Government Contracts

  • January 22, 2020

    Securities Law Firms Vie For Lead In Energy Transfer Suit

    Four prominent firms well-versed in securities law submitted bids Tuesday to lead or help lead a proposed shareholders’ class action against pipeline company Energy Transfer LP.

  • January 22, 2020

    Oracle Says Microsoft Winning JEDI Doesn't Moot Protest

    Oracle argued to keep alive its lawsuit alleging that the Pentagon's search for a company for its $10 billion cloud computing contract unfairly favored Amazon, saying Microsoft ultimately winning the deal doesn't render its challenge moot.

  • January 22, 2020

    MasTec Says Bribes Cost It $500M In Puerto Rico Work

    Florida-based engineering firm MasTec sued Mammoth Energy Services unit Cobra Acquisitions Tuesday, claiming a bribery scheme diverted $500 million worth of repair work for fixing Puerto Rico's hurricane-damaged electrical grid from MasTec to Cobra.

  • January 22, 2020

    Energy Cos. Tell 1st Circ. Climate Case Belongs In Fed. Court

    Energy giants including Chevron and Shell have again urged the First Circuit to find federal courts have jurisdiction over Rhode Island's suit seeking to force the companies to pay for climate change-related costs, arguing the dispute doesn't belong in state court.

  • January 22, 2020

    Dems Say DOD Funds Are For Nat'l Security, Not Border Wall

    House Democrats urged the Trump administration to rethink using $7.2 billion in military funding to build a wall, saying that a national security plan for potential global conflicts should be prioritized over a nonexistent threat at the U.S.-Mexico border.

  • January 21, 2020

    CACI Wins $13.3M Anti-Drone Deal

    CACI International Inc. has been tapped for a $13.3 million U.S. Navy contract to provide engineering, program management and technical services for anti-drone systems, the U.S. Department of Defense has announced.

  • January 21, 2020

    Ill. Chief Judge Claims Immunity Over 'Empire' Use Of Facility

    The chief judge for Cook County, Illinois, has asked to be let out of a suit alleging the county and Twentieth Century Fox unfairly profited from using a juvenile detention center to film parts of the show "Empire," arguing federal law immunizes him from the suit.

  • January 21, 2020

    Latino Group Challenges Las Vegas' ICE Cooperation

    A Latino civil rights organization is challenging the constitutionality of Las Vegas’ policy of detaining immigrants in city jails after they have completed their sentences in order to turn them over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, a practice the group says amounts to holding individuals without probable cause.

  • January 21, 2020

    Tech Biz Says Too Late To DQ Firm In $100M Army Bid Fight

    A technology company fired back at a former business partner's bid to disqualify Miles & Stockbridge PC in a dispute over a $100 million U.S. Army contract, slamming the move as "untimely."

  • January 21, 2020

    Medical Device Co. Accused Of Upending $2B VA Contract

    A U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs contractor accused a medical device manufacturer of illegally disrupting its $2.1 billion medical supply contract, calling its conduct “unconscionable.”

  • January 17, 2020

    EU Mulls Temporary Ban On Face ID Tech In Public Places

    The European Commission is weighing a temporary ban on both public entities' and private companies' using facial recognition technology in public places, amid privacy concerns about the mass monitoring of EU citizens, a report made public Friday shows.

  • January 17, 2020

    Hoffmann-La Roche Says Tamiflu FCA Suit 'Ignores Reality'

    The Swiss pharmaceutical giant Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. has urged a Maryland federal judge to throw out a whistleblower’s False Claims Act suit alleging that it fraudulently induced the government to spend $1.4 billion on stockpiling Tamiflu to thwart an influenza outbreak, saying the suit "completely ignores reality.”

  • January 17, 2020

    GAO Denies Raytheon Protest Over $288M Ship Defense Deal

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office has denied Raytheon’s protest over a $287.6 million U.S. Navy contract for a ship self-defense system awarded to rival Lockheed Martin, saying the Navy had properly vetted both companies' bids.

  • January 17, 2020

    Ex-Pa. Mayor Can't Upend 8-Year Sentence For Bribery

    The Third Circuit denied a bid by the former mayor of Reading, Pennsylvania, to slash an eight-year federal prison sentence stemming from his 2018 conviction on charges that he took campaign contributions from contractors in exchange for promises of work with the city.

  • January 17, 2020

    Bradley Arant Nabs Former Assistant US Atty In NC

    A former assistant U.S. attorney has joined Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP as a partner in the firm's government enforcement and investigations practice group.

  • January 17, 2020

    House Bill Would Nix Reverse Auctions For Construction Work

    Federal agencies could no longer use reverse auctions during bidding for federal construction contracts under a bipartisan bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • January 16, 2020

    Former Navy Officer Censured Over 'Fat Leonard' Bribes

    The U.S. Navy has censured a former senior noncommissioned officer for taking gifts from a contractor to look the other way on overpriced invoices, it announced on Thursday, adding to the dozens of current and former Navy officers embroiled in the "Fat Leonard" bribery scandal. 

  • January 16, 2020

    FBI Will Now Alert State Officials If Election System Breached

    The FBI said Thursday that, in a change of policy, it will now notify state election officials when malicious actors are believed to have breached local election systems, in an effort to improve communication about security threats as the 2020 election season approaches.

  • January 16, 2020

    Army Nixes Major Vehicle Deal After Poor Industry Response

    The U.S. Army has canceled a solicitation for its next-generation combat vehicle, saying Thursday that the industry response to the multibillion-dollar program had prompted it to go back to the drawing board on its requirements and acquisition strategy.

  • January 16, 2020

    Mexico Must Share Quinn Emanuel Probe Info In $700M Case

    Mexico must disclose whether it's investigating alleged improprieties committed by Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP stemming from its representation of U.S. investors seeking at least $700 million from the country in arbitration over terminated oil rig lease agreements, an international tribunal has ruled.

  • January 16, 2020

    Feds Beef Up Claims Against Kansas Prof Over China Program

    Prosecutors on Thursday unveiled a new, more detailed indictment against a University of Kansas researcher accused of hiding his ties to a Chinese university.

  • January 16, 2020

    Feds Fight To Keep $122M Suit Against Texas Hospital

    The federal government has urged a judge in Texas to keep alive its $122 million fraud lawsuit alleging an Austin-area hospital and a group of executives lied to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in order to get a loan to build the hospital, arguing the allegations are not vague “shotgun pleadings.”

  • January 16, 2020

    US Says Cos. Have 90 Days To Comply With Iran Sanctions

    The U.S. Treasury Department said Thursday that it would give companies 90 days to wind down their business operations in Iran’s metals, mining and construction sectors before they faced punishment under new sanctions issued last week.

  • January 16, 2020

    Ex-Air Force Staffer, Contractor Indicted Over Bribery Scheme

    Defense training contractor QuantaDyn and a former U.S. Air Force employee have been indicted in Texas federal court over an alleged bribery scheme to steer more than $100 million in federal contracts to the company, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • January 15, 2020

    ResMed Settles FCA Suits Over Referral Fraud For $39.5M

    A California-based medical equipment manufacturer will pay $39.5 million to resolve five False Claims Act lawsuits claiming it paid suppliers, sleep labs and health providers illegal kickbacks to sell more of its products for sleep disorders, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Nissan Ex-CEO Illustrates Do's And Don'ts Of Image Repair

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    Lawyers can draw a number of useful lessons about reputation management from the efforts of former Nissan executive Carlos Ghosn — who recently escaped house arrest in Tokyo — to restore his sullied reputation, says Elizabeth Ortega at ECO Strategic Communications.

  • 3 Concerns If Your Witness Becomes Flippant At Deposition

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    In light of a recent Delaware Supreme Court case in which a litigator was rebuked for failing to control his evasive witness during a deposition, attorneys should consider when they may be held responsible for client misconduct and what to do if a client crosses the line, says Philip Sechler of Robbins Russell.

  • Reining In Runaway Loss Calculations For Procurement Fraud

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    In criminal prosecutions of procurement fraud cases involving set-aside contracts, prosecutors frequently argue that the victim’s loss is the total face value of the wrongfully awarded contracts, but this reasoning cannot survive basic scrutiny, say David Chaiken and Tiffany Bracewell at Troutman Sanders.

  • Takeaways From Exxon’s Winning OFAC Penalty Challenge

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    A recent Texas federal court decision overturning a $2 million Office of Foreign Assets Control fine against Exxon provides insight into OFAC's enforcement of complex sanctions and when its practices may not provide proper notice to companies subject to U.S. sanctions, say Aaron Hutman and Zachary Rozen at Pillsbury.

  • How OFCCP's Systemic Discrimination Audit Proposal Is Flawed

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    The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs' recently proposed new rule, laying out statistical thresholds for finding systemic discrimination, would implement a problematic method of statistical analysis and notice provisions that may provide government contractors inadequate time to respond, say Chris Wilkinson and Necia Hobbes at Orrick.

  • Stark Law Uncertainty Follows 3rd Circ.'s UPMC Opinion

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    The Third Circuit recently amended its September decision in U.S. v. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, removing a controversial interpretation of the volume-or-value standard under the Stark Law. However, the court's approach is not in line with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' analysis regarding indirect compensation arrangements, says Karl Thallner of Reed Smith.

  • Key Trends In Energy Antitrust Enforcement And Litigation

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    Antitrust agencies and private litigants continued to focus on the energy industry in 2019, and new antitrust policy initiatives announced by the U.S. Department of Justice last year will offer energy companies opportunities to avoid prosecution in certain cases, say attorneys at Vinson & Elkins.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: 2019's Most Noteworthy Decisions

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    In this month's bid protest roundup, Victoria Angle at MoFo highlights two December decisions from the U.S. Government Accountability Office, looks back at five of the most interesting bid protests of 2019 and provides a few takeaways from the GAO's fiscal year 2019 report.

  • FIRREA Remains Potent Civil Fraud Enforcement Tool

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    Last year, three court decisions addressing the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act's civil monetary penalties provision — two at the final judgment stage and one at the pleadings stage — expanded FIRREA jurisprudence and remind us why this statute cannot be ignored, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • Gov't Contractor Suspension And Debarment: 2019 In Review

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    Attorneys at Covington look back at last year's policy trends and developments, legislative and rulemaking activity, and notable federal district court rulings related to the exclusion of contractors from doing business with the federal government.

  • OFAC's New Iran Sanctions May Not Signal Seismic Change

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    While President Donald Trump’s recent executive order expands the ability of the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control to sanction non-U.S. entities doing business with Iran, it remains to be seen whether OFAC will pursue aggressive enforcement of its strengthened secondary sanctions authority, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • 2019 Trends In DOJ Civil Health Care Fraud Cases

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    Last year, the U.S. Department of Justice maintained aggressive enforcement efforts in the health care industry, again relying heavily on the False Claims Act, but the agency is also taking steps to guide those efforts toward fairness and consistency, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

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    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • 2019 Trends In DOJ Health Care Enforcement

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    Last year, opioid-related enforcement was the U.S. Department of Justice's top priority, in addition to a sustained focus on the prosecution of private individuals and data-driven identification of health care fraud, say attorneys at Mintz.