Florida

  • June 30, 2022

    Miami-Dade Hails $100M, New Efforts To Tackle Housing Crisis

    A couple of days after the country's top housing official tagged Miami as the "epicenter" of the national housing crisis, area leaders unveiled new initiatives and outside funding of up to $100 million from a nonprofit during an event Thursday that highlighted its multipronged efforts to address the situation.

  • June 30, 2022

    Fla. Payday Lender To Pay $39M In SEC Investment Fraud Suit

    A Florida federal judge entered final judgment in favor of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission after a Miami payday loan company agreed to pay more than $39 million to resolve claims it fraudulently raised $66 million from more than 500 investors.

  • June 30, 2022

    DOJ Charges 3 Fla. Men With Running $100M Crypto Scheme

    The U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday it charged three men who ran a purported hedge fund in Florida with wire fraud and securities fraud for allegedly generating $100 million in a cryptocurrency-based Ponzi scheme.

  • June 30, 2022

    Big Tech Common Carrier Fight Teed Up With Justices In Sight

    The stage may be set for a landmark First Amendment ruling tailored for the digital age after the Eleventh Circuit paused its recent order partially blocking a Florida law that prohibits social media companies from blocking political candidates.

  • June 30, 2022

    American Airlines Gets Cuban Airport Lawsuit Tossed

    A judge on Thursday dismissed a federal lawsuit filed by a Miami man who accused American Airlines Inc. of illegally benefiting from use of an airport he said the Cuban government stole from his family in 1959.

  • June 30, 2022

    SPLC Objections To ICE Facility Report Found 'Unconvincing'

    A D.C. federal judge on Thursday denied the Southern Poverty Law Center's bid to reject a court-appointed monitor report on U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's compliance with an order to improve detainee attorney access, saying the monitor's findings were sufficient.

  • June 30, 2022

    Pa. Co. Says Distributor Lied To Land $5.5M COVID Test Deal

    A Florida company misrepresented itself as an authorized wholesaler of at-home COVID-19 tests to secure a $5.5 million order from a Pennsylvania health and safety supplier, according to a lawsuit filed in federal court Thursday.

  • June 30, 2022

    Judge Won't Toss Late Hurricane Irma Damage Claim

    A Florida federal judge refused to toss a Hurricane Irma-related homeowners insurance case against a Hartford unit, finding that while the homeowners didn't provide timely notice, the insurer still needed to show the delay made a difference in how it handled the claim.

  • June 30, 2022

    Judge Told Not To DQ Troutman Pepper In Dunkin' TM Row

    A company accusing Dunkin' Brands Group of trademark infringement over a plant-based sausage product asked a Florida federal judge on Wednesday to deny the restaurant company's bid to disqualify Troutman Pepper from representing it, saying Dunkin' cannot use the mere presence of a common in-house legal department to deprive the company of its chosen counsel.

  • June 30, 2022

    'Big Bang Theory' Star Wins Ban On Fake CBD Endorsement

    A Florida federal judge agreed to block dozens of websites and online markets from attaching actor Mayim Bialik's name to their CBD products, less than two weeks after she said her name was being used without her permission to create the false impression that she endorses them.

  • June 30, 2022

    Staffing Co. Says No New Classes Belong In Fla. Wage Suit

    A staffing company urged a Florida federal judge to reject its day laborers' bid to certify two additional classes in litigation alleging the business overcharged workers for transportation to job sites and failed to pay them for time waiting for assignments, saying the judge's initial holding was correct.

  • June 30, 2022

    11th Circ. Affirms Munich's Win In Reinsurance Dispute

    Munich Reinsurance America Inc. has no duty to reimburse a Florida intergovernmental risk management company for its coverage of an insured in an underlying suit, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed after refusing to apply a follow-the-fortunes clause that did not appear in the parties' reinsurance agreement.

  • June 30, 2022

    Spirit Deal Up In The Air After Shareholder Meeting Delayed

    Spirit Airlines said Wednesday it is postponing until July 8 a shareholder meeting on whether to approve its pending $6.6 billion merger with Frontier Airlines Inc., a move welcomed by JetBlue, which is seeking its own tie-up with Spirit.

  • June 30, 2022

    Fla. Judge Says 15-Week Abortion Ban Is Unconstitutional

    A Florida judge on Thursday issued a temporary injunction blocking the implementation of a new ban on abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, ruling that the law violates the right to privacy in the Florida Constitution.

  • June 30, 2022

    GrayRobinson Adds Business Law Shareholder In Orlando

    GrayRobinson PA added a new shareholder to its Orlando office who is a 30-year veteran of Lowndes Drosdick Doster Kantor & Reed PA.

  • June 29, 2022

    Fla. Physical Therapy Clinic Workers Sentenced For Fraud

    Five individuals purportedly involved in an $8 million health care fraud scheme at a Florida physical therapy clinic have received varying prison sentences and were ordered to pay millions of dollars in restitution, the U.S. Department of Justice said Wednesday.

  • June 29, 2022

    Fla. Judge Tosses Class Suit Over Massage Spa Surveillance

    A Florida federal judge on Tuesday ended a proposed class suit against Vero Beach police detectives who surveilled a massage parlor targeted in a prostitution sting, ruling that there is no legal reason for them not to be entitled to a qualified immunity defense and that "to hold otherwise would defy all sense of logic."

  • June 29, 2022

    5th Circ. Denies Texas Co.'s New Take In Manager Visa Suit

    The Fifth Circuit said a Texas company could not present fresh arguments when it affirmed a lower court decision finding that the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services was right to deny the company's employment-based visa application for an employee.

  • June 29, 2022

    PTAB Judges 'Confused' By Arguments In Wireless IP Case

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board appeared to struggle during a hearing Wednesday with arguments from both TCT Mobile and European patent-licensing company Sisvel in a fight over whether the latter's wireless communication system patent is invalid as obvious.

  • June 29, 2022

    Real Estate Rumors: Dependable Equities, Thor, Lennar

    Dependable Equities has reportedly paid $22.9 million for a Florida development site, Thor Equities is said to have bought 11 industrial properties in Georgia, and Lennar is reportedly seeking to build 46 townhomes in South Florida.

  • June 29, 2022

    Trenam Law Can't Rep PE Firm In Fight With Ex-CEO

    A Florida appeals court affirmed Wednesday that a Tampa law firm can't represent a private equity company in a suit and countersuit with its shareholder. 

  • June 29, 2022

    11th Circ. Says Nationwide Unit Not Liable For Late Claim

    The Eleventh Circuit refused to revive a Georgia retail building owner's suit against Scottsdale Insurance Co. on Wednesday, finding the company waited too long to file its claim after a September 2017 storm damaged its property.

  • June 29, 2022

    The State Of Abortion Legal Challenges Around The US

    Since the U.S. Supreme Court reversed Roe v. Wade last week with its landmark decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, restrictive state abortion bans have seen a wave of legal challenges. Here’s what’s happened in courthouses across the U.S. post-Dobbs.

  • June 29, 2022

    Winston & Strawn Adds To Miami Growth With 2 Partners

    Winston & Strawn LLP's Miami office is a little more than a month old, but it has already announced its second round of additional hires, with the latest group being made up of two new partners from Greenberg Traurig LLP as well as an of counsel and three new associates from Greenberg Traurig and Shutts & Bowen LLP.

  • June 28, 2022

    High Court's CSA Decree Augurs Opioid Upheaval For DOJ

    The U.S. Supreme Court's demand for a rock-solid showing of intentional impropriety when federal opioid prosecutors target pills-for-profits schemes under the Controlled Substances Act will send the U.S. Department of Justice scrambling to salvage its less sensational suits, attorneys say.

Expert Analysis

  • Hurricane Insurance Prep Is Key For Fla. Condos And HOAs

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    As this year's hurricane season gets underway, Florida associations for homeowners, condos and communities should review their insurance policies and protocols in advance of potential inclement weather, says Kelly Corcoran at Ball Janik.

  • Ethics Considerations For Attorneys Joining Nonprofit Boards

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Many charitable organizations offer attorneys board positions to benefit from their specialized legal knowledge, but there are ethical considerations and liability dangers that demand lawyers set boundaries about their roles and responsibilities, says Patrick Sturm at LexisNexis.

  • High Court's Opioid Ruling Shows Limits Of CSA's Reach

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Ruan v. U.S., demanding rock-solid proof of intentional impropriety to convict a prescriber under the Controlled Substances Act, provides reassurance to opioid prescribers, but the U.S. Department of Justice is unlikely to back down on CSA prosecutions, say Janelle Pelli and Michelle Peirce at Hinckley Allen.

  • High Court's Medicaid Ruling Brings Questions, Not Answers

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    Due to ambiguity in the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Gallardo v. Marstiller and an outright mistake in the parties' briefs incorporated into the dissent, it remains unclear whether Medicaid and Medicare can recover past and future medical expenses from settlements, judgments and awards, say David Farber and Arlene Hennessey at King & Spalding.

  • Recent Trade Secret Cases Show Sentencing Disparities

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    Sentencing disparities in U.S. trade secret cases have surfaced in recent years, and legal practitioners should know that courts have found that the intended loss does not necessarily equal the cost of development of stolen trade secrets or the defendant's intended gain from misappropriation, says Steven Lee at Lewis Brisbois.

  • Opinion

    Justices Should Resolve FCA Cases' Rule 9(b) Circuit Split

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    The U.S. Supreme Court should agree to hear three related False Claims Act cases and resolve the circuit split over the level of detail Rule 9(b) requires in qui tam complaints, or the viability of such actions will increasingly depend on where they are filed, say Kenneth Abell and Katherine Kulkarni at Abell Eskew.

  • Opinion

    Now's The Time To Address Archaic Law School Curricula

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    With law school enrollments jumping significantly ahead of a potential recession and more students graduating than the market can absorb, law schools should turn to creative solutions to teach students how to negotiate, work with clients, specialize and use technology to practice their craft more efficiently, says University of Colorado adjunct professor Jason Mendelson.

  • Employer Abortion Policy Considerations In A Post-Roe World

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    Restricted abortion access in many states after the U.S. Supreme Court’s expected reversal of Roe v. Wade may cause corporate recruitment and retention concerns, but before implementing policies that help employees access reproductive care, employers should consider their workforce’s values, legal risks and potential political backlash, says Meredith Kirshenbaum at Goldberg Kohn.

  • Lessons From Lawyer Fee-Sharing Agreements Gone Wrong

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    The recent fee-sharing dispute between Edelson and Girardi Keese is a reminder that lawyers who do not strictly follow the applicable rules may risk a disciplinary complaint, lose their share of the fee, or wind up in costly litigation with co-counsel, says David Grossbaum at Hinshaw.

  • LeClairRyan Bankruptcy Highlights Pass-Through Tax Issue

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    A Virginia bankruptcy court's recent ruling in the case of defunct law firm LeClairRyan shows there may be serious tax consequences for pass-through entity partners who give up their ownership interest without following operating agreement exit provisions and updating bankruptcy court filings, say Edward Schnitzer and Hannah Travaglini at Montgomery McCracken.

  • 1st Amendment May Help Cannabis Cos. Beat TM Claims

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    Frederic Rocafort at Harris Bricken explains how the First Amendment’s free speech protections may present a legal recourse for cannabis brands facing trademark infringement claims — if they can show that their parodic marks have artistic relevance and do not intentionally mislead consumers.

  • 8 Steps To Creating A Legal Ops Technology Road Map

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    Legal departments struggling to find and implement the right technologies for their operations should consider creating a road map that summarizes their approach to technology changes, provides clearly defined metrics for success, and serves as the single source of truth for stakeholders, says Melanie Shafer at SimpleLegal.

  • The Importance Of Data And Data Analysis In Litigation

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    Understanding, analyzing and effectively presenting large data sets is an increasingly important skill in litigation as it allows plaintiffs to dramatically scale up the scope of cases and is often critical to defeating motions to dismiss and motions for summary judgment, says David Burnett at Motley Rice.

  • Opinion

    Fla. Court's Mask Mandate Decision Is Confusing

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    A Florida federal court's decision in Health Freedom Defense Fund v. Biden, striking down the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's mask mandate for all forms of public transportation, contains some inconsistencies and questionable logic, says attorney Philip Howe.

  • Steps Companies Can Take To Mitigate Privilege Labeling Risk

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    Although Google prevailed on a recent privilege labeling sanctions motion, an important takeaway from the decision is that companies should assess their in-house procedures and employee training programs regarding privileged communications to mitigate risks of the potential appearance of bad faith privilege claims, say Gareth Evans at Redgrave and e-discovery attorney James Hertsch.

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