White Collar

  • July 01, 2024

    House Republicans Call For ACA Enrollment Probe

    Three House Republican committee chairs are asking government watchdogs to investigate Affordable Care Act enrollments after a third-party report alleged a significant number of Americans are fraudulently accessing low-income healthcare subsidies. 

  • July 01, 2024

    Binance, Ex-CEO Must Face 'Bulk' Of SEC Case

    A Washington, D.C., federal judge has ruled that Binance, its former CEO and its U.S. arm will have to face the "bulk" of a lawsuit from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, but claims surrounding the crypto exchange's stablecoin and certain secondary sales of its proprietary token won't move forward.

  • July 01, 2024

    Pa. Man Gets 12 Years For $2M COVID-19 Funds Fraud

    A Pennsylvania man was sentenced to approximately 12 years in prison following his convictions for bank fraud, aggravated identity theft and unlawful monetary transactions related to theft of federal COVID-19 pandemic relief funds, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Middle District of Pennsylvania.

  • July 01, 2024

    Admiral, CEOs Deny Steering Navy Contracts

    A retired four-star Navy admiral and two executives at a leadership training company pled not guilty to charges of conspiracy and bribery Monday morning in D.C. federal court, vowing to take the U.S. Department of Justice's case to trial.

  • July 01, 2024

    Ex-Calif. Law Firm CFO Charged in $1.2M Embezzlement

    The former chief financial officer of two related San Francisco law firms now faces federal criminal charges that he embezzled at least $1.2 million from the companies, and the government is trying to seize some of his properties.

  • July 01, 2024

    Judge Acquits Firm Co-Founder, 27 Others Over Panama Papers

    When authorities raided the now defunct Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca as part of their investigation into the international money laundering case known as the Panama Papers, they didn't follow the chain of custody for evidence they seized, so 28 people accused in the conspiracy must be acquitted, a Panamanian judge has ruled.

  • July 01, 2024

    Fla. Court Releases 2006 Epstein Grand Jury Transcripts

    A Florida state court judge on Monday made public the 2006 grand jury transcripts of the Jeffrey Epstein sex abuse investigation after a newspaper persuaded him to reconsider releasing them in light of a new law signed by Gov. Ron DeSantis earlier this year.

  • July 01, 2024

    Feds Say Ex-Magellan Officer's Atty May Have Conflict

    A Donnelly Conroy & Gelhaar LLP attorney's prior representation of co-defendants in a pending fraud case against former executives of medical device company Magellan Diagnostics may have created a disqualifying conflict of interest, lawyers for the government told a Massachusetts federal judge.

  • July 01, 2024

    Texas Attorney Serving 15-Year Sentence Is Disbarred

    The State Bar of Texas announced Monday that it has yanked the license of a criminal defense attorney who was sentenced in 2021 to more than 15 years in prison after a jury found him guilty of cheating big-time Colombian drug trafficking clients.

  • July 01, 2024

    Supreme Court Gives Trump Immunity For Official Acts

    Former presidents are entitled to absolute immunity from prosecution related to an indefinite list of official acts, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday, partially releasing Donald Trump from liability for allegedly interfering with the 2020 presidential election, but ultimately tasking lower courts with sussing out the full extent of his immunity.

  • June 28, 2024

    Cahill Hires SDNY Vet Who Prosecuted 'Real Housewives' Star

    Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP has hired an eight-year veteran of the U.S. Attorney's Office for Southern District of New York who was a senior member of the office's Securities and Commodities Fraud Task Force and prosecuted a former U.S. congressional representative and a star of one of "The Real Housewives" TV series.

  • June 28, 2024

    Chevron's End Is Just The Start For Energized Agency Foes

    By knocking down a powerful precedent that has towered over administrative law for 40 years, the U.S. Supreme Court's right wing Friday gave a crowning achievement to anti-agency attorneys. But for those attorneys, the achievement is merely a means to an end, and experts expect a litigation blitzkrieg to materialize quickly in the aftermath.

  • June 28, 2024

    CUNY Medical Prof Accused Of Fabricating NIH Grant Apps

    A medical professor at the City College of New York and paid adviser to Cassava Sciences has been indicted on allegations he falsified scientific data in grant applications submitted to the National Institutes of Health on behalf of himself and Cassava, prosecutors announced Friday.

  • June 28, 2024

    Prosecution Rests In Menendez Bribery Trial

    New York federal prosecutors on Friday closed out their case-in-chief that Sen. Robert Menendez accepted bribes from constituent businessmen, resting after a final witness said some $550,000 in cash seized from the senator's wife's house could not have been from his cash withdrawals in recent years, which were only $55,000.

  • June 28, 2024

    Citi Wants Termination Suit Over Alleged Lies To OCC Tossed

    Citibank has urged a New York federal judge to toss a suit by a former managing director of the bank who claims she was fired for not reporting false information to compliance authorities, arguing that even if her claims are true, she hasn't plausibly alleged a cause of action under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

  • June 28, 2024

    Eagles' Don Henley Wants 'Hotel California' Lyrics Returned

    Eagles frontman Don Henley is seeking to retake possession of handwritten lyric sheets that were seized by the Manhattan District Attorney's Office in a now-dismissed criminal case over the sale of the allegedly stolen album notes, asking a New York federal judge Friday to declare that he is the legal owner.

  • June 28, 2024

    FCPA, Shkreli Prosecutor To Lead EDNY's Criminal Division

    Breon Peace, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York, on Friday said Alixandra Smith, known for taking point in the prosecution of Martin Shkreli and her leading roles in foreign bribery cases, has been appointed as the new chief of the office's Criminal Division.

  • June 28, 2024

    In Chevron Case, Justices Trade One Unknown For Another

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overrule a decades-old judicial deference doctrine may cause the "eternal fog of uncertainty" surrounding federal agency actions to dissipate and level the playing field in challenges of government policies, but lawyers warn it raises new questions over what rules courts must follow and how judges will implement them.

  • June 28, 2024

    Ontrak Exec Conviction Shows Trading Plans Aren't Shields

    Executives who use so-called Rule 10b5-1 trading plans to buy and sell shares of their company's stock don't have an automatic shield against insider trading charges, attorneys said following the first criminal conviction of an executive based exclusively on his use of the plans, which are facing increased scrutiny from financial regulators.

  • June 28, 2024

    Justices' SEC Ruling Unlikely To Bear On Immigration Actions

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision reining in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's use of administrative courts is unlikely to help Walmart and SpaceX escape proceedings for alleged immigration-related violations, with the justices punting on the authority of administrative law judges.

  • June 28, 2024

    Fla. Air Force Vet Charged With Sharing Classified Information

    A Florida Air Force veteran was accused of distributing classified materials about military aircraft in a federal indictment, which charged him with several counts of sharing national defense information that could be used to harm the United States.

  • June 28, 2024

    Shkreli Asks High Court To Toss $64M Disgorgement Order

    Former pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli, who gained notoriety for hiking the price of HIV/AIDS medication before serving more than four years in prison for securities fraud, is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to toss a disgorgement order requiring him to pay $64 million for monopolistic price-gouging.

  • June 28, 2024

    NJ Contractor Admits To Defrauding Defense Dept.

    A New Jersey businessman has admitted in federal court to engaging in two multiyear schemes to defraud the U.S. Defense Department on contracts for military equipment parts and agreeing to rig bids for government contracts.

  • June 28, 2024

    Buttigieg Says Rescheduling Pot Would Not Alter DOT Policy

    If the U.S. Department of Justice were to loosen federal restrictions on marijuana as it has proposed, it would not affect the U.S. Department of Transportation's authority to screen for the drug, Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg told members of Congress.

  • June 28, 2024

    Bitcoin Device Seller Sues Ex-CEO, Alleging $5.3M Fraud

    A California-based crypto mining-farm builder and equipment seller has sued its former CEO in California federal court, alleging that he embezzled roughly $5.3 million, leading to the company's failure to pay multiple vendors in a timely manner.

Expert Analysis

  • Strategies For Navigating Compliance Monitorships

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    As independent compliance monitorships continue to be a favored tool of the government in resolving corporate enforcement matters, counsel should have a firm grasp on best practices for selecting a monitor, preparing the company and ensuring a productive relationship between the parties, say attorneys at WilmerHale.

  • At 'SEC Speaks,' A Focus On Rebuilding Trust Amid Criticism

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    At the Practising Law Institute's SEC Speaks conference last week, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission leadership highlighted efforts to rebuild and restore trust in the U.S. capital markets by addressing investor concerns through regulatory measures and enforcement actions, emphasizing the need for cooperation from market participants, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    NY Banking Brief: All The Notable Legal Updates In Q1

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    The first quarter of 2024 saw a number of notable legal and regulatory developments that will significantly affect New York's financial services industry, including the New York Department of Financial Services' finalized novel guidance directing banks to continuously monitor the character and fitness of key personnel, say Brian Montgomery and Nathan Lewko at Pillsbury.

  • Weisselberg's Perjury At Trial Spotlights Atty Ethics Issues

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    Former Trump Organization executive Allen Weisselberg’s recent guilty plea for perjury in the New York attorney general's civil fraud trial should serve as a reminder to attorneys of their ethical duties when they know a client has lied or plans to lie in court, and the potential penalties for not fulfilling those obligations, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • When Trade Secret Protection And Nat'l Security Converge

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    The Trump administration's anti-espionage program focused on China is over, but federal enforcement efforts to protect trade secrets and U.S. national security continue, and companies doing business in high-risk jurisdictions need to maintain their compliance programs to avoid the risk of being caught in the crosshairs of an investigation, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • Calif. Verdict Showcases SEC's New 'Shadow Trading' Theory

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    Last week's insider trading verdict, delivered against biopharmaceutical executive Matthew Panuwat by a California federal jury, signals open season on a new area of regulatory enforcement enabled by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's shadow trading theory, say Perrie Weiner and Aaron Goodman at Baker McKenzie.

  • Strategies For Defense Attys To Subpoena A Nonparty Witness

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    Federal criminal defendants seeking to subpoena potentially exculpatory information from nonparty witnesses must satisfy a stringent standard and should consider several often overlooked arguments to assure courts they’re not engaging in a fishing expedition, says James Roberts at Schlam Stone.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • High Court's Jan. 6 Rioter Case May Have Wide Ripple Effects

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    The U.S. Supreme Court will soon hear oral arguments in Fischer v. United States, a case that will determine whether a law enacted after the Enron scandal can be used to prosecute Jan. 6 rioters, and could affect the government’s ability to charge those who impede a range of official proceedings, say Brook Dooley and Sara Fitzpatrick at Keker Van Nest.

  • Bankruptcy Courts' Role In Shaping Crypto's Legal Framework

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    Massive financial and criminal liability has led to the recent collapse of major cryptocurrency companies and put bankruptcy courts in the spotlight, underscoring the urgent need for a comprehensive regulatory framework, say Tara Pakrouh and Eric Monzo at Morris James.

  • Trump's NY Civil Fraud Trial Spotlights Long-Criticized Law

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    A New York court’s recent decision holding former President Donald Trump liable for fraud brought old criticisms of the state law used against him back into the limelight — including its strikingly broad scope and its major departures from the traditional elements of common law fraud, say Mark Kelley and Lois Ahn at MoloLamken.

  • Intent-Based Theory Of Liability In Hwang Creates Ambiguity

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    A case against Archegos Capital founder Bill Hwang alleging that he participated in a securities manipulation scheme, which goes to trial next month in New York federal court, highlights the need for courts to clarify the legal standard defining "market manipulation," says Edward Imperatore at MoFo.

  • How A Motion Before Justices May Help Trump Beyond Court

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    Even if Donald Trump loses his presidential immunity claim before the U.S. Supreme Court, the delay created by the motion may mean a trial can't be completed before the November election, says Paul Tuchmann at Wiggin and Dana.

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