Government Contracts

  • May 31, 2024

    Co. Renews Dispute Over $1B CMS IT Deal At Claims Court

    An information technology services firm has protested the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' corrective action on a $1 billion IT deal, saying the agency didn't meaningfully reevaluate proposals, seeking only to shore up its previous awards.

  • May 31, 2024

    Texas Appeals Court Revives Suit Over Drilling Near Homes

    A Texas appeals court has partially revived a lawsuit brought by an environmental group against a city that approved a gas drilling zone near residential homes, finding Thursday that the trial court has jurisdiction over alleged violations of a state law regulating government meetings.

  • May 31, 2024

    Former Navy Vice Chief Indicted On Bribery Charges

    Retired U.S. Navy Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Robert Burke and the co-CEOs of a Navy contractor, Yongchul "Charlie" Kim and Meghan Messenger, have been indicted over an alleged bribery scheme to steer contracts to the executives' company, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Friday.

  • May 31, 2024

    Wash. Prison Law Not Biased Against GEO, 9th Circ. Told

    Washington state has urged the Ninth Circuit to lift a lower court's injunction blocking a law aimed at improving private prison standards, saying the law does not discriminatorily target private prison operator GEO Group Inc.

  • May 31, 2024

    Gov't Contracts Of The Month: Health, Spacecraft And Bombs

    The U.S. Defense Health Agency unveiled contracts worth tens of billions of dollars in May, including a scrutinized $43 billion medical staffing vehicle, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration added $6 billion to a spacecraft deal. Here, Law360 looks at some of the most noteworthy government contracts over the last month.

  • May 30, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Contract Breach Claim Against The US Mint

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday revived a coin processor's contention that the U.S. Mint breached a contract to pay for mutilated coins the agency redeemed, saying the U.S. Court of Federal Claims incorrectly concluded the processor failed to state a claim.

  • May 30, 2024

    Physician, Health Cos. Spar Over Docs In Fla. Qui Tam Suit

    A doctor and several healthcare businesses accused each other of withholding evidence in a Florida federal False Claims Act lawsuit, with the doctor saying several key Zoom meeting records were destroyed, although the businesses have alleged the doctor refused to provide a financial agreement she made with a cohort.

  • May 30, 2024

    Venezuelan Oil Co. Looks To Slip Asset Seizure Suit

    An Oklahoma-based oil drilling company insisted Thursday that the D.C. federal court has jurisdiction to decide claims that the company's Venezuelan subsidiary was illegally expropriated without compensation as Venezuela's state-owned oil company looks to slip the long-running suit.

  • May 30, 2024

    USDA Should Redo $44M Software Order Again, GAO Says

    The Government Accountability Office publicly released a decision on Thursday in support of a company's protest of a $44.2 million Department of Agriculture task order for software support for conservation-related programs, concluding the order was not properly issued.

  • May 30, 2024

    Judge Exits Military Families' Suit Over Fatal Osprey Crash

    A California federal judge recused himself from the wrongful death lawsuit launched by the families of the U.S. Marines killed when a Bell-Boeing-made V-22 Osprey went down, a recent court filing shows.

  • May 30, 2024

    ExamSoft, Bar Examiners Face $2M Software Crash Claims

    A 68-year-old former paralegal who hopes to become a pro bono attorney has sued the Connecticut Bar Examining Committee and ubiquitous bar exam test-taking software vendor ExamSoft Worldwide Inc. for $2 million, claiming three software crashes stymied her ability to take a exam offered remotely because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • May 30, 2024

    King & Spalding Adds Litigation Co-Lead From V&E

    King & Spalding LLP has hired Vinson & Elkins LLP's former commercial litigation group co-lead to join the firm in New York as a partner, the firm announced Thursday.

  • May 30, 2024

    DOL Says Challenged Provision In DBA Rule Is Lawful

    The U.S. Department of Labor pressed a Texas federal court not to halt its final rule regulating prevailing wages under the Davis-Bacon Act, saying that one of the provisions several construction groups are challenging is completely lawful.

  • May 29, 2024

    Honeywell Ends Suit Over $8.75M Bond For Army Base Work

    A Pennsylvania federal court has approved a request from Honeywell International Inc. to drop its lawsuit over an $8.75 million performance bond whose issuer allegedly balked at paying to replace a bankrupt subcontractor for a long-delayed job at the Tobyhanna Army Depot.

  • May 29, 2024

    FCC Chief Floats Plan To Cut Down On Orbital Satellite Debris

    The Federal Communications Commission's chair proposed new rules Wednesday aiming to reduce the chances of spacecraft explosions that leave debris in orbit.

  • May 29, 2024

    GAO Claims Jurisdiction And Denies Novel AI Protest

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office ruled it had the authority to hear a novel dispute over a company's exclusion from an Army prize competition for artificial intelligence technology because the competition could have eventually led to a contract, but ultimately rejected the protest.

  • May 29, 2024

    Texas Judge Bans Using $1.4B Border Wall Funds For Repairs

    A Texas federal judge on Wednesday permanently blocked the White House from using $1.4 billion of border wall construction funding for barrier repair, rejecting requests from landowners, contractors and environmental groups to reconsider the scope of the ban.

  • May 29, 2024

    Acting Boston US Atty Says Fraud Cases Still High Priority

    Prosecuting a range of fraud cases despite finite resources will remain a priority for Massachusetts acting U.S. Attorney Joshua Levy as he enters his second year in the job, he told reporters on Wednesday in a question and answer session at his office.

  • May 29, 2024

    Whistleblower Counsel Can't Get 'Exorbitant' $11.5M Fee

    A Boston federal judge slashed an "exorbitant" $11.5 million fee request made by counsel for a False Claims Act whistleblower in a case involving lab testing company Fresenius Medical Care, hammering the attorneys for inflated hourly rates, inflated time entries and a host of questionable billing practices.

  • May 28, 2024

    Orsted Inks $125M Deal With NJ Over Scrapped Wind Farms

    Orsted, a Danish wind energy company, has agreed to pay New Jersey $125 million to settle claims over the company's abrupt cancellation last fall of two offshore wind farms.

  • May 28, 2024

    White House Looks To Boost Carbon Credit Market Integrity

    The Biden administration on Tuesday released new guidelines for voluntary carbon markets, touting the measures as a foundation for "ambitious and credible climate action" that also attempts to address questions about the integrity of credits that companies use to show a greener footprint.

  • May 28, 2024

    States, Greens Want Judgment Over USPS' New Vehicle Plan

    Environmentalists and a coalition of 17 states called on a California federal judge to grant them judgment in litigation alleging the U.S. Postal Service violated the National Environmental Policy Act when it decided to replace its aging delivery fleet with "gas-guzzling vehicles."

  • May 28, 2024

    GSA Audit Authority Ruling Bars Crowley Suit Over DOD Deal

    A Court of Federal Claims judge has rejected Crowley Government Services Inc.'s protest over the terms of a U.S. Transportation Command solicitation for freight services, saying the company effectively attempted to relitigate an already decided dispute over the General Services Administration's audit authority.

  • May 28, 2024

    Conn. Judge Asks If 'Sham' Exception Saves Stadium Fight

    A Connecticut appellate judge asked Tuesday if a "sham" exception to limits on government contracting lawsuits can restore claims that the city of Hartford ran a fake bidding process for the redevelopment of Dillon Stadium, but counsel for several defendants pushed back and said it would not apply to the facts of the case.

  • May 28, 2024

    $3.1B Satellite Deal Needs Justices' Review, Co. Says

    A broker accusing Lockheed Martin and Airbus of cutting it from a $3.1 billion military satellite deal opposed the Biden administration's contention that a U.S. Supreme Court review isn't needed, saying the administration incorrectly focused on an underlying F-35 deal.

Expert Analysis

  • Lessons For Nursing Facilities From DOJ Fraud Settlement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent settlement with the owner of skilled nursing and assisted living facilities in Florida provides a cautionary tale of potential fraud risks, and lessons on how facilities can mitigate government enforcement actions, say Callan Stein and Rebecca Younker at Troutman Pepper.

  • 5 Takeaways From SAP's Foreign Bribery Resolutions

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    German software company SAP’s recent settlements with the U.S. Department of Justice and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, resolving allegations of foreign bribery, provide insights into government enforcement priorities, and how corporations should structure their compliance programs to reduce liability, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Nonprecedential, Unreasonable, Scope

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    James Tucker at MoFo examines three recent decisions showing that while the results of past competitions may inform bid strategy, they are not determinative; that an agency's award may be deemed unreasonable if it ignores available information; and that a protester may be right about an awardee's noncompliance but still lose.

  • Fears About The End Of Chevron Deference Are Overblown

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    While some are concerned about repercussions if the U.S. Supreme Court brings an end to Chevron deference in the Loper and Relentless cases this term, agencies and attorneys would survive just fine under the doctrines that have already begun to replace it, say Daniel Wolff and Henry Leung at Crowell & Moring.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Preparing For Possible Calif. Criminal Antitrust Enforcement

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    Though a recent announcement that the California Attorney General's Office will resume criminal prosecutions in support of its antitrust enforcement may be mere saber-rattling, companies and their counsel should nevertheless be prepared for interactions with the California AG's Antitrust Section that are not limited to civil liability issues, say Dylan Ballard and Lillian Sun at V&E.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Direct Claims Ruling May Alter Gov't Ties To Software Firms

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    A recent Federal Circuit decision allowing a software developer to pursue legal action under the Contract Disputes Act could change the government's relationship with commercial software providers by permitting direct claims, even in third-party purchase situations, say Dan Ramish and Zach Prince at Haynes Boone.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Facts Differ But Same Rules Apply

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    Zachary Jacobson and Sarah Barney at Seyfarth examine two decisions illustrating that reliance on a technicality may not save an otherwise untimely appeal, and that enforcement of commercial terms and conditions under a federal supply schedule contract may be possible.

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • 10 Areas To Watch In Aerospace And Defense Contracting Law

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    The near future holds a number of key areas to watch in aerospace and defense contracting law, ranging from dramatic developments in the space industry to recent National Defense Authorization Act updates, which are focused on U.S. leadership in emerging technologies, say Joseph Berger and Chip Purcell at Thompson Hine.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Opinion

    NIST March-In Framework Is As Problematic As 2021 Proposal

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    While the National Institute of Standards and Technology's proposed march-in framework on when the government can seize patents has been regarded as a radical departure that will support lowering prescription drug costs, the language at the heart of it is identical to a failed 2021 notice of proposed rulemaking, says attorney Kelly Morron.

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