Trials

  • June 11, 2024

    Berkshire Unit Wants $20M Antitrust Loss Tossed Or New Trial

    A Berkshire Hathaway-owned construction supplier asked a Colorado federal judge Monday to reverse its $20 million jury trial loss to a smaller rival in the insulation material business, arguing that the damages are untethered to the alleged conduct, especially under a Tenth Circuit decision reviving the antitrust lawsuit.

  • June 11, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Reinstates Parts Of Blood Analyzer Secrets Verdict

    The Federal Circuit decided Tuesday that a Rhode Island jury was right to find that an Italian company's blood analyzer computer code was stolen by a U.S. rival, but another jury will have to determine any damages.

  • June 11, 2024

    9th Circ. Judge On Theranos Appeal: 'Good Story' For Holmes

    Two Ninth Circuit judges on a three-judge panel expressed concerns Tuesday that the district judge presiding over convicted former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes' criminal trial erred by allowing a layperson witness to offer expert testimony at trial, with one judge saying, "There's a pretty good story here for Ms. Holmes."

  • June 11, 2024

    2025 Trial Set For Ex-Conn. Official Charged In Kickback Scheme

    A Feb. 6 jury selection date has been set in a federal corruption case accusing a former Connecticut state budget official, lawmaker and beleaguered attorney of extortion and bribery in connection with millions in school finance projects.

  • June 11, 2024

    Poor Monitoring Killed Anesthesia Patient, Conn. Jury Hears

    An anesthesiology group should be held liable for a patient's death because a doctor and nurse failed to adequately monitor the woman's vital signs through multiple doses of the anesthetic propofol, causing her blood oxygen levels to drop and her heart to stop, a Connecticut jury heard Tuesday morning.

  • June 11, 2024

    Baldwin Urges Court To Block 'Rust' Armorer's Testimony

    Alec Baldwin's legal team has urged a New Mexico state judge to prevent prosecutors from calling a convicted "Rust" film armorer to testify against the actor-producer during his upcoming involuntary manslaughter trial in the on-set shooting death of a cinematographer.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-Union Leader Seeks Sentencing Delay Ahead Of Retrial

    Former International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98 business manager John Dougherty has asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to postpone his sentencing for his bribery and embezzlement convictions, pointing to the possibility of the government retrying him on extortion charges following an April mistrial in that case.

  • June 11, 2024

    Retrial Begins In NJ Fraud Case Over COVID Test Kit Deal  

    The painstaking process of jury selection got underway Tuesday in the retrial of a securities fraud case that ended with a dramatic mistrial after a juror announced in open court that he disagreed with the guilty verdict that had just been delivered by the jury forewoman.

  • June 11, 2024

    Feds Want 10 Years For Ex-Chicago Alderman Burke

    Federal prosecutors asked an Illinois federal judge Monday to send former Chicago Alderman Ed Burke to prison for 10 years for "brazenly and boldly" using his official position to steer tax business to his law firm, while Burke requested a sentence of probation, bolstered by letters of support from prominent attorneys and retired judges.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-DraftKings Exec Seeks Fast Trial To Test Noncompete Law

    A former DraftKings executive wants a snap trial to unwind a noncompete blocking him from work at sports-betting rival Fanatics, calling the fiercely litigated, bicoastal dispute a "test case" for California's recent law reinforcing a ban on restrictive covenants.

  • June 11, 2024

    Spat Over Texas Trial, Vacation Plans Ends With New Date

    A Texas appeals court has dismissed a tech company's mandamus petition stating that a Harris County court scheduled a trial in its case despite several attorney vacation letters after the parties said the trial court moved the date.

  • June 11, 2024

    Archegos Boss Got Angry Over Bathroom Breaks, Jury Told

    A former protégé of Archegos founder Bill Hwang told the Manhattan federal jury hearing the $36 billion market distortion case against Hwang on Tuesday that his former boss was so hands-on that he would get mad when workers used the bathroom.

  • June 11, 2024

    Atty, Broker Look To Dismantle Guilty Verdicts In Tax Case

    A St. Louis attorney convicted alongside his daughter and a North Carolina insurance agent asked Tuesday to be acquitted for their roles in a $4 million tax fraud scheme, arguing in part that the supposedly false statements they made on tax returns were actually true.

  • June 11, 2024

    Hunter Biden Found Guilty Of Federal Gun Charges

    President Joe Biden's son Hunter Biden was found guilty of three felony gun charges by a federal jury in Wilmington, Delaware, on Tuesday.

  • June 10, 2024

    Trump Can't Nix 9 Classified Doc Charges, But Wins Trim

    The Florida federal judge overseeing the classified documents case against Donald Trump on Monday refused to throw out nine counts challenged by the former president, yet she did agree to strike from the indictment allegations that Trump at one point shared a classified map at a golf course.

  • June 10, 2024

    Microsoft Wants $242M IP Verdict Axed Or Cut To $1.9M

    Microsoft has urged a Delaware federal judge to toss a $242 million jury verdict that found Microsoft's virtual assistant Cortana infringed a patent originally issued to a company that developed Apple's Siri software, arguing infringement wasn't proven and the "grossly inflated" award should at least be cut to $1.95 million.

  • June 10, 2024

    Debevoise Aims To Sink Cognizant Bribery Trial Subpoena

    Debevoise & Plimpton LLP urged a New Jersey federal judge Monday to quash defendants' trial subpoena that would require a Debevoise partner to testify in an upcoming September criminal bribery trial against ex-Cognizant Technology Solutions's chief legal officer and another former executive, arguing that the testimony is subject to attorney-client privilege.

  • June 10, 2024

    NYC Probation Officer Interviews Trump Ahead Of Sentence

    A New York City probation officer questioned Donald Trump in a remote video interview on Monday, a month before the former president is slated to be sentenced in the wake of his felony conviction in the Manhattan district attorney's hush money case.

  • June 10, 2024

    Navy Liable In 'Take-Home' Asbestos Death, Trial Judge Told

    The U.S. Navy can't avoid a $12 million wrongful death suit by arguing asbestos safeguards were only advisory at a Washington state shipyard in the 1970s, counsel to the family of a service member's deceased spouse said Monday at the start of a bench trial.

  • June 10, 2024

    Fox Views NFL Sunday Ticket As 'Existential' Threat, Jury Told

    A retired executive with Fox Sports testified Monday in a trial over multibillion-dollar antitrust claims brought against the NFL by Sunday Ticket subscribers that his network asked the league to agree to specific Sunday Ticket pricing because it viewed the DirecTV television package as an "existential" threat.

  • June 10, 2024

    Biz Defends $525M Data Storage Patent Win Against Amazon

    Efforts by Amazon to dislodge a $525 million jury verdict are too late and amount to sour grapes, a small Chicago software company that won the amount has told an Illinois federal court.

  • June 10, 2024

    Student Debt Elimination Service Was A 'Lie,' Fla. Jurors Told

    A service offered by a Boca Raton, Florida, law firm to eliminate private student loan debt in exchange for a flat fee turned out to be a lie and left clients defrauded out of tens of thousands of dollars, a Florida federal jury was told Monday.

  • June 10, 2024

    Prosecutors Tell Jury To Ignore Hunter Biden's 'Stories'

    Jury deliberations in Hunter Biden's trial on felony gun charges will continue Tuesday at a federal courthouse in Wilmington, Delaware, after a five-day trial ended Monday afternoon with Biden's attorney imploring jurors to avoid "conjecture and suspicion" and prosecutors urging them not to fall for "fictional stories."

  • June 10, 2024

    Chinese Dissident's Banker Lied About Accounts, Jury Hears

    The former head of banking for Miles Guo, the prominent Chinese dissident also known as Ho Wan Kwok, testified in Manhattan federal court Monday that he lied to financial institutions about a number of investment entities that are now the subject of $1 billion fraud charges.

  • June 10, 2024

    YSL Atty Jailed For Contempt Ruling Over 'Sacrosanct' Convo

    The defense counsel for Atlanta rapper Young Thug was ordered to spend the next 10 weekends in jail after being held in contempt Monday afternoon for refusing to divulge how the attorney learned of a purported conversation behind closed doors between prosecutors, a witness and the judge presiding over the case.

Expert Analysis

  • 2nd Circ. Adviser Liability Ruling May Shape SEC Enforcement

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission v. Rashid, applying basic negligence principles to reverse a finding of investment adviser liability, provides a road map for future fraud enforcement proceedings, says Elisha Kobre at Bradley Arant.

  • In Bribery Case, High Court's Past Is Probably Prologue

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    The U.S. Supreme Court will soon hear oral arguments in Snyder v. U.S. on the issue of whether federal law criminalizes gratuities that are not tied to an explicit quid pro quo, and precedent strongly indicates the court will limit an expansive reading of the bribery statute, say attorneys Sami Azhari and Don Davidson.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Has Lessons For Waiving Jury Trials

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    The California Supreme Court’s recent decision in TriCoast Builders v. Fonnegra, denying relief to a contractor that had waived its right to a jury trial, shows that litigants should always post jury fees as soon as possible, and seek writ review if the court denies relief from a waiver, say Steven Fleischman and Nicolas Sonnenburg at Horvitz & Levy.

  • Opinion

    DOJ Press Office Is Not Fulfilling Its Stated Mission

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    The U.S. Department of Justice Office of Public Affairs’ apparent practice of issuing press releases when someone is indicted or convicted, but not when a defendant prevails, undermines its stated mission to disseminate “current, complete and accurate” information, and has negative real-world ramifications, says Sara Kropf at Kropf Moseley.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Securing A Common Understanding Of Language Used At Trial

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    Witness examinations in the Georgia election interference case against former President Donald Trump illustrate the importance of building a common understanding of words and phrases and examples as a fact-finding tool at trial, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • NY Bond, Enforcement Options As Trump Judgment Looms

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    In light of former President Donald Trump's court filing this week indicating that he can't secure a bond for the New York attorney general's nearly $465 million judgment against him, Neil Pedersen of Pedersen & Sons Surety Bond Agency and Adam Pollock of Pollock Cohen explore New York state judgment enforcement options and the mechanics of securing and collateralizing an appellate bond.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • 3 Litigation Strategies To Combat 'Safetyism'

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    Amid the rise of safetyism — the idea that every person should be free from the risk of harm or discomfort — among jurors and even judges, defense counsel can mount several tactics from the very start of litigation to counteract these views and blunt the potential for jackpot damages, says Ann Marie Duffy at Hollingsworth.

  • Risks Of Nonmutual Offensive Collateral Estoppel In MDLs

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    After the Supreme Court declined to review the Sixth Circuit's ruling in the E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. personal injury litigation, nonmutual offensive collateral estoppel could show up in more MDLs, and transform the loss of a single MDL bellwether trial into a de facto classwide decision that binds thousands of other MDL cases, say Chantale Fiebig and Luke Sullivan at Weil Gotshal.

  • Infringement Policy Lessons From 4th Circ. Sony Music Ruling

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    The Fourth Circuit's recent decision in Sony Music v. Cox Communications, which in part held that the internet service provider was liable for contributing to music copyright infringement, highlights the importance of reasonable policies to terminate repeat infringers, and provides guidance for litigating claims of secondary liability, say Benjamin Marks and Alexandra Blankman at Weil.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

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