Transportation

  • December 13, 2019

    Cybercriminals Phished For Gov't Procurement Credentials

    Cybercriminals targeted the U.S. Departments of Energy, Commerce and Transportation as well as other federal agencies in a widespread campaign to steal login credentials from stakeholders in government procurement processes, security researchers say.

  • December 13, 2019

    Orbitz, Expedia Settle With Pa. AG Over Data Breach

    Pennsylvania said on Friday it has reached a $110,000 settlement with travel websites Orbitz and Expedia following an investigation by the state attorney general's office into a 2018 data breach.

  • December 13, 2019

    7th Circ. Says Helicopter And Gun Use In Rec Area Can Fly

    The National Park Service was within its legal authority to allow off-road motorcycle riding, dog training with guns and military helicopter training on federal land that was turned into a Wisconsin recreational area, the Seventh Circuit said Thursday.

  • December 13, 2019

    Texas Can't Ditch $5.2M Verdict Cut To $500K For Fatal Crash

    The Texas Department of Transportation can’t duck a $5.2 million verdict stemming from a fatal crash, which was later cut to a $500,000 award, after an appellate court on Friday said emails, testimony and photographs refute the agency's argument there was too little evidence to support the award.

  • December 13, 2019

    Michel Says Drive Shaft Ruling Puts All Patents In Jeopardy

    Former Federal Circuit Chief Judge Paul R. Michel is urging his old court to undo its decision to invalidate an American Axle & Manufacturing automobile drive shaft technology patent, saying it puts “seemingly every patent [in] eligibility jeopardy.”

  • December 13, 2019

    GIC Will Buy Logistics Portfolio From Apollo For $1.06B

    Singapore’s sovereign wealth fund GIC has reached a deal to buy a portfolio of Europe logistics properties from funds managed by Apollo Global Management for roughly €950 million ($1.06 billion), according to an announcement from GIC on Friday.

  • December 13, 2019

    Texas Justices Will Mull 'Intention' In Trucker Death Case

    The Texas Supreme Court will review a finding that a trucking company can be taken to court over an employee's death based on an “intentional act” exception to a rule that normally restricts the surviving family’s remedies to the workers’ compensation system, the court said Friday, after previously rejecting the case.

  • December 13, 2019

    Fuel Card Co. FleetCor Settles Stock-Drop Suit For $50M

    FleetCor Technologies Inc. has agreed to pay $50 million to resolve a securities suit in Georgia federal court from investors who claim the fuel-card company covered up its fraudulent overcharging of customers.

  • December 13, 2019

    Texas Justices Take Up Air Ambulance Reimbursement Fight

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear a dispute that asks it to determine whether the Airline Deregulation Act of 1978 preempts state laws governing how much an air carrier can charge for emergency medical transports of injured workers.

  • December 13, 2019

    Project Finance Roads Led To Clean Energy In 2019

    Investor dollars continue to flow into clean energy projects even as key tax credits approach their sunsets, while oil and gas companies have difficulty raising cash for projects. Here, Law360 looks at five energy project finance trends that stood out to attorneys in 2019.

  • December 13, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen fruit producers team up with their insurers to sue Swiss shipping giant MSC Mediterranean, a £1.5 billion penthouse dispute involving the former emir of Qatar spill over into a libel fight, and lenders like NatWest, HSBC and American Express get roped into a product liability case involving eye care specialists. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • December 12, 2019

    States To Accelerate Switch To Zero Emission Trucks, Buses

    California, Massachusetts, New Jersey, the District of Columbia and five other states on Thursday announced their intention to speed up the transition from fossil fuel-based trucks and buses to zero emission vehicles.

  • December 12, 2019

    Congress' Promises To Renew Tax Extenders Could Wear Thin

    If Congress fails to revive dozens of expired tax incentives known as extenders before leaving Washington, D.C., next week, businesses could begin to question whether lawmakers can keep their promises to retroactively renew the incentives in the future.

  • December 12, 2019

    New York Court Certifies Appeal In GM Ignition Switch Claims

    The multibillion-dollar question of whether General Motors owes car owners for lowering the value of their vehicles by revealing a deadly defect is headed to the Second Circuit, after the New York federal judge overseeing a sprawling multidistrict litigation against the auto giant agreed to fast-track the issue.

  • December 12, 2019

    J-B Weld Must Recall Muffler Sealants Amid TM Fight

    Epoxy maker J-B Weld must pull its muffler sealant products from stores after a Connecticut federal judge on Thursday found it “exceedingly lame” that the company tried to fend off a rival’s trademark allegations by claiming its use of a near-identical name was a coincidence.

  • December 12, 2019

    Trucking Co. To Pay $18M Over Employee's Fatal Roof Fall

    A Texas jury on Wednesday awarded $18 million — including $10 million in punitive damages — to the widow of a trucker and handyman who died after falling through a rotting roof where his employer had asked him to replace translucent skylight panels.

  • December 12, 2019

    Labaton Will Lead Midstream Co. Investors' Take-Private Suit

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday appointed Labaton Sucharow LLP lead counsel for a proposed class of shareholders who claim they lost out when a midstream energy company was taken private after the company's stock price was allegedly pushed down on purpose.

  • December 12, 2019

    9th Circ. Affirms Ex-Mercedes Worker's $5M Disability Verdict

    The Ninth Circuit affirmed a nearly $5 million jury verdict against Mercedes-Benz of Seattle for firing a finance director who received a prosthetic voice box after undergoing surgery for throat cancer, rejecting the dealership's claim it deserved a new trial because the award was overly punitive.

  • December 12, 2019

    FCC Advances Plan To Split Up Auto Safety Spectrum

    The Federal Communications Commission unanimously voted Thursday to divvy up a spectrum band reserved for transportation safety uses, despite warnings from lawmakers and the auto industry that the plan would endanger drivers.

  • December 12, 2019

    Nokia Cell Tech Conspiracy Suit Moves To Texas

    A car parts supplier's suit accusing Nokia and other technology companies of inflating licensing rates for cellular connectivity technology will be moved to Texas after a California federal judge found Wednesday that most of the alleged conspiracy occurred in the Lone Star State.

  • December 12, 2019

    Germany Fines Steel Makers $718M For Price-Fixing

    Germany’s antitrust authority has levied fines totaling €646 million ($718 million) against Thyssenkrupp and two other steel manufacturers for colluding on price surcharges for steel products used in bridges, ships, boilers and pipelines.

  • December 12, 2019

    Tesla's 3rd General Counsel In A Year Leaves Automaker

    In yet another general counsel shakeup this year, Tesla Inc.'s top lawyer and a longtime insider has left the electric automaker after just 10 months in the role, moving on to lead the legal team at an artificial intelligence company, the startup announced Thursday.

  • December 12, 2019

    Postmates Fires Back At Couriers' Arbitration Fee Demands

    Postmates told a California federal judge Wednesday that it shouldn’t have to cover $10 million in arbitration fees for over 5,200 couriers alleging they were misclassified as independent contractors and shorted on wages, saying the couriers are the ones holding up the process.

  • December 11, 2019

    Ford Aware Of PowerShift Issues Before 2014 Lease, Jury Told

    A former Ford engineer told a California federal jury Wednesday that the carmaker knew its PowerShift transmission had safety issues long before a Los Angeles couple leased a 2014 Ford Focus with shuddering and stalling problems.

  • December 11, 2019

    Waypoint Administrator Says Lenders Were Overpaid By $4M

    The plan administrator for bankrupt helicopter leasing firm Waypoint Leasing has filed an adversary action in a New York bankruptcy court against five banks he claims are refusing to repay $4.1 million they received from the estate due to an accounting error.

Expert Analysis

  • NJ Benefits Bill May Deter Business With Contractors

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    As the Portable Benefits Act for Independent Contractors makes its way through the New Jersey Legislature, businesses will need to determine whether the new costs of working with contractors will be worth continuing to do business in the state, say attorneys at Jackson Lewis.

  • State Net

    2020 Will Be A Year Of Decision For States

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    The coming year will be politically crucial for the states, with most choosing legislatures that in 2021 will redistrict congressional and legislative seats on the basis of the 2020 census, says Lou Cannon of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • What UK Ruling On Claims Agencies Could Mean For Airlines

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    A U.K. Supreme Court ruling in a suit between law firm Bott & Co. and Ryanair over the use of third parties in passenger disputes could embolden claims agencies and increase the administrative burden on airlines in the handling of flight compensation regulation claims, says James Jordan of Holman Fenwick.

  • Strategies To Maintain Privilege In Crisis Response Scenarios

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    In several recent cases, courts have overridden claims that attorney-client privilege applies to communications with public relations firms in connection with litigation and to documents generated in internal investigations, but businesses can use several best practices to avoid the potential risk of waiving privilege, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • How To Ward Off Nonclient Suits Over Lawyers' Speech

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    Because lawyers are often sued by nonclients based on public statements they have made, lawyers should be trained to avoid potentially actionable statements when speaking and writing, and they should also understand the overarching defenses against such lawsuits, says Matthew O’Hara at Freeborn & Peters.

  • Product Liability Claims Can Be A Global Threat To Cos.

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    When allegations of product risks related to health, safety or the environment spread from one jurisdiction to countries around the world, they can lead to both policy responses and mass litigation that can jeopardize companies' business models, says Sylvie Gallage-Alwis of Signature Litigation.

  • UK Restructuring Proceedings May Attract More Foreign Cos.

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    The English High Court recently sanctioned two schemes of arrangement integral to the restructure of U.S.-headquartered Syncreon International Group. This could be the start of a new trend advancing the attractiveness of English restructuring proceedings to foreign corporates, say attorneys at Goodwin.

  • State Net

    What State Lawmakers Will Be Focused On In 2020

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    A number of issues are expected to figure prominently on state legislative agendas in the coming year, including subjects as diverse as election reform, 5G technology, online marketplaces and insurance fraud, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • The Outlook For Autonomous Vehicles In The UK And US

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    As both the U.K. and U.S. governments continue to develop regulatory frameworks for autonomous vehicles, manufacturers can take certain steps to avoid litigation and manage risk, say attorneys at FaegreBD.

  • What Is A 'Reasonably Useful Form' For Production Of ESI?

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    While federal rules require production of electronically stored information in its native format or a "reasonably useful form," recent court rulings offer guidance on avoiding production of ESI in its native format when it would be unduly burdensome, say Matthew Hamilton and Donna Fisher at Pepper Hamilton.

  • 4 Ways Tribal Nations Can Leverage Opportunity Zones

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    The ecosystem of both capital and support services rapidly developing around opportunity zone investment provides tribal nations with an unparalleled opportunity to attract new investors by recasting and rebranding private economic development opportunities, says Bo Kemp at FaegreBD.

  • Innovative Collaborations Require Antitrust Flexibility

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    Joint initiatives by companies active in the same industry are much needed to tackle major challenges like sustainability and digital transformation, but such partnerships may require special exemptions from international antitrust authorities, says Tilman Kuhn of White & Case.

  • Congress, DOT Paving The Way For Autonomous Vehicles

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    Congressional committees' emerging consensus on a bill regulating autonomous vehicles, and U.S. Department of Transportation action to facilitate broader AV testing and deployment, suggest growing momentum for federal AV legislation that will provide certainty for the industry, say attorneys at Akin Gump.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: It's Nothing Personal

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    A recent ruling on personal jurisdiction from the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation makes clear that parties should not be able to utilize the MDL process as an end-run around well-established due process considerations, says Alan Rothman of Arnold & Porter.

  • Patent Decision Highlights Cross-Appeal Considerations

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    The Federal Circuit's recent decision in IPR Licensing overruled precedent to hold that the cross-appeal rule is not jurisdictional, demonstrating the complexity of this seemingly simple rule and its various applications within the circuit courts, says Michael Soyfer at Quinn Emanuel.