles, as well as new rules governing emerging mobility technology and autonomous vehicles, earning her a spot among transportation attorneys under age 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • August 07, 2020

    Cattle Group's Challenge To Trump Water Rule Falls Short

    An Oregon federal judge on Thursday refused to block the Trump administration rule narrowing the scope of the Clean Water Act, tossing a challenge to the rule lodged by a ranching industry group.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    ADA Protects Lawyers With Disabilities, But We Must Do More

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    As an attorney with cerebral palsy, Danielle Liebl at Reed Smith says that while the 30-year-old Americans with Disabilities Act has protected her against discrimination, the legal industry must do more to accommodate lawyers with disabilities and make them more comfortable in self-identifying.

  • Perspectives

    Legal Deserts Threaten Justice In Rural America

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    Many small towns and rural counties have few lawyers or none at all, which threatens the notion of justice for all Americans and demands creative solutions from legislators, bar associations and law schools, says Patricia Refo, president of the American Bar Association.

  • How COVID-19 May Change Long-Term Aviation Outlook

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    Survival is an immediate concern for many airlines facing pandemic-related drops in air travel, which is exerting economic pressure that will fundamentally change the landscape for companies throughout the aviation ecosystem, say Matthew Herman and Amna Arshad at Freshfields Bruckhaus.

  • Neb. Ruling May Squash Consent By Registration Theory

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    In Lanham v. BNSF, the Nebraska Supreme Court's first-of-its-kind decision — which rejected on constitutional grounds the argument that corporations consent to jurisdiction where they register to do business — opens up a new line of precedent that defense counsel may use to shut the door on this long-debated theory, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • 1st Circ. Ruling Complicates Gig Worker Arbitration Pacts

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    The First Circuit’s recent ruling that Amazon delivery drivers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act opens the door to patchwork state enforcement, and will likely force gig economy employers to reevaluate arbitration agreements and class action waivers, say Christopher Feudo and Christian Garcia at Foley Hoag.

  • Foreign Discovery Ruling May Provide New Defense Tool

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    Motransa, a recent first-of-its-kind Florida federal court decision moving a foreign discovery proceeding to arbitration, may provide a new defensive option for U.S. targets of Section 1782 discovery demands, say Alexander Lawrence and David Hambrick at MoFo.

  • Analyzing Upward And Downward Trends In Legal Tech

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    Advances in legal technology are often accompanied by bombastic overstatements, but it is important to separate the wheat from the chaff by looking at where various technologies stand on the hype curve, says Lance Eliot at Stanford Law School.

  • How Congress May Bail Out FERC On Tolling Orders

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent ruling in Allegheny Defense Project v. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission deals a major blow to FERC's use of tolling orders to forestall judicial rehearings, but Congress may soon come to the agency's aid, say Sandra Rizzo and David Skillman at Arnold & Porter.

  • Climate Change Litigation Looms Over Trump Enviro Overhaul

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    Updated regulations from the White House Council on Environmental Quality likely preclude government agencies from considering climate change in most National Environmental Policy Act analyses, making litigation over the revisions all but certain, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Opinion

    ABA's New Guidance On Litigation Funding Misses The Mark

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    The American Bar Association should revise its recently approved best practices on third-party litigation funding as they do not reflect how legal finance actually works and could create confusion among lawyers, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • Regulatory Concerns For US Cos.' Offshore Service Centers

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    As more U.S. companies open and use offshore service-delivery centers amid the pandemic, assessment of important tax, intellectual property, cybersecurity and employment considerations can help mitigate regulatory risk and maximize the company's return on investment, says Sonia Baldia at Baker McKenzie.

  • What Firms Should Ask Before Hiring Attorneys From Gov't

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    In the final year of any presidential administration, there is an undeniable appetite on the part of large law firms for government-savvy legal talent, but firms need to first consider how they will actually utilize their new star hire, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • The Ethics Of Using Chatbots For Legal Services

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    Delegating legal work to robots involves several risks, including running afoul of statutes dictating unauthorized practice of law, but with the right precautions, law firms can lawfully employ artificially intelligent chatbots that can imitate human conversations, say attorneys at Haynes and Boone.

  • Opinion

    ABA Must Seize Opportunity To Respond To Bar Exam Chaos

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    The challenges of administering bar exams this year have put the future of the profession in jeopardy, but the American Bar Association at its ongoing annual meeting can adopt a resolution that would urge jurisdictions to take emergency actions with respect to licensure of new attorneys, says Nicholas Allard, former president of Brooklyn Law School.

  • NLRB Ruling Corrects Overbroad Abusive Conduct Standard

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent ruling that employees' abusive language and conduct are not protected under federal law in General Motors rectifies an overly expansive standard and provides employers predictable jurisprudence to implement nondiscriminatory corrective action, say Amber Rogers and Gary Enis at Hunton.

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