Trials

  • July 02, 2020

    SDNY Trial Of Banker Tied To Manafort Is Delayed

    A New York federal judge on Thursday delayed at least until December the trial of a banker accused of attempting to bribe Trump campaign boss Paul Manafort with $16 million in loans in exchange for a shot at working in the administration.

  • July 02, 2020

    Md. Court Says $38M Police Shooting Award Wrongly Tossed

    A Maryland appeals court has reversed a trial judge's decision to toss a jury's $38 million verdict in a wrongful death suit accusing Baltimore County police of negligently shooting a woman to death in 2016, saying the judge improperly resolved factual disputes that were within the province of the jurors.

  • July 02, 2020

    DC Judge Knocks ICE For Detaining Teens, Altering Evidence

    A D.C. federal judge on Thursday found that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement broke the law by not considering less restrictive housing options for migrant teenagers who turn 18 in government custody, and knocked the agency for altering evidence before trial.

  • July 02, 2020

    Ex-NFL Player Fights For Jury Trial In ERISA Suit

    A former Kansas City Chief urged a Texas federal judge on Wednesday not to deny him a jury trial in his suit against the NFL player retirement plan that allegedly refused him benefits for physical and mental injuries suffered on the job.

  • July 02, 2020

    Entrepreneur Who Gave Tips On Dad's Pharma Co. Gets Year

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced entrepreneur Telemaque Lavidas on Thursday to a year and a day in prison for insider trading, after a jury convicted him of passing secrets to a trader friend about Ariad Pharmaceuticals, where his father sat on the board.

  • July 02, 2020

    Top Pennsylvania Cases Of 2020: A Midyear Report

    Despite the coronavirus pandemic all but shuttering state courthouses for three months, Pennsylvania's appellate courts continued issuing key decisions on major topics over the first half of 2020 such as clarifying the role of trial judges in jury selection and procedures for reviewing potentially privileged material.

  • July 02, 2020

    Top New Jersey Cases Of 2020: A Midyear Report

    New Jersey attorneys made possible a host of significant achievements in the first half of 2020 as the state maintained its place as the second-hardest-hit by COVID-19 and shuttered courtrooms forced most proceedings to be held via telephone or Zoom. 

  • July 01, 2020

    Insys Execs Can't Dodge Prison During Appeal, Seek Delay

    The First Circuit said Wednesday that Insys Therapeutics Inc. founder John Kapoor and other former executives can't dodge prison while they appeal convictions on charges of scheming to bribe doctors to prescribe the company's fentanyl spray, but they're asking the trial court to put off their prison surrender date.

  • July 01, 2020

    SEC Says Broker Can't Attack Its Investigation In Bribe Trial

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission asked a Manhattan federal court to keep an analyst's upcoming bribery trial limited to his alleged cover-up of an $11,000 ski trip, saying the court should block an anticipated defense centered on the SEC's investigation and the misdeeds of co-conspirators.

  • July 01, 2020

    Calif. Court Affirms Docs, Med Center Win In Jaw Surgery Suit

    A California appeals court has affirmed a verdict in favor of two doctors and an outpatient surgery center over a botched jaw surgery, including a judge's decision to terminate a number of claims after the close of evidence in the trial, saying Wednesday that decision was not in error.

  • July 01, 2020

    Former Obama Deputy WH Counsel Joins Latham in NYC

    Latham & Watkins LLP has tapped former deputy White House counsel and MacAndrews & Forbes deputy general counsel Michael Bosworth to join its New York office as a partner in the litigation and trial department and a member of the white collar defense & investigations practice, the firm said Wednesday.

  • July 01, 2020

    Split 4th Circ. Won't Restore Overridden FMLA Verdict

    A split panel of Fourth Circuit judges found Wednesday that a lower court did not err in granting a judgment in favor of Rand Construction Corp. in a former employee's suit accusing the company of unlawfully firing her, saying the company showed a proper explanation for the firing.

  • July 01, 2020

    Ill. Court Upholds Cook County's $9M Insurance Trial Win

    An Illinois appellate court on Tuesday upheld a jury's decision to award Cook County roughly $9 million in damages in a contract dispute with insurance broker USI Insurance, rejecting both the insurer's bid to ax the award and the county's attempt to boost it to $32.5 million.

  • July 01, 2020

    NY Court Tosses $1.1M Med Mal Verdict In Sinus Surgery Suit

    A New York appellate court on Wednesday vacated a $1.1 million verdict in a suit accusing an ear, nose and throat doctor of botching a woman's sinus surgery and causing her to lose her sense of smell and suffer other injuries, saying there was a lack of relevant evidence.

  • July 01, 2020

    Samsung Averts Texas Trial, Settles Face-Detection IP Case

    Samsung and patent adversary Image Processing Technologies said Wednesday that they have settled a lawsuit over face detection technology, averting a July 6 jury trial before U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap, who earlier this week refused to delay the proceeding despite Texas' spike in coronavirus cases.

  • June 30, 2020

    Biogen Gets Temporary Halt On Unapproved Mylan MS Drug

    Biogen has urged the Federal Circuit to bar Mylan from moving forward with a generic version of Biogen's top-selling multiple sclerosis drug Tecfidera while it appeals a patent invalidation, leading the appellate court to grant temporary relief Tuesday.

  • June 30, 2020

    Key Senators Want To Add New Federal Judgeships This Year

    The Republican chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee was joined by the panel's Democrats on Tuesday in calling to create new federal judgeships for the first time in nearly 20 years, but the idea needs broader GOP support to move forward.

  • June 30, 2020

    NY Courthouses To Check Body Temps: 100° Or Less To Enter

    New York state court officials on Tuesday announced that attorneys and other visitors will soon be required to submit to a body temperature check by officers at courthouse doors — if the thermometer reads over 100 degrees, no entry will be permitted.

  • June 30, 2020

    Colo. Justices Say Courts Can Extend Speedy Trial Period

    The Colorado Supreme Court has established criteria by which trial courts can grant requests for postponement and a tolling of speedy trial periods because of the COVID-19 pandemic, noting that the courts are facing a Catch-22 as they try to balance defendants' rights and scheduling concerns.

  • June 30, 2020

    Calif. School District's Win Upheld In Student Suicide Suit

    A California appellate court has upheld a public school district's trial win in a wrongful death suit over a student's suicide, saying the trial judge erred by allowing an improper claim to proceed to trial.

  • June 30, 2020

    Texas Panel Overturns Misrepresentation Verdict Against Atty

    A Texas appeals court has tossed a negligent misrepresentation verdict against an attorney accused of convincing a nonclient to sign a property transfer document under false pretenses, finding there was no evidence to support the jury's finding.

  • June 30, 2020

    Halkbank Case May Be A Slog In The COVID-19 Age

    An attorney for Turkey's state-owned Halkbank on Tuesday told a New York federal judge it didn't envision being ready for trial over an alleged multibillion-dollar scheme to evade American sanctions targeting Iran until the spring of 2022, citing the difficulties brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • June 30, 2020

    7th Circ. Says Boy's $8.3M Birth Injury Award Is Reasonable

    The Seventh Circuit on Monday rejected the U.S. government's request to vacate an $8.3 million award for a 5-year-old boy who suffered a serious shoulder injury when he was born at a federally supported clinic, saying the trial judge determined reasonable damages.

  • June 29, 2020

    Judge Explains Partial Denial Of Roger Stone Prison Delay Bid

    A D.C. federal judge on Monday unsealed the full version of her decision last week to give Roger Stone an extra two weeks to report to prison while denying the longtime conservative operative's request to extend the surrender date even further to September.

  • June 29, 2020

    AmerisourceBergen CEO Must Testify In Opioid Bellwether

    Virginia Special Master Christopher C. Wilkes on Monday ordered AmerisourceBergen Drug Corp. CEO Steven H. Collis to testify in the second bellwether opioid suit expected to head to trial in federal multidistrict litigation, rejecting the company's arguments taking his video-deposition would be too burdensome.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Time To Consider Percentage Rental Agreements For Lawyers

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    It has long been the law that attorneys cannot use percentage rental agreements because doing so would constitute an impermissible sharing of fees with nonlawyers, but such arrangements can help lawyers match expenses with revenues in lean times like now, say Peter Jarvis and Trisha Thompson at Holland & Knight.

  • Rebuttal

    The Remote Jury Trial Is Not A Bad Idea

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    A recent Law360 guest article argued that the fundamental genius of the jury trial can only exist in a live setting in a courtroom, but the online process is at least as fair as its in-person counterpart, says Pavel Bespalko at Tricorne.

  • Calif. Cannabis Delivery Case May Bring Black-Market Growth

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    A win for municipalities suing the California Bureau of Cannabis Control in an upcoming trial this month would likely lead to an increase in black-market services by disallowing legal statewide marijuana delivery, say Michael Rosenblum and Lauren Chee at Thompson Coburn.

  • 'Settle And Sue' Malpractice Cases Have New Clarity In Calif.

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    A California state appellate court's recent decision in Masellis v. Law Office of Leslie F. Jensen provides a road map for proving causation and damages in settle-and-sue legal malpractice cases — an important issue of long-standing confusion, says Steven Berenson at Klinedinst.

  • A Guide To West Texas Patent Cases Before Albright: Part 1

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    Patent litigants must become familiar with the unique procedures of the Western District of Texas under Judge Alan Albright, who has already heard 18% of all nationwide patent infringement cases this year and is expected to hear more than 600 complaints by the end of 2020, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • What You Say In Online Mediation May Be Discoverable

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    Mediation conducted online with participants in different states makes it harder to determine where communications were made, increasing the risk that courts will apply laws of a state that does not protect mediation confidentiality, say mediators Jeff Kichaven and Teresa Frisbie and law student Tyler Codina.

  • Key Defense Approaches To 'Other Similar Incident' Evidence

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    A New York state court's recent ruling in Marshall v. Port Authority of New York and New Jersey shows that, while product liability plaintiffs seek to use so-called other similar incident evidence to argue that manufacturers know their products are unsafe, defense counsel can successfully challenge such evidence, says Timothy Freeman at Tanenbaum Keale.

  • 10 Tips For A Successful Remote Arbitration Hearing

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    As I learned after completing a recent international arbitration remotely, with advance planning a video hearing can replicate the in-person experience surprisingly well, and may actually be superior in certain respects, says Kate Shih at Quinn Emanuel.

  • Opinion

    To Achieve Diversity, Law Firms Must Reinvent Hiring Process

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    If law firms are truly serious about making meaningful change in terms of diversity, they must adopt a demographically neutral, unbiased hiring equation that looks at personality traits with greater import than grades and class rank, says Thomas Latino at Florida State University College of Law.

  • Cybersecurity Steps For Law Firms Amid Heightened Risks

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    With large swaths of the population indoors and primarily online, cybercriminals will be able to exploit law firms more easily now than ever before, but some basic precautions can help, says Joel Wallenstrom at Wickr.

  • 4 Tips For Defending Consolidated Cases

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    Consolidation of plaintiffs may be a trend we'll see more of in the aftermath of COVID-19 court closures, with added risks for those defending such cases before a jury, but running a targeted voir dire and incorporating a strong case theme could go a long way, says Christina Marinakis at Litigation Insights.

  • Calif. Employment Cases Actually Favor Summary Judgment

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    A review of published California appeals court opinions suggests summary judgment remains disfavored in employment cases, but considering unpublished rulings as well shows the vast majority have affirmed the remedy, say Scott Dixler and Sarah Hamill at Horvitz & Levy.

  • Consumer Device Data May Pose Problems In Med Mal Suits

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    Information generated by smart watches and other consumer technology may help doctors assess patient health, but could be subject to challenges during medical malpractice suits since it is still unclear who can legally authenticate it, says Marilyn Skrocki at Saginaw Valley State University.

  • Vexing PTAB Apple Decision May Overtax West Texas Court

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    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board's recent precedential Apple v. Fintiv decision, denying inter partes review based on parallel district court proceedings, is contrary to congressional intent and could burden burden federal courts that promise a faster time to trial like the Western District of Texas, say Harper Batts and Chris Ponder at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Recovering Lost Video Game Profits In The Age Of COVID-19

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    Given the popularity of video games during the pandemic, the developer of a game that cannot go to market because of an alleged breach of a contract may prepare rosy projections of lost profits, but such estimates may not always be persuasive in court, says Bruce Isaacs at Signature Resolution.

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