Government Contracts

  • June 24, 2021

    GAO Won't Rethink Ending VA Lease Award Protest

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office refused to rethink its dismissal of a protest to a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs lease award, saying the department's decision to reevaluate the proposals rendered the protest academic.

  • June 24, 2021

    GAO Says Iron Mountain Owed Costs After Slow VA Deal Fix

    The Government Accountability Office has ruled Iron Mountain should be reimbursed part of its costs for protesting a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs task order for records management services, saying the VA wrongly dragged its feet before taking corrective action.

  • June 24, 2021

    Biden, GOP Senators Strike $1.2T Infrastructure Deal

    In a major step toward advancing his economic agenda, President Joe Biden reached a deal Thursday with a bipartisan group of U.S. senators on an estimated $1.2 trillion infrastructure plan, but it likely hinges on passage of a separate reconciliation bill addressing the president's other legislative priorities.

  • June 24, 2021

    Polaris Can't Duck Claims Seat Paralyzed West Point Cadet

    A Tennessee federal judge has found that Polaris Industries Inc. can't escape trial in a suit by a West Point cadet who alleges a faulty ATV seat made by the company caused him to be paralyzed in an accident, saying there are a number of factual disputes for a jury to hear.

  • June 24, 2021

    Senate Confirms Carnahan As GSA Administrator

    The U.S. Senate has confirmed former Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan to lead the U.S. General Services Administration, where she has promised to improve digital infrastructure across the government.

  • June 24, 2021

    NJ Senate Votes To End Immigration Detention

    New Jersey is on track to join California and become the first East Coast state to ban U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention facilities following a vote Thursday.

  • June 24, 2021

    Greenberg Traurig Adds Trials Co-Chief From Mayer Brown

    Greenberg Traurig PA has brought on former federal prosecutor William Michael Jr. to co-chair the firm's trial practice in Miami and Minneapolis, swiping the white collar defense pro from his most recent leadership role at Mayer Brown LLP.

  • June 23, 2021

    Tech Group Urges Biden Admin To Reform Gov't Contracts

    The Alliance for Digital Innovation, a technology group that seeks to shape government innovation, suggested Tuesday that the Biden administration reform the structure of governmentwide acquisition contracts to increase the government's access to information technology.

  • June 23, 2021

    Court Rules Committee Moves To Stiffen Expert Standard

    A U.S. courts committee is backing a proposed rule change that would tighten up standards for expert witnesses to get in front of juries, after major businesses complained that unscientific evidence was making its way into courtrooms.

  • June 23, 2021

    Steinmetz May Drop $10B Guinea Mining Suit Against Soros

    A joint New York federal court letter from Israeli billionaire Beny Steinmetz and billionaire investor George Soros revealed Steinmetz might drop his $10 billion suit against Soros for allegedly sabotaging his Guinean iron mining contract.

  • June 23, 2021

    Abu Ghraib Contractor Presses Justices To Review Its Case

    A U.S. Department of Defense contractor facing accusations that its employees supported prisoner abuse at an Iraqi prison has renewed its call for the U.S. Supreme Court to review whether it can appeal for derivative sovereign immunity.

  • June 23, 2021

    Chicago's $1.16B Parking Deal Faces Antitrust Lawsuit

    Three Chicagoans are suing an investment entity led by Morgan Stanley & Co. over a controversial $1.16 billion deal it reached with the city to get control of Chicago's pay-to-park system, alleging that an amended 75-year-long contract signed in 2013 unlawfully gave the company monopoly power over the parking meter system.

  • June 23, 2021

    Bill Would Make Ligado Pay For GPS Interference Costs

    A bipartisan Senate bill could require Ligado Networks to pick up the tab for any disruptions the private sector experiences if it forges ahead with repurposing the L-band satellite airwaves for mobile transmissions.

  • June 23, 2021

    Staffing Firm CEO Admits Media Agency Bribe Scheme

    A North Carolina woman whose company provided staff for the U.S. Agency for Global Media has pled guilty to taking part in a bribery scheme with the one-time contracting officer for the agency, which runs the Voice of America radio service.

  • June 23, 2021

    Ex-AstraZeneca Rep Wins $2.4M Verdict On Retaliation Claim

    An Oregon federal jury has awarded a former AstraZeneca sales manager $2.4 million in back pay and damages, agreeing that she was fired for reporting what she believed was illegal off-label drug promotion but rejecting her age discrimination claim.

  • June 22, 2021

    In Arthrex, Justices Deal New Blow To Agency Independence

    The U.S. Supreme Court's Monday decision in U.S. v. Arthrex Inc. stripping administrative patent judges of final decision-making authority is a bombshell for the intellectual property world, but experts say it also blunts Congress' efforts to keep politics out of agency adjudications.

  • June 22, 2021

    Claims Court Explains Why VA Can't Revisit Contract Transfer

    A Court of Federal Claims judge has explained his refusal to remand cases over the planned interagency transfer of billions of dollars of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical supply contracts, saying the dispute needed to be resolved in court.

  • June 22, 2021

    IHS Urges DC Circ. Not To Revisit Tribal Health Costs Ruling

    The Indian Health Service has urged the D.C. Circuit not to rethink its decision to reject the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community's bid to recoup certain contract support costs under its health care contract with the agency, saying a panel rightly found the IHS doesn't have to cover those costs for income that comes from insurers.

  • June 22, 2021

    GOP Halts Voting Bill That Takes On Court Ethics, Donor Rules

    Republicans on Tuesday blocked the Senate from considering major Democratic legislation on voting and campaign finance, stalling a package that contains a U.S. Supreme Court ethics code, lobbying changes and funding disclosure for political ads, including those related to judicial nominations.

  • June 22, 2021

    FERC Hit With $234M Complaint Over Edenville Dam Bust

    Michigan residents whose homes were destroyed by a catastrophic dam failure last year want to hold the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission responsible for more than $234 million in damages, saying the agency knew full well the dam was dangerous for nearly three decades but did nothing.

  • June 22, 2021

    Ex-NFL Player's Sentence For $40M Tricare Fraud Reduced

    Former NFL player Monty Grow was sentenced in Florida federal court on Tuesday to just under 13 years in prison for his role in a $40 million health care fraud scheme, after the Eleventh Circuit ruled that part of the original nearly 22-year sentence exceeded what the jury's verdict allowed.

  • June 22, 2021

    Real Estate Rumors: Lennar, CTL Capital, Westdale

    Lennar has reportedly sold part of a Florida development site for $24.71 million, CTL Capital is said to have loaned $82.5 million for a New Jersey property where the FBI has a field office, and Westdale Real Estate Investment & Management is said to have purchased a Florida apartment complex for $82.92 million.  

  • June 22, 2021

    Fed. Circ. Will Return To In-Person Arguments In August

    After almost 15 months of holding arguments remotely, the Federal Circuit plans to open its doors to lawyers again in late August, but will test out new in-person COVID-19 protocols in two cases next month, including Kite Pharma Inc.'s high-profile appeal of a $1.2 billion patent infringement judgment against it.

  • June 21, 2021

    Challengers Say $23B UAE Arms Sale Dispute Should Proceed

    Challengers to the U.S. Department of State's approval of $23.4 billion in proposed arms sales to the United Arab Emirates have pushed back against the department's bid to toss the dispute, saying they have legal standing to pursue the case.

  • June 21, 2021

    NJ Assembly Passes Immigration Detention Ban

    The New Jersey General Assembly passed a bill on Monday that would ban U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement from detaining immigrants in the Garden State.

Expert Analysis

  • Voluntary CFIUS Filings May Limit Uncertain Outcomes

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    Attorneys at DLA Piper outline key considerations U.S. businesses should consider when deciding whether to voluntarily notify the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States of transactions, in order to avoid unexpected governmental review and intervention.

  • Where FCA Litigation Stands 5 Years After Escobar

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    Five years after the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark decision in Escobar, the False Claims Act's materiality requirement continues to be at the center of complex investigations and litigation, and the ruling has significantly affected dispositive motions, discovery and the U.S. Department of Justice’s dismissal authority, say Matthew Curley and Brian Roark at Bass Berry.

  • Biden Sanctions Reinforce Trump-Era Foreign Policy

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    Five months in, the Biden administration has continued and expanded Trump-era sanctions policies, which is particularly relevant against the backdrop of the evolving relationship between the U.S. and China, and creates a framework for robust enforcement from the Office of Foreign Assets Control in the years ahead, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Local Gov'ts Must Note Lessons In Religious Exception Ruling

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    Last week’s U.S. Supreme Court decision in Fulton v. Philadelphia marks a noteworthy change in the free exercise doctrine and has important implications for state and local governments in balancing tensions between anti-discrimination and religious accommodation policies, say Eric Fraser and Josh Bendor at Osborn Maledon.

  • Navigating Inadvertent Attorney-Client Privilege Waivers

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    Spencer Fane’s Deena Duffy offers tips for identifying accidental privilege waivers based on local and federal rules, and for interpreting recent case law when such rules are unclear.

  • 5 Mistakes Gov't Contractors Make When Shipping Cargo

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    As the White House is creating a new office that will ensure agency compliance with cargo preference requirements, now is a good time to review certain misconceptions about shipping cargo under government contracts — such as assuming a Federal Acquisition Regulation clause doesn't apply to a company because it is shipping commercial items, says Jayna Rust at Thompson Coburn.

  • Attorneys Beware: Zoom Depositions Are Likely Inadmissible

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    As legal proceedings have moved online in light of the pandemic, lawyers may mistakenly believe that recorded Zoom video depositions can be entered as evidence, but without certain safeguards, the testimony is unlikely to be accepted by courts, says Phillip Zisook at Schoenberg Finkel.

  • 5 Ways To Make The Most Of GSA's New Gov't Contracts Site

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    The General Services Administration's new systems award management website has gotten mixed reviews, but key insights for navigating the aggregated federal acquisition databases can help users build more successful and compliant government contracting businesses, say Matthew Haws and Umer Chaudhry at Jenner & Block.

  • Law Firm Talent Must Reflect Shifting US Demographics

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    Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks and Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan analyze and project U.S. demographic trends to show that law firms that hope to succeed long-term must recruit, retain and advance female lawyers and lawyers of color, and they outline six steps for meeting these goals.

  • Thorny Issues Posed By WTO Vaccine Patent Waiver

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    The U.S. government's talks with World Trade Organization member states on waiving certain intellectual property rights for COVID-19 vaccines present complex questions with regard to pharmaceutical industry barriers to entry, existing mechanisms for transfer of vaccine technology and long-standing international treaty obligations, says Catriona Collins at LexisNexis.

  • Medical Device Cases Show Increased Sunshine Act Scrutiny

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    Recent U.S. Department of Justice and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services settlements with two medical device manufacturers signal ramped-up enforcement of the Sunshine Act, highlighting a departure from a historically gentler approach, say Jaime Jones and Brenna Jenny at Sidley.

  • A Gov't Contractor's Road Map To Biden Cybersecurity Order

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    Following President Joe Biden's recent executive order to improve U.S. cybersecurity, Justin Chiarodo and Sharon Klein at Blank Rome highlight how four key elements will particularly affect government contractors and their suppliers, and what contractors should expect as they prepare to operate in a new compliance environment.

  • A Biz Strategy Model To Improve Lateral Atty Hiring Diversity

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    Quantitative comparison tools commonly used by companies in evaluating merger targets will allow law firms to assess lateral hire candidates in a demographically neutral manner, help remove bias from the hiring process and bring real diversity to the legal profession, says Thomas Latino at Florida State University.

  • Smaller Firms Need Employee Wellness Programs, Too

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    As we emerge from the pandemic, small and midsize firms — which offer an ideal setting for companywide connection — should follow in the footsteps of larger organizations and heed the American Bar Association’s recommendations by adopting well-being initiatives and appointing a chief wellness officer, says Janine Pollack at Calcaterra Pollack.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Clarity, Timeliness, Agency Deference

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Caitlin Crujido at MoFo looks at decisions from the U.S. Government Accountability Office and U.S. Court of Federal Claims highlighting the importance of clear proposals and timeliness in solicitation ambiguity protests, and showing that the GAO and Claims Court will generally defer to an agency's judgment about an organizational conflict.

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