White Collar

  • June 16, 2022

    NYC Can't Seal Prosecutor Misconduct Complaints

    The city of New York can't use the confidentiality of attorney disciplinary proceedings to keep a group of law professors from publishing their complaints of prosecutorial misconduct, a New York federal court has ruled.

  • June 16, 2022

    Ind. High Court Suspends Ex-Casino GC After Tax Fraud Plea

    The former general counsel and vice president of an Indiana gaming company has been suspended from practicing law in the state after he pled guilty to tax fraud in April.

  • June 16, 2022

    Dogecoin Buyer Accuses Musk Of Fraud In $258B Suit

    A dogecoin buyer sued Elon Musk, Tesla and SpaceX for $258 billion on Thursday, saying they orchestrated a pyramid scheme by hyping the joke cryptocurrency, which has since plunged in value.

  • June 16, 2022

    Ex-Celtic Attacker Denied New Trial On Separate Charge

    A man convicted of assaulting former Boston Celtics star Paul Pierce in 2000 won't get a new trial for an unrelated attack years later due to alleged issues with his defense lawyer's trial decisions, the First Circuit said Wednesday.

  • June 16, 2022

    'Varsity Blues' Dad Acquitted In Lone Loss For Prosecutors

    A Boston federal jury on Thursday acquitted a Massachusetts businessman on charges he bribed his daughter's way into Georgetown University through illicit payments to the elite school's tennis coach, ending the government's clean record of convictions in the "Varsity Blues" investigation.

  • June 16, 2022

    Rising Star: Wiley Rein's Brandon J. Moss

    Brandon J. Moss of Wiley Rein LLP has advised clients on fraud investigations and white collar crimes for 11 years, including successfully defending former pharmaceutical executive Timothy Baxter against charges over opioid marketing, earning her a spot among the white collar attorneys under 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • June 16, 2022

    Spacey Appears In London Court On Sex Assault Charges

    Hollywood actor Kevin Spacey appeared at a London criminal court on Thursday accused of five sexual offenses.

  • June 15, 2022

    LA Developer Told Informant Ex-Pol 'Played' Them, Jury Hears

    Jurors considering the criminal case against a real estate developer accused of bribing former L.A. City Councilman Jose Huizar heard a reenactment of a secretly recorded conversation in which the developer told a middleman cooperating with the FBI that they were "both played" by Huizar.

  • June 15, 2022

    Maxwell Calls Epstein 'Mastermind,' Slams 20-Year Term Rec

    Ghislaine Maxwell on Wednesday asked a Manhattan federal judge to give her a lighter sentence than the 20 years that U.S. Probation and Pretrial Services recommended she serve following her sex-trafficking conviction, saying she shouldn't bear the punishment that "would have been appropriate for Jeffrey Epstein."

  • June 15, 2022

    BitMEX Co-Founder Avoids Prison In Bank Secrecy Act Case

    BitMEX co-founder Benjamin Delo on Wednesday was sentenced to probation for his role in operating the offshore cryptocurrency derivatives exchange without an effective anti-money laundering program, and is expected to soon leave the U.S.

  • June 15, 2022

    GOP Sens. Want Protesters Outside Judges' Homes Charged

    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and other Republican senators on Wednesday pressed Attorney General Merrick Garland to prosecute protesters who gather outside of judges' homes, calling it "an urgent matter of national importance."

  • June 15, 2022

    NJ Pot Law Does Not Reopen Door To Diversion Programs

    New Jersey law bars criminal defendants from taking part in more than one diversionary program, even if their original stints involved marijuana cases that were later expunged under the state's cannabis legalization statute, a state appeals court has said.

  • June 15, 2022

    DaVita Must Return Rather Than Destroy No-Poach Docs

    A Colorado federal judge on Wednesday ordered DaVita to return rather than destroy confidential documents produced by the U.S. Department of Justice in its failed criminal no-poach case against the dialysis giant, giving a minor win to follow-on civil plaintiffs who hoped the documents would be preserved for possible use in their litigation.

  • June 15, 2022

    Zuora Says Ex-VP Can't Have Co.'s Secrets And His Fees Too

    A departing executive's final two weeks at Zuora Inc. became the focus of his advancement suit in the Delaware Chancery Court on Wednesday, with the cloud-subscription company arguing it had told him not to work and that he had used that time to steal confidential data, putting him on the hook for his own legal fees.

  • June 15, 2022

    Musk Appeals Judge's Decision To Keep SEC Tweet Deal Alive

    Tesla CEO Elon Musk gave notice on Wednesday that he will appeal a New York federal judge's denial of Musk's attempts to scrap 2018 agreements with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission requiring that the company preapprove his tweets.

  • June 15, 2022

    Ex-GOP Rep. Should Get 6 Months For Lying To FBI, Feds Say

    California federal prosecutors are seeking a six-month prison sentence and $30,000 fine for former U.S. Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., after he was convicted of lying to the FBI about illegal campaign contributions.

  • June 15, 2022

    FinCEN No-Action Plan May Spur Crypto Innovation, In Theory

    A proposal this month from the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network to implement a no-action letter process could be a potential boon for purveyors of digital assets seeking more regulatory clarity, but there are plenty of hurdles that could dampen its effectiveness, industry attorneys said.

  • June 15, 2022

    Greenberg Team Set To Attack Feds' NFT Insider Trading Case

    Greenberg Traurig LLP lawyers representing a New York City purveyor of nonfungible tokens asserted Wednesday that the Manhattan U.S. attorney's office has failed to bring viable insider trading charges against their client, telling a federal judge they may file for dismissal.

  • June 15, 2022

    Pension Plans Assail Denmark's Bid For Win In $2B Tax Case

    Several U.S. pension plans urged a New York federal court Wednesday to reject the Danish tax agency's bid for victory without trial in its $2.1 billion fraud case, arguing it would require the court to impermissibly enforce foreign laws.

  • June 15, 2022

    Fla. Medical Device Co. Hits Ch. 11 Amid Ex-CEO Litigation

    Stimwave Technologies Inc. filed for Chapter 11 protection in Delaware on Wednesday in the midst of Chancery Court litigation with its ex-CEO over allegations of financial and operational mismanagement by the former leadership team.

  • June 15, 2022

    3rd Circ. Says Inmates Have Right To Access Legal Materials

    Prisoners may bring claims alleging they were denied access to legal materials while they were pursuing civil rights cases from behind bars, the Third Circuit said Wednesday in a precedential opinion setting forth that right to access the courts.

  • June 15, 2022

    SEC Nabs $573K Judgment In Snap Insider Trading Case

    A California federal judge has ordered the brother-in-law of a former engineer with Snap Inc. to pay more than $573,000 for allegedly using inside information to reap more than $261,000 in profits, after the court granted the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's default judgment motion.

  • June 15, 2022

    Rising Star: Steptoe & Johnson's Katie Dubyak

    Katie Dubyak of Steptoe & Johnson LLP steered Volkswagen AG through a three-year monitorship imposed after its emissions-cheating scandal and conducted a sweeping investigation into corruption at the Baltimore Police Department, earning her a spot among the white collar law practitioners under age 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • June 15, 2022

    Bannon Can't Escape Jan. 6 Subpoena Indictment

    A D.C. federal judge on Wednesday denied former Trump White House aide Steve Bannon's motion to dismiss his indictment for defying a subpoena issued by the House select committee probing last year's deadly U.S. Capitol attack, setting the stage for a jury trial on July 18.

  • June 15, 2022

    Cleary Notes Off-Limits In Ex-Citi Trader's Forex Probe Suit

    A former Citigroup Inc. trader can't access Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP's reports of U.S. Department of Justice meetings in his lawsuit alleging the bank framed him to save itself during a foreign exchange-rigging probe, a Manhattan federal judge said Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • How Law Schools Can Navigate Toward Equity And Inclusion

    Author Photo

    Law schools have a responsibility to do more than admit students from underrepresented populations — they must understand the challenges that minority law students face, learn why so few reach the highest levels of the legal profession, and introduce programs that help foster inclusion and reduce inequities, says Jennifer Rosato Perea at DePaul College of Law.

  • Where Judge Jackson Stands On Key Civil Procedure Issues

    Author Photo

    During Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s confirmation hearings this week, senators didn’t question her on the many procedural issues that frequently come before the U.S. Supreme Court, but a deep dive into her judicial record illuminates her stance on Article III standing, personal jurisdiction and more, says James Wagstaffe at Wagstaffe von Loewenfeldt Busch.

  • A Look At Jackson's False Claims Act Jurisprudence

    Author Photo

    U.S. Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson's rulings in two False Claims Act cases early in her judicial career show how she meticulously parses the law and pleadings to arrive at her conclusions, and hint at her position on an important federal circuit split in FCA jurisprudence, say Brad Robertson and Giovanni Giarratana at Bradley Arant.

  • FinCEN Alerts On Sanctions Evasion Signal Shifting Approach

    Author Photo

    The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network's recent warnings regarding potential evasion of sanctions against Russia and Belarus place new importance on FinCEN's customer due diligence and beneficial ownership rules, signal changes to the Bank Secrecy Act and create implicit supervisory expectations, say Constantine Lizas and Ross Hofherr at Harris Beach.

  • Export Control Compliance Amid Stricter Russia Restrictions

    Author Photo

    As the Biden administration steps up export control enforcement and implements an unprecedented sanctions program targeting Russia, exporters should tailor their compliance programs, identify heightened compliance risks and consider voluntarily disclosing existing violations, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Lessons From Recent PPP Loan And COVID Fraud Cases

    Author Photo

    Following President Joe Biden's recent pledge to expand enforcement efforts against pandemic and Paycheck Protection Program loan fraud, a look at the U.S. Department of Justice's recent criminal and civil enforcement actions sheds light on its evolving priorities, say Sara Lord and Aaron Danzig at Arnall Golden.

  • How To Avoid Prematurely Publicizing A Case Outcome

    Author Photo

    The lessons of a recent U.K. case involving Matrix Chambers' premature social media posts that violated a court embargo are relevant in the U.S. as well, reminding law firms to ensure plans to publicize a case are shielded from accidental violations of court sealing and gag orders, says Elizabeth Ortega at ECO Strategic Communications.

  • Opinion

    It's Time To Hold DC Judges Accountable For Misconduct

    Author Photo

    On the heels of Thursday's congressional hearing on workplace protections for judiciary employees, former law clerk Aliza Shatzman recounts her experience of harassment by a D.C. Superior Court judge — and argues that the proposed Judiciary Accountability Act, which would extend vital anti-discrimination protections to federal court employees, should also include D.C. courts.

  • New FARA Advisory Opinions Should Put Nonprofits On Alert

    Author Photo

    Recently published U.S. Department of Justice advisory opinions show that a charitable mission doesn’t necessarily exempt a nonprofit organization from Foreign Agents Registration Act enforcement, and highlight the importance of considering FARA implications when interacting with foreign donors and leaders, say Meredith McCoy and Pavla Ovtchinnikova at Venable.

  • How To Mitigate Sentencing Liability In Complex Fraud Cases

    Author Photo

    In light of Elizabeth Holmes’ recent convictions and the U.S. Department of Justice’s current focus on individual culpability for corporate fraud offenses, defense counsel should follow certain best practices to cabin loss and limit the application of overly punitive federal sentencing guideline enhancements, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • 4 Ways To Preserve Confidentiality Of Litigation Funding Docs

    Author Photo

    Though two recent rulings by Massachusetts and Illinois federal courts add to the growing body of case law denying discovery into litigation funding arrangements, prudence necessitates that lawyers, clients and funders follow certain best practices to ensure that their communications are not discoverable by opposing parties, says Stewart Ackerly at Statera Capital.

  • How The DOJ Is Building Its Crypto AML Playbook

    Author Photo

    The recent arrest of a couple for money laundering the proceeds of the 2016 Bitfinex cryptocurrency exchange hack suggests the U.S. Department of Justice is leveraging the compliance functions of cryptocurrency exchanges and blockchain data analytics software to zero in on money laundering crimes when investigating and pursuing cryptocurrency cases, says Kraig Ahalt at Michelman & Robinson.

  • Rebuttal

    Remote Hearings Are Ill-Suited Default For Litigation Realities

    Author Photo

    A recent Law360 guest article suggests that remote proceedings should be the default in civil litigation even after the pandemic, but courts should continue to give parties the option to appear in person because it can actually save long-term costs, prepare younger attorneys more effectively, and bring a necessary degree of seriousness to hearings, says Mark​ Eisen at Benesch Friedlander.

  • Perspectives

    ABA's New Anti-Bias Curriculum Rule Is Insufficient

    Author Photo

    The American Bar Association's recently approved requirement that law schools educate students on bias, cross-cultural competency and racism, while a step in the right direction, fails to publicly acknowledge and commit to eradicating the systemic racial inequality in our legal system, says criminal defense attorney Donna Mulvihill Fehrmann.

  • How FinCEN Shell Co. Rules Differ From Past BSA Standards

    Author Photo

    Companies will need to understand how the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network’s recently proposed rules implementing the Corporate Transparency Act, aimed at curbing the use of shell companies to move illicit funds, differ from existing Bank Secrecy Act disclosure requirements on several points, from exempt entities to reporting timelines, say attorneys at Moore & Van Allen.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the White Collar archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!