Environmental

  • February 16, 2024

    Mayer Brown Denies Knowing Of 'Disturbing' Flint PR Effort

    A Mayer Brown LLP partner representing Veolia North America, the water engineering firm facing negligence claims from children exposed to lead in Flint, Michigan, told a Michigan federal judge Friday that his team didn't know about Veolia's public relations campaign disparaging the children's counsel, a campaign the judge labeled a "disturbing development."

  • February 16, 2024

    6th Circ. Rejects FirstEnergy Objector's Appeal In $180M Case

    The Sixth Circuit on Friday rejected an appeal from a FirstEnergy investor who was holding up a $180 million settlement in a derivative suit seeking to hold the utility company responsible for its involvement in a $1 billion bribery scandal.

  • February 16, 2024

    Hydro Co. Must Alter, Not Remove, Dam That's Killing Salmon

    A Washington federal judge on Friday said a hydroelectric company must remove part of a rock dam structure killing endangered wild salmon, but the judge declined to order complete removal, saying it went beyond a narrowly tailored remedy zeroing in on what is harming fish.

  • February 16, 2024

    Oat Milk Co. Settles Greenwashing Investor Suit For $9.25M

    Investors suing Swedish alternative milk manufacturer Oatly asked a New York federal judge Friday to preliminarily approve a $9.25 million deal to settle claims that the company pitched its business as more environmentally friendly than it is.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    FERC Rejects Hydro Project Permits Amid Tribal Opposition

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has denied preliminary permits for three proposed hydropower projects on Navajo Nation land in Arizona, saying a recently revised policy clarifying Indigenous rights in the agency's decision-making process and the tribe's overwhelming opposition to the applications swayed the decision.

  • February 16, 2024

    Clean Energy Cos. Must Pay Heed To PFAS Crackdown

    The clean energy industry shouldn't downplay the growing scrutiny over so-called forever chemicals, many of which are present in key components of their projects and can't be easily replaced, attorneys say.

  • February 16, 2024

    Canada Liable Under NAFTA For Axed LNG Project, Co. Says

    A U.S. company that invested at least $120 million in a since-thwarted liquefied natural gas project maintained that Canada is liable for $1 billion in damages for breaches of the North American Free Trade Agreement, and that the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes has jurisdiction over its claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Florida Loses Wetland Permitting Authority In D.C. Court Case

    A D.C. judge has stripped Florida of its federally delegated authority to permit wetlands development, ruling that U.S. environmental regulators failed to analyze the impact of their decision on endangered and threatened species and handing a victory to conservation groups challenging the program.

  • February 16, 2024

    Gov't Wants More Alaskan Native Reps On Subsistence Board

    The U.S. government has plans to strengthen Alaskan Native tribal representation on its Federal Subsistence Board, saying the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have proposed a new rule to add board members with personal experience of subsistence living in rural Alaska.

  • February 16, 2024

    Feds Tell 1st Circ. Mass. Wind Farm Approval Was Sound

    The federal government has said a Massachusetts federal judge properly dumped a challenge lodged by commercial fishing groups seeking to upend federal approvals of the Vineyard Wind project, telling the First Circuit that the record shows federal agencies thoroughly studied the project's potential impacts.

  • February 16, 2024

    4th Circ. Won't Revive Car Dealer's Hurricane Coverage Suit

    The Fourth Circuit declined to revive a South Carolina car dealership's lawsuit seeking coverage from an AIG unit for losses the business sustained from Hurricane Dorian in 2019, agreeing with a district court that there was no link between a government evacuation order and physical damage that would warrant civil authority coverage.

  • February 16, 2024

    Camp Lejeune Plaintiffs Seek Appeal Of Jury Trial Denial

    Two plaintiffs suing the federal government over water contamination at Camp Lejeune are asking a North Carolina federal court to allow them to appeal a judges' decision striking their bid for a jury trial, saying the issue is a novel question of law that should be answered sooner rather than later.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fruit Grower Gets OK For $11M DIP Draw After Lender Deal

    Bankrupt fruit producer Prima Wawona received interim approval Friday for an $11 million draw on its $22 million in Chapter 11 financing after saying it had reached a deal with objecting lenders on the financing and was working on a deal for its overall bankruptcy plan.

  • February 16, 2024

    Barge Co., Insurer End Pollution Cleanup Coverage Fight

    A Washington barge company and its insurer reached an agreement in a dispute over coverage of legal expenses stemming from claims that the company was liable for environmental pollution at an EPA cleanup site, according to a notice filed in Washington federal court.

  • February 15, 2024

    NorCal Roundup Suit Faces Dismissal Or Transfer To MDL

    A Northern California federal judge said Thursday he'll either dismiss a proposed nationwide class action over Roundup exposure or transfer it to multidistrict litigation in California's Central District, saying, "It seems obvious that [plaintiffs] filed it in the wrong court."

  • February 15, 2024

    Humane Society's Poultry Slaughter Suit May Need An Update

    A California federal magistrate judge on Thursday told the Humane Society and other nonprofits suing the U.S. Department of Agriculture for waiving limits on the pace of poultry slaughtering that they may need to file an amended complaint due to new regulations implemented since the suit was filed.

  • February 15, 2024

    Enviro Orgs Sue EPA Over PFAS Data For Plastic Containers

    Two environmental groups accused the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday of withholding test data on the presence of forever chemicals in fluorinated plastic containers in response to their Freedom of Information Act request.

  • February 15, 2024

    FERC Churn Won't Impact Grid Policy Push, Chair Says

    A looming commissioner departure that could leave the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission without enough members to fully function is not affecting efforts to finalize a long-awaited overhaul of the agency's electric transmission planning policies, Chair Willie Phillips said Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Conn. Justice Calls Marriott Lien Fight 'An Embarrassment'

    A "bizarre" appeal that seeks the discharge of a sewer assessment lien on a Marriott hotel property is "a waste of everybody's time," a Connecticut Supreme Court justice said Thursday amid oral argument.

  • February 15, 2024

    DOI Inks Klamath Basin Agreement With Tribes, Water Users

    The U.S. Department of the Interior said it has struck an agreement that will see water users and tribes work together in a push to improve the environment and water supplies in the drought-prone Klamath River Basin of southern Oregon and northern California, pledging $72 million for projects.

  • February 15, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Says Feds Didn't Coerce Mont. Coal Permit Denial

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday said the Court of Federal Claims correctly threw out a coal leaser's suit alleging the federal government prevented it from acquiring necessary state operating permits, saying the company has failed to establish Montana was coerced into denying the permits.

  • February 15, 2024

    Stanford Prof Must Pay Atty Fees In Dropped Defamation Suit

    A Stanford University professor who sued critics of his renewable energy research must pay more than $500,000 in attorney fees despite dropping the litigation, the D.C. Court of Appeals ruled Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    Wash. Judge Says Tribes Can Seek River Pollution Damages

    A Washington federal judge denied a Teck Resources Ltd. unit's bid for summary judgment on natural resource damages claims that the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and state of Washington lodged over decades of Upper Columbia River pollution from a smelter in Trail, British Columbia, setting up the matter for a possible trial.

Expert Analysis

  • What One Litigator Learned Serving On A Jury

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    Kilpatrick attorney April Isaacson shares insights for trial lawyers from her recent experience serving on a jury for the first time, including lessons about the impact of frequent sidebars, considerations for using demonstratives, the importance of clear jury instructions, and the unconscious habits that can drive jurors mad.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: South Africa

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    While South Africa has yet to mandate the reporting of nonfinancial and environmental, social, and corporate governance issues, policy documents and recent legislative developments are likely to have a material impact in the country's transition to a low-carbon economy and in meeting its international obligations, say Glynn Kent at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

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    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • Environmental Justice: A 2023 Recap And 2024 Forecast

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    A 2023 executive order directing each federal agency to make environmental justice part of its mission, as well as the many lawsuits and enforcement actions last year, demonstrates that EJ will increasingly surface in all areas of law and regulation, from technically challenging to seemingly ordinary permitting and construction matters, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • Food And Beverage Policy Trends Cos. Should Track In 2024

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    The list of legal issues food and beverage companies should watch out for in 2024 include the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Human Foods Program, the Food Safety and Inspection Service’s salmonella proposal, Proposition 12 and more, say Bob Hibbert and Amaru Sánchez at Wiley.

  • How 2023 Shaped Drug And Medical Device Legal Trends

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    2023 brought a number of positive developments for the life sciences industry, including great trial and multidistrict litigation outcomes, but also some heavy-handed regulations and other concerning developments that lay the groundwork for significant litigation, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Opinion

    What Insurers Gain When Litigating Coverage Denials

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    Lately, insurance companies have denied coverage for lawsuits alleging liability relating to the ordinary operations of highly regulated businesses, such as those in the pharmaceutical and energy sectors — demonstrating time and again how litigation can be a vehicle for carriers to mitigate their own costs, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

  • After Headwinds, 2024 May See Offshore Wind Momentum

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    Despite skyrocketing raw material costs, conflicting state and federal policies, and other setbacks for the offshore wind sector in 2023, the industry appears poised for growth in the coming year, with improving economics, more flexible procurement procedures and increasing legislative support, say Emily Huggins Jones and Ben Cowan at Locke Lord.

  • 5 Trends That Will Affect Food Litigation In 2024

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    In 2024, food and beverage companies are likely to continue to face threats of litigation relating to so-called forever chemicals, citric and malic acid, and ESG claims, but recent developments in case law have created potential avenues for defense, say Abby Meyer and Khirin Bunker at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 10 Issues To Watch As ESG Remains Alive And Well In 2024

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    Practitioners and stakeholders should watch a number of key environmental, social and corporate governance issues in the new year, including court rulings and comprehensive research, as the data shows ESG is here to stay, says Heidi Friedman at Thompson Hine.

  • Law Firm Strategies For Successfully Navigating 2024 Trends

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    Though law firms face the dual challenge of external and internal pressures as they enter 2024, firms willing to pivot will be able to stand out by adapting to stakeholder needs and reimagining their infrastructure, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Consultants.

  • Top 10 Employer Resolutions For 2024

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    From technological leaps to sea changes in labor policy to literal sea changes, 2024 provides opportunities for employers to face big-picture questions that will shape their business for years to come, say Allegra Lawrence-Hardy and Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.

  • The Most-Read Legal Industry Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

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    A range of legal industry topics drew readers' attention in Law360's Expert Analysis section this year, from associate retention strategies to ethical billing practices.

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