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Transportation

  • June 14, 2019

    American Airlines Wins Temporary Block On Work Slowdown

    A Texas federal judge on Friday approved a request by American Airlines to block mechanics unions from engaging in "any form of interference" with the airlines' operations while it continues its lawsuit alleging the unions are using illegal work "slowdowns" to gain leverage in contract negotiations.

  • June 14, 2019

    NYC Uber Rules Aren't A Cure-All For Driver, Traffic Woes

    New York City’s strict limitations on the growth of Uber, Lyft and other app-based ride-hailing services are aimed at increasing drivers’ earning potential and cutting traffic congestion, but the mixed-bag approach to leveling the competition between tech-based companies and traditional taxicabs may blow back on consumers, experts say.

  • June 14, 2019

    Jury Convicts Former FAA Safety Officer In Bribery Scheme

    A former Federal Aviation Administration safety inspector is guilty of taking part in a bribery and fraud scheme, in which he helped a Miami aviation repair company skirt safety regulations in exchange for $150,000 and other gifts, a federal jury found Thursday.

  • June 14, 2019

    AIG Owed $3.3M For Faulty Truck Parts Deal, 8th Circ. Says

    Two AIG primary insurers can recoup a total of $3.3 million they paid to settle a product liability suit against Donaldson Co. Inc. over allegedly faulty air-intake ducts for trucks, the Eighth Circuit affirmed on Friday, finding that a lower court properly interpreted key terms in the insurers' policies.

  • June 14, 2019

    7th Circ. Says Airline Privacy Fights Must Be Arbitrated

    Disputes over whether Southwest Airlines Co. and United Airlines Inc. violated Illinois law when they used timekeeping systems requiring workers to clock in and out with their fingerprints must be settled by an adjustment board, because their unions may have consented to the practice on the employees' collective behalf, the Seventh Circuit held Wednesday.

  • June 14, 2019

    EU Probing €8.7B Tunnel Project's Financing After Appeal

    Europe's competition enforcer launched an in-depth investigation Friday into public financing for a planned €8.7 billion ($9.8 billion) rail and road tunnel linking German and Danish islands after a court ordered a closer look to see if it constitutes illegal state aid.

  • June 14, 2019

    Sens. Seek To Shine Light On RFS Small Refiner Waivers

    A bipartisan pair of corn-state senators on Friday introduced legislation they claim will boost transparency over Renewable Fuel Standard exemptions handed out to small refiners by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a practice that biofuel producers are increasingly fighting in court.

  • June 14, 2019

    Helicopter Leasing Co. Calls Ch. 11 Auction NDA Suit Baseless

    A helicopter leasing company is asking a New York bankruptcy court to dismiss claims by asset manager Macquarie Group that it violated a non-disclosure agreement in the auction of bankrupt Waypoint Leasing's chopper fleet, calling the suit a baseless "fishing expedition."

  • June 14, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Questions Handling Of Dormant Duty Review

    The Federal Circuit ruled Friday that the U.S. Department of Commerce has the authority to restart discontinued duty reviews, but questioned the agency's decision to impose a high anti-dumping duty on a company for not cooperating with a probe that resumed years after it had been halted.

  • June 14, 2019

    DC Circ. Says FERC Must Explain Pipeline Rate Policy Shift

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday wiped out the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's rejection of challenges from airlines and refiners to transportation rate increases charged by a Kinder Morgan unit's liquids pipeline, saying the agency failed to explain why it changed its long-standing policy for reviewing such rate challenges.

  • June 13, 2019

    Judge OKs Lenders' $231M Deal In GM Clawback Suit

    A group of lenders led by JPMorgan will pay $231 million to creditors of General Motors' predecessor to resolve claims stemming from a simple mistake made by a Mayer Brown paralegal years ago, in a deal approved Thursday by a New York bankruptcy court.

  • June 13, 2019

    Conservatives Urge FCC To Open 5.9 GHz Band For Wi-Fi

    Seventeen conservative organizations and think tanks told the Federal Communications Commission on Thursday that it should move ahead with plans to open up a band long dedicated to an underused auto-safety technology, saying it could instead be used for Wi-Fi.

  • June 13, 2019

    Parker McCay Ducks Malpractice Suit From NJ Concessionaire

    A New Jersey state appellate court on Thursday refused to revive a concession stand business' malpractice action against Parker McCay PA, finding the company failed to establish that the firm misrepresented the terms of a settlement with New Jersey Transit over a proposed relocation to a new Atlantic City bus terminal.

  • June 13, 2019

    State Dept. Not Forced To Turn Over Climate Change Report

    An environmental advocacy group can't force the U.S. Department of State to make public two reports that disclose the government's efforts to combat climate change, after a D.C. federal judge said a United Nations treaty doesn't force the government to publish them.

  • June 13, 2019

    US Says Expedia, Others Violated Sanctions With Cuban Trips

    Three travel companies, including Expedia, have settled allegations that they helped tourists travel to Cuba or arranged trips for Cuban nationals five to eight years ago in violation of ongoing U.S. sanctions, the U.S. Treasury Department announced Thursday.

  • June 13, 2019

    KKR Sells Copper Foil Co. To South Korean Group For $1B

    KKR has inked a deal to sell KCF Technologies to an affiliate of South Korean conglomerate SK Group for 1.2 trillion South Korean won ($1 billion), the private equity company said in a statement released Thursday.

  • June 13, 2019

    Hyundai Using ITC To Undermine Trial Court, Parts Co. Says

    Direct Technologies International Inc. has urged a North Carolina federal court to enjoin Hyundai Motor America Inc. from asking the International Trade Commission to block DTI's imports, saying the auto giant is undermining litigation underway in district court.

  • June 13, 2019

    Eberspacher To Pay $1.9M Over Auto Parts Price-Fixing

    German car-parts maker Eberspacher agreed to pay almost $1.9 million to settle a class action in Michigan federal court over allegations that it has conspired to fix prices for a range of car parts sold to two U.S. automotive supply dealers.

  • June 13, 2019

    Watchdog Probes EPA's Actions On Minn. Copper Mine

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's internal watchdog said Thursday it will audit the agency's permitting process for a planned $1 billion copper and nickel mine in Minnesota to find out whether it complied with Clean Water Act requirements.

  • June 13, 2019

    7th Circ. Won't Reopen Obese Transit Worker's Bias Suit

    The Seventh Circuit rebuffed a former Chicago Transit Authority employee's quest to revive his Americans with Disabilities Act lawsuit claiming he was fired for his obesity, saying he failed to show that his condition met the anti-discrimination statute's definition of a disability.

  • June 13, 2019

    NJDOT Dodges Historical Society’s Home Demolition Suit

    A New Jersey federal judge has ruled that the state did not waive Eleventh Amendment sovereign immunity to two state law tort claims in a suit over the demolition of a Revolutionary War-era property for a highway construction project.

  • June 13, 2019

    Chicago Is 'Towing Without Telling,' Driver's Suit Says

    A proposed class of drivers has accused the city of Chicago of illegally "towing without telling," allegedly failing to give owners of abandoned and towed vehicles proper notice before selling them to third parties.

  • June 13, 2019

    Uber Nears Deal With Hundreds Of Cab Cos. Ahead Of Trial

    Hundreds of Boston-area taxi companies have agreed in principle to settle six out of seven consolidated lawsuits against Uber alleging unfair pricing practices ahead of a trial scheduled to begin next month, according to a joint filing in Massachusetts federal court late Wednesday.

  • June 12, 2019

    FTC Orders Auto Dealer Software Co. To Boost Data Security

    The Federal Trade Commission built on recent efforts to make its data security enforcement orders stronger and more specific by announcing a settlement Wednesday with an auto dealer software provider whose allegedly lax data security led to a breach that exposed unencrypted personal information of about 12.5 million consumers.

  • June 12, 2019

    Skanska Signs $67M Contract For Boston Airport Project

    Construction company Skanska USA said Wednesday it has inked a $67 million contract with the Massachusetts Port Authority to build a canopy at Terminal C in Boston’s Logan International Airport, as the airport undergoes a major upgrade to accommodate increased passenger traffic.

Expert Analysis

  • LightYear Is FTC's Data Security Warning To B2B Companies

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    The Federal Trade Commission's data security settlement with LightYear Dealer Technologies is notable because the company does not market or sell products directly to consumers, and because the FTC made the eyebrow-raising claim that LightYear is a financial institution under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, say attorneys at ZwillGen.

  • Colo.'s New Oil And Gas Law Shifts Rulemaking Landscape

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    A new Colorado law dramatically changes the regulation of oil and gas development in the state. Oil and gas development opponents and proponents should prepare for years of complicated rulemaking and public comment opportunities at the Colorado agencies, say Zachary Fitzgerald and Ivan London of Bryan Cave.

  • How To Streamline Virtual Law Team Mass Tort Defense

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    A primary benefit of the virtual law team in mass tort litigation is creative collaboration. A "company case" approach is essential to breaking down the silos between team members, say attorneys at FaegreBD and Reed Smith.

  • What's Ahead For LGBTQ Rights Legislation

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    The U.S. House of Representatives recently passed the Equality Act to amend various civil rights laws for explicit inclusion of sexual orientation and gender identity as protected characteristics. However, critics have raised several concerns and the bill faces tougher odds in the Senate, say Jason Brown and Robert Quackenboss at Hunton.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.

  • Law Firms Can Do Better With Their Mentoring Programs

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    There are a few practical, proactive steps law firms can take to create a mentoring program that pays dividends — instead of creating a mediocre program that both parties see as an obligation, says Kate Sheikh of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • The Latest Developments In Criminal Cases Against Execs

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    This spring, there was some noteworthy news in white collar government investigations impacting executives, including the first successful prosecution in the opioid bribery scheme and the first criminal charges for failure to report under the Consumer Product Safety Act, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 'Rocket Docket' Justifies Its Name For 11th Straight Year

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    The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia “rocket docket” is still the fastest federal civil trial court in the country despite some recent trends causing its median time to trial to grow to 13.2 months, says Robert Tata of Hunton.

  • Class Action Takeaways From 9th Circ.'s New Hyundai Ruling

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    The Ninth Circuit's latest opinion in the Hyundai and Kia Fuel Economy Litigation addresses how class action settlements should be evaluated. But the importance of the decision goes beyond what it means for class settlements — it reaffirms core principles of litigated motions for class certification, says William Stern of Covington.

  • Should Consumer Data Privacy Laws Apply To The Gov't?

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    Although the California Consumer Privacy Act likely will be modified by several pending amendments, it appears that government entities will be exempt from its clutches. But governments are increasingly entering the business of utilizing consumer data, potentially causing interesting consumer privacy debates, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • 5 Key Issues In Acquiring Transportation Infrastructure Assets

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    There is a growing trend of governmental agencies contracting and leasing viable operating transportation infrastructure assets. Such opportunities for the private sector may exist in connection with any contemplated upgrade, extension or other modification of an asset that a governmental entity needs to finance, say José Morán and Juan Gonzalez of Baker McKenzie. 

  • Measuring The Value Of A Law Firm's Social Media Efforts

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    Most legal marketers struggle to show the return on investment of their social media efforts, but establishing and answering several key questions can help demonstrate exactly how social media programs contribute to a law firm's bottom line, say Guy Alvarez of Good2bSocial and communications consultant Tom Orewyler.

  • The Narrow Scope Of NLRB's Independent Contractor Memo

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    A recent memo from the National Labor Relations Board concluded that Uber drivers are independent contractors, but companies seeking to use independent contractors could face less favorable outcomes when similar facts are applied to the varying tests that are controlling in other contexts, says Corey Clay at Benesch Friedlander.

  • Top Insights From NLRB’s New Advice Opinions

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    The National Labor Relations Board’s Division of Advice recently issued 18 memos addressing issues such as independent contractor status and union dues. Although it might seem like reading tea leaves, it's possible to discern some patterns by looking at the decisions collectively, says Marc Antonetti of BakerHostetler.

  • How France's Consumer Protection Agency Is Targeting Cos.

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    France's market oversight authority recently reported that it carried out over half a million enforcement actions last year. Companies doing business in France must be aware of the agency's current priorities, particularly concerning internet sales and payment terms, says Sylvie Gallage-Alwis of Signature Litigation.