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Corporate

  • June 19, 2019

    Facebook's Libra Prepared To Counter Privacy Concerns

    Scrutiny of Facebook’s new cryptocurrency Libra is expected to be intense, but experts say early regulatory inspection, a carefully designed governance system and a slate of established partners put the digital token on solid footing.

  • June 19, 2019

    Microsoft, Tech Giants Oppose Trump Tablet, Laptop Tariffs

    Microsoft Corp., Dell Technologies, HP Inc. and Intel Corp. joined forces Wednesday to oppose the Trump administration's proposal to include tablets and laptop computers in its list of Chinese goods targeted for tariffs.

  • June 19, 2019

    NLRB Can't Shut Down 'Scabby'-Aided Protest

    A Brooklyn federal judge on Wednesday denied a National Labor Relations Board official’s request that he stifle a labor protest at several Staten Island supermarkets, rejecting the board’s bid to deflate well-known protest symbol Scabby the Rat.

  • June 19, 2019

    Nokia Names New Top Attys As CLO Departs For ABB

    Nokia will elevate its current deputy chief legal officer and its head of patent business to the respective roles of chief legal officer and Nokia Technologies president, following the departure of the company's legal head, who will serve as ABB's general counsel, the technology companies announced Wednesday.

  • June 19, 2019

    McDonald's 'Gotcha' Tactics Backfire In Ind. Child Injury Suit

    An Indiana appellate court on Wednesday revived a suit accusing McDonald's of partly causing a 10-year-old child to suffer injuries after he fell from a broken stool, saying the fast-food giant's "gotcha" litigation tactics do not warrant a dismissal of claims.

  • June 19, 2019

    USTR Up To Restart Talks With China As Tariff Threat Looms

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said on Wednesday that the U.S. would be willing to restart negotiations with China, as President Donald Trump prepares to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the upcoming G-20 Summit.

  • June 19, 2019

    Closing Gaps In GILTI Opens Up Authority Questions

    Recent rules on the international provisions of 2017's tax law attempt to resolve gaps and contradictions in the legislation's framework for global intangible low-taxed income — and in doing so, raise questions about whether they exceed regulatory authority.

  • June 19, 2019

    USTR Says Mexico's NAFTA 2.0 Labor Rules Can Be Enforced

    U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer assured lawmakers Wednesday morning that Mexico would honor its newly passed labor laws as required by the renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement, as House Democrats pressed the trade ambassador on how this new version of the trilateral deal would be enforced.

  • June 19, 2019

    BofA Workers' Suit Crumbles; Judge Slams 'Silly' Calif. Law

    A California federal judge said Wednesday he was leaning against certifying a class of Bank of America workers who claim they were misclassified as exempt from overtime pay, while at the same time criticizing elements of the state's employment law as "silly" and "arbitrary."

  • June 19, 2019

    Chamber Fights 'Devastating' Association Health Plan Ruling

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has urged the D.C. Circuit to breathe new life into a Trump administration rule that made it easier for small businesses to join together to create health plans that aren't subject to certain Affordable Care Act requirements.

  • June 19, 2019

    Happy Birthday! What We Know As Alice Turns 5

    Five years ago this week, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that four patents directed to a computerized trading platform were invalid. The decision would be a bombshell, reshaping patent litigation and leading to the invalidation of scores of patents.

  • June 19, 2019

    Delta's Privacy Policy Isn't A Contract, Judge Says

    A California federal judge took down the latest complaint against Delta and its online ticket provider by a flyer whose information was exposed in a massive 2017 data breach, finding her claims are based on a policy Delta flat-out states on its tickets is not binding.

  • June 19, 2019

    SEC Fights Ex-Xerox CFO's Bid To Lift 16-Year-Old Gag Order

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission challenged a bid by a former Xerox executive to lift a gag order in his 16-year-old settlement with the agency, telling a New York federal court Tuesday that the man waived his First Amendment rights when he agreed to the consent judgment.

  • June 19, 2019

    For European GCs, It's More Strategy And Fewer Admin Duties

    More European legal departments are splitting strategic and administrative responsibilities into two different roles by shifting the management of legal operations to dedicated staff members, which frees up general counsel to focus on other priorities, according to a report released Wednesday.

  • June 19, 2019

    Cox Inks $10.75M Deal To End Debt Collection Robocall Suit

    Cox Communications Inc. has agreed to pay nearly $11 million to get itself off the business end of a class action accusing it of making illegal robocalls in order to collect customer debts, an Arizona federal court was told.

  • June 19, 2019

    Unequal Pay Top Of Mind For Women In Law

    The gender pay gap in law is persistent and is among the biggest obstacles to equality in the profession, according to a report released Wednesday based on input from more than 700 women who practice law across the globe.

  • June 18, 2019

    Nreal Ripped Off Magic Leap's AR Glasses Design, Suit Says

    Augmented reality startup Magic Leap has accused competitor Nreal and its founder of trying to take a "free ride" on Magic Leap's design for wearable AR technology in order to speed up the development of its own Nreal Light glasses, according to a suit filed Monday in California federal court.

  • June 18, 2019

    Cos. Report Changes In Harassment Policies Amid #MeToo

    Most major companies have changed their anti-harassment policies or training since the #MeToo movement took hold in late 2017, but they're split on whether they’ve seen broader shifts in workplace culture, according to a survey of compliance, legal and other in-house professionals released Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2019

    Facebook's Cryptocurrency Immediately In Legislators' Sights

    Facebook announced Tuesday its intention to launch its cryptocurrency Libra, which aims to target the 1.7 billion global unbanked population by creating a global digital currency, facing immediate pushback from U.S. legislators and European officials.

  • June 18, 2019

    Del. Justices Revive Investor's Blue Bell Listeria Suit

    The Delaware Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that a Blue Bell Creameries USA investor has shown that it's plausible to suggest the company’s officers may have failed to enact measures to protect ice cream products in connection with a deadly listeria outbreak in 2015.

  • June 18, 2019

    Cannabis Co. Leafly Adds Ex-Getty Images GC As Its Top Atty

    A Seattle-based web platform that educates users about cannabis has named as its general counsel an attorney who previously served as general counsel and senior vice president at Getty Images, the startup announced Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2019

    Ex-CVS Exec's Move To Amazon Pharmacy Barred By Judge

    A Rhode Island federal judge scolded a former executive of CVS’ drug middleman service Tuesday for jumping ship to Amazon’s mail-order drug unit, saying the move violated his noncompete agreement with the pharmaceutical giant.

  • June 18, 2019

    SEC Mulls Opening Private Offerings To A Wider Audience

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday requested input on potential changes surrounding its regulation of private offerings, including whether rules should be eased to allow more individuals to invest in riskier securities that are normally limited to wealthy individuals.

  • June 18, 2019

    Debt Collection Co. Files Ch. 11 After Health Data Breach

    The parent company of a billing collections firm that has been blamed for a breach that exposed personal data from 11.9 million Quest Diagnostics Inc. patients has filed for Chapter 11 protection in New York bankruptcy court, citing the consequences of the breach.

  • June 18, 2019

    Was A $5M Fine Just The Cost Of Closing A $6B Deal?

    When the Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice announced that Canon and Toshiba would pay $2.5 million each to settle allegations they deliberately skirted obligations to report Canon's $6 billion purchase of Toshiba Medical Systems, the agencies pronounced it a stern warning to others who might be tempted to close mergers without providing the obligatory disclosure.

Expert Analysis

  • A Common Thread In High Court Bankruptcy Cases This Term

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    While the two significant bankruptcy cases from this U.S. Supreme Court term — Taggart v. Lorenzen and Mission Product Holdings v. Tempnology — may appear to involve entirely separate issues, there is a similarity in the cases that could illuminate something important about how the court views bankruptcy law, says Craig Goldblatt of WilmerHale.

  • Illinois Law On Job Interview AI: What Employers Must Note

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    Illinois recently passed a law targeting employers' use of artificial intelligence in job interview videos, making it the first state to legislate the use of AI in the employment context. However, several ambiguities pose potential compliance challenges, says Gary Clark at Quarles & Brady.

  • Key Differences In Nev. And Calif. Data Privacy Laws

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    Nevada’s recently enacted Senate Bill 220 gives state residents a broad right to opt out of the sale of their personal information. Companies currently preparing for the California Consumer Privacy Act cannot assume that CCPA compliance equates to compliance with S.B. 220, say Sadia Mirza and Yanni Lin at Troutman Sanders.

  • What Employers Can Expect From NLRB's New Reg Agenda

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    The National Labor Relations Board recently outlined its rulemaking priorities. From union election "blocking charges" to standards for determining joint employer status, Lori Armstrong Halber at Reed Smith discusses the important details from each agenda item.

  • 9th Circ. Got Cost-Sharing Right In Altera V. Commissioner

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    The problem underlying the Ninth Circuit’s recent Altera v. Commissioner decision is one that has long bedeviled courts considering how multinational companies should share tax costs: how to determine what unrelated parties would have done at arm’s length when comparables cannot be found, says Reuven Avi-Yonah at the University of Michigan.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Can Improve Their Job Interviews

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    When evaluating potential new hires, law firms should utilize structured interviews in order to create a consistent rating system that accurately and effectively assesses candidates' skills and competencies, says Jennifer Henderson of Major Lindsey.

  • False Ad Insights From Bud Light 'Corn Syrup' Case

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    A Wisconsin federal court’s recent decision against Bud Light manufacturer Anheuser for its corn syrup-focused ad campaign targeting MillerCoors serves as an important reminder that even truthful statements may cross the line into misleading territory — and adds to the developing body of law surrounding comparative advertising claims about food ingredients, say attorneys at Finnegan.

  • Employer Options For White Collar Contractors After Dynamex

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    Though multiple worker classification questions still swirl around the California Supreme Court's Dynamex decision, many have wondered what it means for white collar independent contractors. The law is still murky on this point, but there are several steps that might help hiring companies rebut a misclassification claim, say Raymond Bertrand and James de Haan at Paul Hastings.

  • Considerations In Protecting Trade Secrets During Litigation

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    A cursory review of 2019 case law shows that reliance on protective orders in discovery is on the rise throughout the U.S. Careful attention should be directed to how such an order is structured, what sensitive business information it covers, and how the covered information can be used in the litigation, say Cabell Clay and Jared Nobles of Moore & Van Allen.

  • SEC Proposes Welcome Streamlining Of M&A Disclosures

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission recently proposed extensive changes to financial disclosure requirements under Regulation S-X for business acquisitions and dispositions. These changes should further simplify line-item disclosures with respect to capital formation, and reduce the time and expense associated with preparing them, say attorneys at Skadden. 

  • Wash. Noncompete Reform: What Employers Need To Know

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    Washington recently enacted a law that will make it more difficult for employers to enforce noncompete agreements. Alicia Feichtmeir and Steven Peltin at Foster Pepper discuss key takeaways and open questions that may require litigation or legislative fixes.

  • How To Streamline Virtual Law Team Mass Tort Defense

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    A primary benefit of the virtual law team in mass tort litigation is creative collaboration. A "company case" approach is essential to breaking down the silos between team members, say attorneys at FaegreBD and Reed Smith.

  • The State Of Article III Standing 3 Years After Spokeo

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    Three years after the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark consumer privacy decision in Spokeo v. Robins, Mary-Christine Sungaila and Marco Pulido at Haynes and Boone examine how courts have applied the opinion, the role of congressional findings in Article III standing cases, and a developing litigation trend.

  • What's Ahead For LGBTQ Rights Legislation

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    The U.S. House of Representatives recently passed the Equality Act to amend various civil rights laws for explicit inclusion of sexual orientation and gender identity as protected characteristics. However, critics have raised several concerns and the bill faces tougher odds in the Senate, say Jason Brown and Robert Quackenboss at Hunton.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.