Connecticut

  • February 24, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints, and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • February 23, 2024

    Conn. Justices OK $2.9M Cut To Power Co.'s Cost Recovery

    Connecticut's highest court on Friday held that state energy regulators properly trimmed a power company's annual cost recovery bid by more than $2.86 million, agreeing with a lower court that it was not arbitrary or capricious to decline to pass the expense to customers.

  • February 23, 2024

    US Gun Cos. Seek Time For Justices' Input On Mexico's Suit

    Gunmakers facing a recently revived lawsuit looking to hold them liable for firearms trafficking and cartel violence in Mexico on Friday asked a Boston federal judge to stand down and halt proceedings so the U.S. Supreme Court can have a chance to review the case.

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Nixes McCarter & English Client's Relief Bid In Fee Row

    A Connecticut federal judge rejected a bid for Second Circuit relief from a supplement company that lost a billing battle with its former lawyers at McCarter & English LLP, concluding Friday that the Connecticut Supreme Court should offer guidance on whether state law allows punitive damages awards in contract disputes.

  • February 23, 2024

    Conn. Attys Agree To Arbitrate Their Twin Conversion Claims

    Two Connecticut attorneys who sued each other over defamation, secretly accepting home improvement projects as payment for legal services and neglecting business responsibilities at a joint firm they agreed to dissolve in 2021, have dropped their dueling state court claims.

  • February 23, 2024

    Red Sox Network Exec Says 18 Mos. Enough For Billing Fraud

    A former vice president with the network that broadcasts Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins games argued Thursday that he should spend no more than 18 months in federal prison after a jury convicted him of bilking his former employer through a phony invoice scheme.

  • February 22, 2024

    Penny Stock Co. CEO Must Pay $473K Over Fraud Claims

    A Connecticut federal judge granted in part the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's motion for final judgment in a securities fraud suit against the CEO of a penny stock company, finding that a less severe punishment than requested is appropriate due to the CEO's financial situation.

  • February 22, 2024

    Conn. Embezzler Gets 2 Years For $1M Mom-And-Pop Ripoff

    The former office manager for a family-owned construction business in Connecticut must serve 24 months in prison for stealing nearly $1 million from her employer through a yearslong embezzlement scheme and failing to pay taxes on the money, a federal judge has ruled.

  • February 22, 2024

    Conn. AG Defends $10M Remedy Bid Against Nursing School

    The state of Connecticut on Thursday defended its request to collect a $10 million litigation placeholder from a shuttered nursing school, arguing state regulators were correct to take action against the troubled institution despite the school's strenuous assertions that the attorney general's office is wrong on many facts.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fired Exec Says Conn. Hospital Booted Her For Her Age

    A former Waterbury Hospital executive is suing her ex-employer in Connecticut federal court, saying it posted her job on a career site while she was on medical leave and then fired her so the CEO could "replace her with someone younger and more attractive."

  • February 22, 2024

    Kwok Owed Records About CCP Targeting, Judge Says

    A New York federal judge ordered the Justice Department to hand over evidence it possessed of the Chinese Communist Party's targeting of bankrupt and jailed Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok, but didn't require the government to hand over other evidence sought by Kwok about Chinese government targeting of his alleged victims.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fire Product Makers Try To Move PFAS Suit To Fed. Court

    A group of chemical companies that produce fire suppressants are seeking to move to federal court a suit brought by the Connecticut attorney general looking to rein in the use of PFAS chemicals, saying they are entitled to a federal forum to exercise a "government contractor" defense.

  • February 22, 2024

    Feds Can't Offset Nuclear Cleanup Bill With Trusts' Earnings

    The U.S. Department of Energy wasn't able to convince the U.S. Court of Federal Claims that nuclear utilities' high earnings on nuclear decommissioning funds should erase their $149 million damages claim against the department for delayed nuclear waste cleanup, according to an opinion made public this week.

  • February 22, 2024

    Judge Wary Of Sanctions Bid In 'Fabricated' Infant Death Suit

    A Connecticut federal judge is worried about the possible consequences of sanctioning parties who brought what one company called a "fabricated" product liability lawsuit blaming it and Target Corp. for a baby's death, expressing concern Thursday that any factual findings could interfere with the plaintiffs' right to a jury trial.

  • February 21, 2024

    39 AGs Call For Federal Pharmacy Benefit Manager Reform

    The list of critics of pharmacy benefit managers continues to grow as nearly 40 attorneys general have thrown their weight behind a trio of federal bills they say would force more transparency into an "opaque" industry that has "been a cause of rising drug prices."

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Squabble Over Emergency Review Of EPA Smog Plan

    The U.S. Supreme Court's liberal wing denounced during oral argument Wednesday their colleagues' decision to consider the merits of four related emergency requests to prevent the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from implementing a plan to reduce cross-state pollution without first getting lower court input.

  • February 21, 2024

    Salesman Accused Of AI Misuse Must Hand Over Co. Docs

    A Connecticut salesman who allegedly used the artificial intelligence application Otter to record company calls must return any of his former employer's internal documents that are still in his possession and swear that he no longer has any of the material at issue in a trade secrets lawsuit, a federal judge has ruled.

  • February 21, 2024

    Conn. Court Pauses Refund Plan For Ex-Nursing Students

    Over the objections of the Connecticut attorney general, a judge has temporarily halted a state agency's plan to refund some tuition money that students paid to the now-shuttered nursing school Stone Academy, siding with a proposed class of affected students who want to avoid waiving their legal rights in order to receive the payments.

  • February 21, 2024

    Connecticut Atty To Settle Client's Suit Over Cash Mishap

    A Connecticut lawyer who allegedly sent part of his client's $286,000 real estate transaction to a purported fraudster posing as that client with a fake email address has come to a "tentative settlement" to resolve the malpractice suit against him, new state court filings show.

  • February 21, 2024

    Feds Seek 5 Years Over Red Sox Network Exec's Billing Fraud

    Federal prosecutors are arguing for a prison sentence of more than five years for a former executive with the network that broadcasts Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins games after he was convicted of stealing more than $575,000 from the company through a sham billing scheme.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear JPMorgan Syndicated Loan Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court decided on Tuesdsay that it will not hear a dispute accusing JPMorgan Chase and other banks of failing to warn noteholders about the risks of lending money to a soon-to-be bankrupt company, keeping the case's dismissal intact after the Second Circuit ruled that the syndicated loan at the center of the case was not subject to securities laws.

  • February 20, 2024

    Conn. Judge Reluctantly Frees Snap From Sex Assault Suit

    A Connecticut state judge on Friday reluctantly ended a suit alleging Snap Inc. linked an underage girl to registered sex offenders who raped and assaulted her, quoting a First Circuit opinion that held such cases are difficult since Section 230 requires courts to deny relief "to plaintiffs whose circumstances evoke outrage."

  • February 20, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Restore Allergan Investors' Breast Implant Suit

    A Second Circuit panel on Tuesday declined to revive a class action accusing Allergan Ltd. of downplaying cancer risks linked to the company's breast implants, holding in a summary order that the investors failed to show any duty by Allergan to disclose certain information related to the alleged health concerns, or that the company made any false or misleading statements.

  • February 20, 2024

    Skipped Hearing Sinks Conn. Pot Store Fight, Court Told  

    A lawsuit seeking to revoke the approval of a cannabis retail permit in Stamford, Connecticut, cannot proceed because a coalition of anti-pot taxpayers followed the wrong process by skipping a public hearing and suing instead, the city's counsel told a state judge during an oral argument on Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    Conn. State Worker Wins $5K In Racial Hostility Claims

    Connecticut's state energy and environmental regulator is liable for the hostile work environment that a Black employee endured before and after he claimed that he found a noose near his workstation in June 2018, a federal jury has found.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

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    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • HR Antitrust Compliance Crucial Amid DOJ Scrutiny

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    The Justice Department's Antitrust Division recently announced a required human resources component for antitrust compliance programs, which means companies should evaluate their policies to prevent, detect and remediate potential violations as they add training for HR professionals, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

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    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • 4 Steps To Navigating Employee Dementia With Care

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    A recent Connecticut suit brought by an employee terminated after her managers could not reasonably accommodate her Alzheimer's-related dementia should prompt employers to plan how they can compassionately address older employees whose cognitive impairments affect their job performance, while also protecting the company from potential disability and age discrimination claims, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

  • Navigating New Regulations In Healthcare And Other M&A

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    While notice requirements recently enacted in several states are focused on the healthcare industry for now, this trend could extend to other industries as these requirements are designed to allow regulators to be a step ahead and learn more about a transaction long before it occurs, say Kathleen Premo and Ashley Creech at Epstein Becker.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

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