Commercial Litigation UK

  • February 26, 2020

    Computer Makers Cut From Memory Chip Price-Fixing Suit

    A London judge has knocked two defunct computer companies out of a suit seeking damages against Infineon and Micron for their role in a global scheme to hike prices for computer memory chips, but allowed claims from a third shuttered manufacturer to move forward.

  • February 26, 2020

    UK Court Backs Import Duties For Mobility Scooters

    A U.K. appeals court has sided with a tax tribunal’s finding that various types of electric mobility scooters are subject to import duties because they’re akin to motor vehicles designed mainly for transportation, not as conveyances for people with disabilities.

  • February 26, 2020

    Romania Targeted In Arbitration Over Film Co. Seizure

    Romania has been hit with an investor-state claim by a pair of brothers related to a long-running dispute over the country's alleged expropriation of the family’s film company, Cinegrafia Română, which distributed American films. 

  • February 26, 2020

    Ex-Asset Manager CEO Loses Bid To Avoid $17M Bill

    A former chief executive of FM Capital accused of fraud and corruption lost his bid on Wednesday to reduce the $17 million he has to pay the asset manager, after an appeals court ruled that he wasn't guaranteed a discount for other settlements in the case.

  • February 26, 2020

    Iceland Told To Pay Banker Over Fraud Conviction Doubts

    A European court has ordered Iceland to pay a former banking executive compensation after finding that one of the country’s top judges could have been biased during a fraud trial because he lost a “significant” amount of money when the lender collapsed.

  • February 26, 2020

    Feed Supplier Chases Insurer For £2.6M Trade Credit Claim

    The U.K.’s leading chicken feed supplier is suing a French trade credit insurer for £2.6 million ($3.4 million) for allegedly failing to pay out on a policy after one of the agricultural company's customers went bust.

  • February 26, 2020

    Insurers Fight MSC For Damage To Fresh Product Cargo

    French insurers AXA and Generali have joined forces to claim £50,000 ($64,000) from shipping giant MSC Mediterranean for damage to a 15,000-kilogram cargo of fresh products.

  • February 26, 2020

    Developer Loses 'Opportunistic' £5M Suit Over Irish Swaps

    A London judge thrashed a property developer on Wednesday for suing an Irish state-run bank to claw back interest rate payments, saying its “highly opportunistic and meritless” claim was “unreasonable” and should never have wound up in court.

  • February 26, 2020

    Qatar Fraud Trial Against Ex-Barclays Bankers Goes To Jury

    A London jury on Wednesday began deliberating fraud charges against three former Barclays executives accused of hiding millions of pounds in secret fees the British bank paid Qatari investors that injected £3.9 billion ($5 million) into the bank during the financial crisis.

  • February 19, 2020

    Allianz Fights Appeal Over Salvage Costs Of Grounded Ship

    Allianz SE's Austrian subsidiary defended a ruling letting it off the hook for part of the $9.5 million it cost to salvage a container ship grounded near China, telling an appellate court Wednesday that the vessel’s owners were at fault.

  • February 25, 2020

    Banks Blast La.'s 'Serial Amendments' To Bond-Rigging Suit

    Barclays Bank PLC, Jefferies Group LLC and Mizuho Securities USA LLC have urged a Louisiana federal judge to toss the state attorney general office’s bid to file a second amended complaint alleging they and other banks rigged the price of bonds issued by government-sponsored entities such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

  • February 25, 2020

    Investors Push For More Forex Rigging Docs From Big Banks

    Institutional investors accused several major banks Tuesday of withholding documents supporting claims that they manipulated foreign exchange markets for years, urging a London judge to order broader disclosure in the high-profile dispute.

  • February 25, 2020

    Deutsche Bank Hit With $21.8M Suit Over Metals Fraud

    Mercuria Energy Trading has sued Deutsche Bank for $21.8 million, claiming the bank acted as a middleman in a deal for 13,000 metric tons of aluminum that the the trader never received. 

  • February 25, 2020

    Oil Tank Owners Told To File Docs In $8.1 Loan Fight

    The owners of a damaged oil tanker will forfeit the right to have experts defend them in a $8.1 million High Court loan fight if they do not cough up undisclosed documents by March, a judge has said.

  • February 25, 2020

    Genworth Denies AXA's Tax Claim Over PPI Award

    Insurer Genworth told a London judge that an upcoming damages trial over how much it owes rival AXA over improperly sold payment protection insurance shouldn't delve into what kind of tax bill the French insurer might face on the award. 

  • February 25, 2020

    EU To Decide 'Unilaterally' On UK Access To Finance Sector

    The European Union on Tuesday said that it will decide “on a unilateral basis” on equivalent regulation allowing U.K. financial companies access to its markets, as it set out its negotiating mandate to carve out a future relationship with Britain after the end of the Brexit transition in December.

  • February 25, 2020

    Funder Can't Cap Costs After Fraud Case Loss

    The Court of Appeal ruled Tuesday that a litigation funder was not entitled to a cap on the £3.9 million ($5 million) in legal costs it had to pay after its client lost a fraud case against lender Dunbar Assets PLC.

  • February 24, 2020

    Australian Court OKs $250M In Awards Against Spain

    An Australian court on Monday enforced nearly $250 million in arbitral awards owed to renewable energy investors that had prevailed in disputes with Spain over revoked economic incentives, rejecting the country's argument that it was entitled to sovereign immunity.

  • February 24, 2020

    Air Tanzania Must Pay Over $30M In Airbus Lease Scandal

    A judge has ordered Air Tanzania to pay more than $30 million plus interest for an Airbus plane it had leased from a Liberian company, rejecting the airline's efforts to shrug off the debt by blaming a former CEO now facing criminal charges over the deal.

  • February 24, 2020

    Citigroup Settles Carbon Credit Fraud Suit Ahead Of Trial

    A Citigroup unit has inked a settlement in England over its alleged role in carbon credit trades, ending a lawsuit filed by defunct companies accusing the lender of aiding a massive tax fraud.

  • February 24, 2020

    AXA Drops Pork Belly Shipping Insurance Suit Against MSC

    Insurer AXA and a leading frozen ready-meal seller in Germany have agreed to pull their cargo damages claim at London's High Court against shipping giant MSC.

  • February 24, 2020

    Luxury Hotelier Hits Back At Investment Co. In Fee Row

    A hotelier has struck back at an investment company suing him in England for failing to pay fees on loans for a luxury hotel in Jerusalem, accusing it of exploiting its own delays to rack up large, unexplained costs.

  • February 24, 2020

    Surestone, UK General Buyers Hit Pause On £95M Dispute

    The buyers of UK General Insurance Group Ltd. have agreed to pause their lawsuit seeking up to £95 million ($121 million) from the insurer's former parent company Surestone for allegedly selling an “effectively worthless” company.

  • February 21, 2020

    DOL Judge Kills Ex-Morgan Stanley Atty Whistleblower Case

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge has thrown out a former Morgan Stanley attorney’s claims that he was pushed out of his job after he brought up ethical concerns, finding he isn’t protected by the retaliation provision of a U.S. anti-fraud law because he worked in Hong Kong.

  • February 21, 2020

    Ireland To Appeal State Aid Ruling Against Fiat, Luxembourg

    Ireland is appealing a European Court of Justice decision from last year finding carmaker Fiat received illegal state aid from Luxembourg, saying the decision is relevant to an ongoing Irish case, an Irish government representative confirmed Friday.

Expert Analysis

  • Updating The EU Product Liability Directive For The Digital Era

    Author Photo

    As the European Union considers adapting its product liability law for the era of artificial intelligence and self-driving cars, a shift toward making manufacturers prove that their products are compliant could lead to more litigation and a fear of innovation, rather than more product offerings and real protection for consumers, says Sylvie Gallage-Alwis of Signature Litigation.

  • Rebuttal

    AI Can't Accurately Predict Case Length And Cost — Yet

    Author Photo

    A recent Law360 guest article argued that artificial intelligence can precisely estimate the length and cost of a new case, but several limitations will likely delay truly accurate predictions for years to come, says Andrew Russell at Shaw Keller.

  • What To Consider Before Using A Global Noncompete: Part 1

    Author Photo

    In the first installment of this two-part article, Joseph Deng and Loic Coutelier at Baker McKenzie show there is no simple answer to whether or how multinational companies should impose employee noncompete agreements, and share the factors to examine before doing so.

  • Surefire Marketing Methods To Build Your Legal Practice

    Author Photo

    Attorneys who take the time and the risk to showcase their talents through speaking, writing and teaching will find that opportunities will begin building upon themselves, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • Mandatory Mediation May Lie Ahead For England And Wales

    Author Photo

    The U.K. Court of Appeals' decision in Lomax v. Lomax, among other recent developments, show significant judicial support for compulsory mediation of appropriate civil and commercial cases in England and Wales, say Margarita Michael and Grace Spurgeon of O'Melveny.

  • Some Clarity On Inventor-Employee Compensation In The UK

    Author Photo

    The recent U.K. Supreme Court decision in Shanks v. Unilver swept away a perception that some employers are simply too big to pay inventor compensation under the U.K.’s statutory compensation provisions, and may offer some hope to prospective employees, say attorneys at Haseltine Lake.

  • Key Risks And Developments For UK Law Firm Culture In 2020

    Author Photo

    In 2020, law firms throughout the U.K. will be increasingly reshaped by rapid changes in societal expectations and advances in technology, say Helen Rowlands and Niya Phiri of Clyde & Co.

  • What UK Ruling On Claims Agencies Could Mean For Airlines

    Author Photo

    A U.K. Supreme Court ruling in a suit between law firm Bott & Co. and Ryanair over the use of third parties in passenger disputes could embolden claims agencies and increase the administrative burden on airlines in the handling of flight compensation regulation claims, says James Jordan of Holman Fenwick.

  • The Rise Of Patent Wars In Europe's Gene Therapy Space

    Author Photo

    Drug companies can prepare for increasing competition and a rise in contentious patent proceedings in Europe’s gene therapy industry by aligning patents, orphan designations and data exclusivity where possible, say Jane Hollywood and Frances Denney of CMS Legal.

  • Product Liability Claims Can Be A Global Threat To Cos.

    Author Photo

    When allegations of product risks related to health, safety or the environment spread from one jurisdiction to countries around the world, they can lead to both policy responses and mass litigation that can jeopardize companies' business models, says Sylvie Gallage-Alwis of Signature Litigation.

  • The Outlook For Autonomous Vehicles In The UK And US

    Author Photo

    As both the U.K. and U.S. governments continue to develop regulatory frameworks for autonomous vehicles, manufacturers can take certain steps to avoid litigation and manage risk, say attorneys at FaegreBD.

  • Innovative Collaborations Require Antitrust Flexibility

    Author Photo

    Joint initiatives by companies active in the same industry are much needed to tackle major challenges like sustainability and digital transformation, but such partnerships may require special exemptions from international antitrust authorities, says Tilman Kuhn of White & Case.

  • New French Law May Be 1st Step In Abating Carousel Fraud

    Author Photo

    Although there is still a long way to go, France's recent adoption of the European Union's Quick Fixes Council Directive will increase the odds of stemming carousel fraud — a type of value-added tax exploitation facilitated by the removal of customs borders, says Sophie Dorin at Bird & Bird.

  • France Pollution Verdict Increases Business Litigation Risk

    Author Photo

    The European Court of Justice's recent ruling against France for excessive carbon dioxide pollution shows that European authorities will strictly interpret environmental legislation, which could invite increased litigation against businesses, says Sylvie Gallage-Alwis of Signature Litigation.

  • PayPal Case Illustrates Difficulty Of Avoiding CMA Penalties

    Author Photo

    The U.K. Competition and Markets Authority's recent fine against PayPal for violating U.K. merger control rules — despite the company's attempts to put safeguards in place — demonstrates how rigid the CMA can be when it comes to initial enforcement orders, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Beta
Ask a question!