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Trials

  • June 14, 2019

    J&J Presses Expert On 'Opioid Mafia' Claim In Okla. Trial

    A Johnson & Johnson attorney on Friday interrogated an opioid policy expert on his claim that a lobbying group J&J belonged to, the Pain Care Forum, was the “opioid mafia,” questioning whether the group’s other members, including nursing associations and the American Cancer Society, were all under opioid makers’ spell.

  • June 14, 2019

    GSK Calls $90M Inhaler IP Damages 'Wildly Inflated'

    Vectura Ltd. won an $89.7 million patent infringement verdict against GlaxoSmithKline LLC by relying on flawed tests and inflating damages, GSK has told a Delaware federal judge in hopes of undoing its loss.

  • June 14, 2019

    $50M Trade Secrets Claim Fizzles Into $290K Jury Award

    A Texas federal jury on Friday awarded a digital marketing firm about $290,000 for an ex-worker's violation of a noncompete agreement, but rejected the company's $50 million claim a rival firm stole confidential information, training materials and employees.

  • June 14, 2019

    Jury Convicts Former FAA Safety Officer In Bribery Scheme

    A former Federal Aviation Administration safety inspector is guilty of taking part in a bribery and fraud scheme, in which he helped a Miami aviation repair company skirt safety regulations in exchange for $150,000 and other gifts, a federal jury found Thursday.

  • June 14, 2019

    RJ Reynolds Not On Hook For $4M Engle Case Legal Tab

    R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. won't have to pay an attorney fees award of nearly $4 million after a Florida appeals court found Friday that when weighing the request from a smoker's widower, the trial court improperly included costs related to four expert witnesses who did not testify.

  • June 14, 2019

    Texas Justices Pass On DLA's $1.3M Malpractice Verdict

    The Texas Supreme Court declined Friday to take up DLA Piper’s appeal of a $1.29 million jury verdict in favor of an Australian financier who alleged bad advice from the firm caused him to lose retirement funds.

  • June 13, 2019

    Okla. Opioid Expert Is Motivated By Money, J&J Tells Judge

    A Johnson & Johnson attorney went on the offensive Thursday against an expert who called the drugmaker "the kingpin" behind the country's opioid crisis, telling the judge overseeing the landmark Oklahoma trial that the expert's opinions had been paid for just like the doctors the expert had accused of pushing opioids at J&J's behest.

  • June 13, 2019

    VidAngel Undermined Studios' Licensing Deals, Jury Told

    Walt Disney and other Hollywood heavyweights make hundreds of millions of dollars in licensing deals with streaming services like Netflix and Hulu, and family-friendly service VidAngel undermined those partnerships when it pirated films from DVDs to stream to its customers, a California federal jury heard Thursday.

  • June 13, 2019

    Photo Co. Asks High Court To Look At Zillow Copyright Fight

    A real estate photo company asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday to hear its appeal of a Ninth Circuit decision that upended a $4 million copyright infringement award against the Zillow Group, saying the ruling highlighted a circuit split on willful infringement that the high court should clear up.

  • June 13, 2019

    11th Circ. Mulls Whether Class Invited Trial Court 'Error'

    The Eleventh Circuit questioned Thursday if a class of Florida condo-hotel unit owners invited a purported error by a trial court by pushing for a jury to determine whether they were charged excessive fees and then changed their tune when the decision didn't go their way.

  • June 13, 2019

    Chamber, Drugmakers Back AbbVie In $448M FTC Fine Appeal

    Drugmakers and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have urged the Third Circuit to overturn a ruling that slammed AndroGel maker AbbVie with $448 million in penalties for bringing “sham” patent suits to slow down generic competitors, arguing that the Pennsylvania federal judge on the case made it harder to file legitimate patent defenses.

  • June 13, 2019

    Jack In The Box To Fight $15M Verdict In Wrongful Firing Suit

    Jack in the Box Inc. told investors Thursday that it "strongly disagrees" with a California state jury's $15.4 million verdict against it in a wrongful employee termination suit, asserting that it is prepared to appeal the verdict.

  • June 13, 2019

    J&J Loses Bid To Keep Talc Cancer Case Out Of Philly

    A Pennsylvania woman alleging she developed ovarian cancer from a Johnson & Johnson talcum powder product is looking forward to bringing her case to trial before a state court in Philadelphia after a federal judge ruled he did not have jurisdiction over the claims, her attorney said Thursday.

  • June 13, 2019

    Ex-Chipotle Worker Gets New Trial On Disability Claim

    A California federal judge on Wednesday granted a former Chipotle Mexican Grill assistant store manager a new trial on allegations that the restaurant chain failed to engage in an interactive process before firing her after she had a miscarriage, finding that an incomplete jury instruction likely impacted the jury’s verdict against her.

  • June 13, 2019

    Crooked Fund CEO Demoted Me, Finance Pro Tells Jury

    A career finance pro told Manhattan jurors Thursday that the CEO of Premium Point Investments became angry and demoted him when he complained about what he called rampant overvaluing of mortgage-debt assets at the now-bankrupt hedge fund.

  • June 13, 2019

    Uber Nears Deal With Hundreds Of Cab Cos. Ahead Of Trial

    Hundreds of Boston-area taxi companies have agreed in principle to settle six out of seven consolidated lawsuits against Uber alleging unfair pricing practices ahead of a trial scheduled to begin next month, according to a joint filing in Massachusetts federal court late Wednesday.

  • June 12, 2019

    J&J Pushed Opioids Like Drug Dealer, Doctor Tells Trial Judge

    The landmark trial between the state of Oklahoma and Johnson & Johnson took a testy turn Wednesday when a doctor testifying on behalf of the state compared the company's promotional tactics to that of a street-corner drug dealer, prompting the judge to strike the testimony after a heated objection from J&J.

  • June 12, 2019

    Ga. Court OKs Jury Selection Bias Ruling, $2M Injury Verdict

    A Georgia appellate panel on Wednesday upheld a $2 million jury verdict in a suit accusing a go-kart racing center of causing a black woman's injuries, saying the judge did not err by holding that prospective black jurors were improperly struck by the center based on their race.

  • June 12, 2019

    Fla. Court Nixes Amputee’s $15.6M Delayed Treatment Win

    A Florida appellate court on Wednesday threw out a $15.6 million verdict and ordered a new trial in a suit accusing a doctor of negligently delaying treatment and causing a women to lose nine of her toes, finding that the jury received erroneous instructions.

  • June 12, 2019

    No Title VII Training Despite Victim's Jury Win, 11th Circ. Says

    The Eleventh Circuit ruled Wednesday that an outsourcing company doesn't have to offer sexual harassment training after losing at trial against a former employee claiming the company turned a blind eye to her sexual harassment, saying the training wouldn't benefit her as she no longer works for the company.

  • June 12, 2019

    Insurer Sues NJ Firm For Mishandling $9M Severed Leg Case

    An insurer slapped Florio Perrucci on Wednesday with a malpractice suit in New Jersey federal court alleging its attorneys botched their defense of state agencies in litigation over a multivehicle collision that cost a woman her leg, leading to a $9 million judgment and ultimately a $3.5 million settlement.

  • June 12, 2019

    Insurer Dodges Contract-Breach Claim In $45M Coverage Suit

    A Florida federal judge has erased a breach-of-contract claim against insurer Allied World in a suit by a construction company policyholder facing a $45 million underlying verdict over a deadly crash, leaving another claim over punitive damages coverage still to be decided.

  • June 12, 2019

    Pa. Resort Hit With $2.5M Verdict For Snowboarder's Injury

    A Pennsylvania federal jury on Wednesday awarded $2.5 million to a snowboarder who sued a ski resort after he broke his leg on a closed slope, which he claimed was not properly marked as off-limits.

  • June 12, 2019

    Jailed $2B Loan Scammer Doubles Down On Tribal Defense

    Former racing driver Scott Tucker told the Second Circuit on Wednesday his conviction for running a $2 billion criminal payday loan empire is flawed, returning to a tribal sovereignty defense that failed at trial even as an appellate judge called the evidence against him “overwhelming.”

  • June 12, 2019

    Atty Rips 'Tinker Tailor' Theories Over Yukos Assets Sale

    An attorney representing an investor accused of conspiring with Russian state oil company Rosneft to rig an auction for parts of Yukos Oil said at a London trial on Wednesday that the allegations are founded on conspiracy theories more suited to a John le Carré spy thriller. 

Expert Analysis

  • How To Streamline Virtual Law Team Mass Tort Defense

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    A primary benefit of the virtual law team in mass tort litigation is creative collaboration. A "company case" approach is essential to breaking down the silos between team members, say attorneys at FaegreBD and Reed Smith.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.

  • Law Firms Can Do Better With Their Mentoring Programs

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    There are a few practical, proactive steps law firms can take to create a mentoring program that pays dividends — instead of creating a mediocre program that both parties see as an obligation, says Kate Sheikh of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • The Latest Developments In Criminal Cases Against Execs

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    This spring, there was some noteworthy news in white collar government investigations impacting executives, including the first successful prosecution in the opioid bribery scheme and the first criminal charges for failure to report under the Consumer Product Safety Act, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 'Rocket Docket' Justifies Its Name For 11th Straight Year

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    The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia “rocket docket” is still the fastest federal civil trial court in the country despite some recent trends causing its median time to trial to grow to 13.2 months, says Robert Tata of Hunton.

  • Opinion

    FARA Enforcement Is No Slam-Dunk For Prosecutors

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    What support is there for the government’s recent theories of criminal liability under the Foreign Agents Registration Act? There are two possibilities, neither of which stands up to scrutiny, says Jay Nanavati of Kostelanetz & Fink.

  • Why Bellwethers Matter In The Opioid MDL

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    The prescription opioid multidistrict litigation pending before U.S. District Judge Dan Polster in Ohio demonstrates both how hard selecting bellwethers is, and why they must be selected so carefully, say Sarah Angelino and Stephen Copenhaver of Schiff Hardin.

  • Perspectives

    Does Multidistrict Litigation Deny Plaintiffs Due Process?

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    Judges in multidistrict litigation consistently appoint lead plaintiffs lawyers based on their experience, war chests and ability to get along with everyone. But evidence suggests that these repeat players often make deals riddled with self-interest and provisions that goad plaintiffs into settling, says Elizabeth Chamblee Burch of the University of Georgia School of Law.

  • Commercial Lease Negotiations In Texas After Rohrmoos

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    Following the Texas Supreme Court's decision in favor of tenant rights in Rohrmoos Venture v. UTSW DVA Healthcare, parties to commercial leases should pay close attention to issues like what constitutes a landlord's breach of lease, and whether the tenant will waive the right to terminate in the event of a breach, says Cara Kelly of Greenberg Traurig.

  • When Experts Are Effective In Insurance Coverage Litigation

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    Jonathan Kuller and Ashlyn Capote of Goldberg Segalla analyze persuasive use of expert testimony in insurance coverage cases, employing one of their cases as an example.

  • Measuring The Value Of A Law Firm's Social Media Efforts

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    Most legal marketers struggle to show the return on investment of their social media efforts, but establishing and answering several key questions can help demonstrate exactly how social media programs contribute to a law firm's bottom line, say Guy Alvarez of Good2bSocial and communications consultant Tom Orewyler.

  • What To Expect From An Appeal Of FTC V. Qualcomm

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    Any appeal of a California federal judge's ruling in Federal Trade Commission v. Qualcomm will likely raise a number of interesting legal issues at the intersection of antitrust and fair licensing of standard-essential patents, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Cooperating With Competitors In The Wake Of Qualcomm

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    It is well-understood that joint business ventures between rivals can bring antitrust risk. But a California federal judge's recent Qualcomm decision underscores the importance of examining the opposite angle — whether refusing to do deals with rivals will trigger antitrust liability, say Amy Gallegos and Julia Kim Hirata at Jenner & Block.

  • The Uncertain Future Of Gov't Investigations Post-Deutsche

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    A New York federal judge's recent decision in the Deutsche Bank Libor-rigging case U.S. v. Connolly threatens to upend decades of established cooperation practice in government investigations, a fact to which the opinion makes only a passing reference, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Opinion

    Millennials Are Pushing Back Against Law Firm Sexism

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    A recent survey of millennial attorneys shows men and women are having very different BigLaw experiences, but share similar goals. It's imperative that partners recognize that they’re the ones in a position to change the culture, says Michelle Fivel of Major Lindsey.