Employment

  • April 08, 2024

    Workers Oppose X Corp.'s Bid To Stall $500M Severance Suit

    Two workers asked a California federal court to deny a request from X, formerly Twitter, to pause discovery in their suit alleging it stiffed employees on $500 million in severance pay when it conducted mass layoffs following Elon Musk's takeover, saying the move will create unnecessary delay.

  • April 08, 2024

    Teamsters Benefits Row Isn't Arbitrable, Sysco Tells 7th Circ.

    An Indiana federal judge correctly held that a Sysco distribution center in Indianapolis didn't have to arbitrate a dispute with a Teamsters local over workers' entitlement to early retirement benefits, the company has told the Seventh Circuit, asking the appellate court to uphold the judge's ruling. 

  • April 08, 2024

    Drexel Didn't Accommodate Exec's Disability, Suit Claims

    Drexel University was accused Monday of discrimination by an administrator, who claimed its chief operating officer refused her request to meet one-on-one ahead of a group meeting with a subordinate and that the group meeting be held via telephone instead of video.

  • April 08, 2024

    Ex-USPS Worker Can Proceed With Disability Suit

    An Illinois federal judge refused to toss an ex-worker's lawsuit against the U.S. Postal Service, saying she had enough evidence to get her claim that she was denied overtime because of a wrist injury before a jury, but failed to show that age discrimination was at play.

  • April 08, 2024

    8th Circ. Upholds NLRB's Broad Remedies Against Meat Co.

    The Eighth Circuit on Monday upheld a National Labor Relations Board decision finding a meat processor in Nebraska illegally bargained in bad faith with a United Food and Commercial Workers affiliate, backing the board's broad remedies order that included reimbursing the union for negotiating expenses.

  • April 08, 2024

    McMahon Sells Millions More In TKO Stock Amid Abuse Suit

    WWE's disgraced founder Vince McMahon, who was recently accused of trafficking a former employee, continues to loosen his grip on the wrestling company he founded, most recently selling $311 million worth of stock in WWE's parent, according to a Monday securities filing.

  • April 08, 2024

    Conn. Worker Says Firing For Talking Wages Was Illegal

    A former employee of a company that designs and manufactures radiation detection devices accused the firm in Connecticut federal court of breaching state law by prohibiting him from discussing his pay with his colleagues and of firing him for telling a friend about receiving a raise.

  • April 08, 2024

    'Flagrant' $8.6M Embezzlement Scheme Nets 6-Year Sentence

    A former office manager who was caught stealing more than $8.6 million from the trucking logistics company where she worked was sentenced to six years in prison on Monday in Georgia federal court. 

  • April 08, 2024

    Ex-Paralegal Launches Whistleblower Suit Against NJ Firm

    An ex-paralegal at New Jersey personal injury law firm Brandon J. Broderick LLC says his former employer created an uncomfortable work place when he reported alleged ethical violations to management.

  • April 08, 2024

    Seyfarth Bolsters Dallas Shop With Hunton Employment Ace

    Seyfarth Shaw LLP has expanded the labor and employment department in its Dallas office after opening the office late last year, bringing on a former longtime Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP partner to serve as its founding L&E partner in the North Texas city, the firm announced on Monday.

  • April 08, 2024

    Jackson Hewitt Preparers Want First OK On $10.8M Deal

    Former Jackson Hewitt Inc. workers have reached a $10.8 million settlement with their former employer over claims the company's franchisees entered into an anti-competitive no-poach agreement despite the provision being removed from the company's franchise agreements, according to a Friday motion.

  • April 08, 2024

    Doctors Say MSU Vax Mandate Suit Needs High Court Review

    Three doctors urged the U.S. Supreme Court to take up a case challenging Michigan State University's vaccine mandate after the Sixth Circuit backed the suit's dismissal, arguing that the circuit court should have applied a stricter standard when considering whether the government could interfere with patients' medical decisions.

  • April 08, 2024

    Male Worker Says Female Colleague's Grudge Got Him Fired

    A financial services firm abruptly fired a sales producer without any investigation after a female colleague who wanted him gone made false accusations about him, the producer said in a suit filed in Texas federal court.

  • April 05, 2024

    Sean Combs Named In Suit Alleging Yacht Sex Assault By Son

    Sean "Diddy" Combs and his son, Christian Combs, were sued Thursday in California state court by a woman alleging the younger Combs sexually assaulted her aboard a yacht while she was working as a stewardess, and that there is an audio recording of part of the incident.

  • April 05, 2024

    Texas Univ. Coach Says Sexual Orientation Led To Firing

    A University of Texas at Rio Grande Valley assistant tennis coach has accused the school in federal court of letting her go after a "sham investigation" because she is gay.

  • April 05, 2024

    Neb. Beef Seller Says No Proof It Joined Wage-Fixing Scheme

    A Colorado federal judge gave a Nebraska beef wholesaler another chance to petition for dismissal from a class action accusing it of participating in a meat industry wage-fixing scheme, after the company filed a motion that didn't follow the court's page limit.

  • April 05, 2024

    Tesla Workers Skipped Breaks To Meet Quotas, Suit Says

    Two former warehouse workers hit Tesla with a proposed wage and hour class action Thursday in California federal court, alleging the electric carmaker violated labor laws by not providing sufficient break time, operating an illegal quota system and failing to pay all of their wages.

  • April 05, 2024

    Starbucks Tells Judge Union Dealings Aren't 'Mission Critical'

    Starbucks denied Friday that complying with federal labor law was "mission critical" to its business as it urged a Washington state judge to dismiss a shareholder suit accusing company leaders of union busting, which they say tanked Starbucks' reputation.

  • April 05, 2024

    NBC, Bravo Accused Of Racism By 'Vanderpump Rules' Alum

    "Vanderpump Rules" alumnus Faith Stowers sued NBC, Evolution Media and Bravo for discrimination and retaliation in California state court Friday, alleging she was threatened with legal action when she tried to speak up about the ill-treatment she suffered during taping, including racist slurs and having a knife brandished at her.

  • April 05, 2024

    Texas Appeals Court Reverses IT Consulting Worker Spat

    A Texas appeals court revived a suit brought by an information technology consulting company against its former worker, ruling that the company had shown enough evidence to go forward with the case and the trial court abused its discretion in granting a no-evidence summary judgment motion.

  • April 05, 2024

    NJ Smoking Law Violates Casino Workers' Rights, UAW Says

    A law preventing smoking in certain indoor workspaces violates New Jersey's Constitution by excluding casino workers, the United Auto Workers alleged Friday in a state court suit against the governor and state health department commissioner.

  • April 05, 2024

    Beverage Giant Sued Under Illinois Genetic Privacy Law

    Reyes Holdings, the largest beer distributor in the United States, has been sued in Illinois state court by a proposed class of job applicants who claim their genetic privacy rights were violated when they were required to submit to physical exams and inquiries about their family medical history as a condition of employment at the beverage distributor or its subsidiaries.

  • April 05, 2024

    Employment Authority: Gig Companies Go On Defense

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with coverage on what risks gig companies could face as they threaten to pull their apps from cities that add minimum wage requirements for gig workers, how employees' activities on social media are raising complex legal questions for employers, and why experts think federal law could preempt statutes passed by Southern states baring businesses that receive state economic incentives from voluntarily recognizing unions.

  • April 05, 2024

    11th Circ. Upholds College's Win In Student's Disability Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday upheld Morehouse School of Medicine's win in a former student's suit claiming it failed to accommodate his disability by providing inadequate note-taking services, ruling that the Georgia federal court made no error in finding that the school had provided adequate accommodations.

  • April 05, 2024

    School District Seeks To Knock Out Teachers' Equal Pay Suit

    A school district asked a Pennsylvania federal judge Friday to toss or at least decertify a collective action alleging it paid male teachers more than women who had similar experience, arguing that the workers couldn't show they had enough in common to justify a group action.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Ways To Hone Deposition Skills And Improve Results

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Depositions must never be taken for granted in the preparations needed to win a dispositive motion or a trial, and five best practices, including knowing when to hire a videographer, can significantly improve outcomes, says James Argionis at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • Navigating Trade Secret Litigation In A High-Stakes Landscape

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    Recent eye-popping verdicts are becoming increasingly common in trade secret litigation — but employers can take several proactive steps to protect proprietary information and defend against misappropriation accusations in order to avoid becoming the next headline, say Jessica Mason and Jack FitzGerald at Foley & Lardner.

  • Opinion

    UK Whistleblowers Flock To The US For Good Reason

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    The U.K. Serious Fraud Office director recently brought renewed attention to the differences between the U.K. and U.S. whistleblower regimes — differences that may make reporting to U.S. agencies a better and safer option for U.K. whistleblowers, and show why U.K. whistleblower laws need to be improved, say Benjamin Calitri and Kate Reeves at Kohn Kohn.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

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    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Opinion

    There Is No NCAA Supremacy Clause, Especially For NIL

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    A recent Tennessee federal court ruling illustrates the NCAA's problematic position that its member schools should violate state law rather than its rules — and the organization's legal history with the dormant commerce clause raises a fundamental constitutional issue that will have to be resolved before attorneys can navigate NIL with confidence, says Patrick O’Donnell at HWG.

  • Employer Pointers As Wage And Hour AI Risks Emerge

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    Following the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence, employers using or considering artificial intelligence tools should carefully assess whether such use could increase their exposure to liability under federal and state wage and hour laws, and be wary of algorithmic discrimination, bias and inaccurate or incomplete reporting, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • The Pros And Cons Of Protecting AI As Trade Secrets

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    Despite regulatory trends toward greater transparency of artificial intelligence models, federal policy acknowledges, and perhaps endorses, trade secret protection for AI information, but there are still hurdles in keeping AI information a secret, say Jennifer Maisel and Andrew Stewart at Rothwell Figg.

  • Complying With Enforcers' Ephemeral Messaging Guidance

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    Given federal antitrust enforcers’ recently issued guidance on ephemeral messaging applications, organizations must take a proactive approach to preserving short-lived communications — or risk criminal obstruction charges and civil discovery sanctions, say attorneys at Manatt.

  • Race Bias Defense Considerations After 11th Circ. Ruling

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    In Tynes v. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed that the McDonnell Douglas test for employment discrimination cases is merely an evidentiary framework, so employers relying on it as a substantive standard of liability may need to rethink their litigation strategy, says Helen Jay at Phelps Dunbar.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • How Echoing Techniques Can Derail Witnesses At Deposition

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    Before depositions, defense attorneys must prepare witnesses to recognize covert echoing techniques that may be used by opposing counsel to lower their defenses and elicit sensitive information — potentially leading to nuclear settlements and verdicts, say Bill Kanasky and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • 6 Ways To Minimize Risk, Remain Respectful During Layoffs

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    With a recent Resume Builder survey finding that 38% of companies expect to lay off employees this year, now is a good time for employers to review several strategies that can help mitigate legal risks and maintain compassion in the reduction-in-force process, says Sahara Pynes at Fox Rothschild.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • NYC Workplace AI Regulation Has Been Largely Insignificant

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    Though a Cornell University study suggests that a New York City law intended to regulate artificial intelligence in the workplace has had an underwhelming impact, the law may still help shape the city's future AI regulation efforts, say Reid Skibell and Nathan Ades at Glenn Agre.

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