Illinois

  • October 11, 2019

    Collision Victim Doesn’t Need Expert In Brain Injury Case

    A man who claims he suffered a traumatic brain injury after a truck collision doesn’t need expert testimony to show the accident caused his injury, an Illinois federal judge said on Friday, noting that other evidence can establish whether he had a brain injury before the collision.

  • October 11, 2019

    Chicago Man Ran Illegal Sports Gambling Business, Feds Say

    A Chicago resident ran an illegal gambling business and hid that work and related income in a bankruptcy proceeding he initiated to escape a $1.5 million civil judgment, according to charges federal prosecutors made public Friday.

  • October 11, 2019

    Chicago's Ex-Chief Judge Turns To 'Unfinished Business'

    After 25 years on the federal bench in Chicago, former Chief U.S. District Judge Rubén Castillo is returning to private practice as a man with a mission, ready to tackle "unfinished business."

  • October 11, 2019

    Grubhub Says Calls To Customer Were Properly Targeted

    A Grubhub user has “pled herself out of court” after amending claims that customers nationwide received hundreds of unwanted autodialed calls despite being told they would stop, the mobile food delivery service has argued in a bid to escape the suit.

  • October 11, 2019

    US Foods, Disney Object To $135M Deal In Truck Engine Row

    Disney and U.S. Foods are among truck fleet owners objecting to a $135 million settlement between Navistar Inc. and a proposed class of truck buyers, saying the deal is inadequate and unfair because it fails to compensate them for the diminished market value of trucks with defective diesel engines.

  • October 11, 2019

    Minerals Co. Can't Escape Suit Over $70M Award Enforcement

    International minerals supplier Amcol International Corp. can't escape litigation in which it's accused of orchestrating fraudulent transfers to shield assets that were being targeted by a Singapore shipper to enforce more than $70 million in arbitral awards.

  • October 11, 2019

    Biotech, Bank Raise Combined $276M In Low-Priced IPOs

    Drug developer Vir Biotechnology Inc. and Chicago-area bank HBT Financial Inc. made their debuts in public markets Friday after raising nearly $276 million combined in initial public offerings that priced at the bottom of their ranges, capping off a mild week for IPOs.

  • October 11, 2019

    Caterpillar Can't Ditch Antitrust Claims Even As Suit Slashed

    Caterpillar Inc. and Komatsu America Corp. have failed to escape antitrust claims accusing them of trying to strong-arm a competitor out of the construction equipment business, despite a Delaware federal judge slicing the long-running suit to the bare bones.

  • October 11, 2019

    'Repugnant' Public Charge Rule Blocked By 3 Judges

    Three federal judges in New York, California and Washington state blocked the Trump administration Friday from enforcing a rule that would penalize immigrants for using public assistance programs, with one judge calling the measure "repugnant."

  • October 11, 2019

    Congress Looks To Expand Financial Whistleblower Definition

    Congress seems poised to broaden the relatively narrow definition of whistleblower as it pertains to reporting violations of securities laws that was laid out by the U.S. Supreme Court last year, a development attorneys say would benefit potential whistleblowers and their employers alike.

  • October 11, 2019

    Fired Workers Want Bayou Steel Ch. 11 Sent To Louisiana

    A group of employees terminated by steel mill operator Bayou Steel BD Holdings LLC shortly before it filed for Chapter 11 protection have asked a Delaware judge to transfer the bankruptcy cases to Louisiana, arguing the company has no real connections to the First State.

  • October 10, 2019

    Real Estate Rumors: JVM, Global Holdings, Lennar

    JVM Realty has reportedly bought an Illinois apartment complex from Opus Group, Global Holdings Management Group is said to be paying nearly $400 million for a New York apartment tower, and homebuilder Lennar has reportedly paid a PIMCO-managed entity $6.1 million for 50 Florida lots.

  • October 10, 2019

    Domino's Pizza Franchisee Reaches Deal In Driver Wage Suit

    An Illinois Domino's Pizza franchisee has agreed to pay roughly $800,000 to settle a collective action accusing it of underpaying pizza delivery drivers in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • October 10, 2019

    Student Loan Servicer Accused Of Mishandling Overpayments

    A Wisconsin-based student loan servicer misrepresents the way it allocates excess payments from borrowers on income-based repayment plans, an Illinois borrower claimed Thursday.

  • October 10, 2019

    Illinois Wendy's Franchisee Hit With Biometric Privacy Suit

    A former crew member at an Illinois Wendy's has filed a proposed class action claiming that her employer, franchisee All-Star Inc., breached the state's unique biometric privacy law by scanning employees' thumbprints for time-keeping purposes without first getting consent.

  • October 10, 2019

    Atty Outed By Co-Counsel Asks Court To Revive $26M Suit

    An attorney who says he was fired from defending an accused 9/11 terrorist after his co-counsel outed him as gay told an Illinois federal court that the state’s absolute litigation privilege doesn't cover the spreading of inflammatory statements.

  • October 10, 2019

    DOJ, Realtors At Odds Over Earlier Deal In Antitrust Case

    An Illinois federal judge overseeing a case alleging the National Association of Realtors violated antitrust laws ruled Thursday that the U.S. Department of Justice can respond to what it says is the NAR's "incorrect portrayal" of a 2008 consent decree between the government and the association.

  • October 10, 2019

    Suit Claiming NFL Cheated Illinois Clinic Moved To Texas

    An Illinois federal judge on Thursday sent to the Northern District of Texas a suit by an Illinois clinic claiming the National Football League told Cigna not to pay out on the league's health plan, arguing it should be consolidated with a similar case the clinic already has in that district.

  • October 10, 2019

    Sears Hometown Investors Say Lampert Engineered Bad Deal

    Sears Hometown and Outlet Stores investors have filed a proposed class action in Delaware Chancery Court accusing controlling shareholder and former Sears CEO Edward S. Lampert of a yearslong effort to strip value from the retailer to buy out its remaining shares at an unfairly low price.

  • October 10, 2019

    Kraft Dodges Suit Over 'No Preservatives' Capri Sun Label

    An Illinois federal judge on Thursday tossed a proposed class action claiming Kraft Heinz Food Co. falsely advertised its Capri Sun drinks as preservative-free, saying the complaint failed to show that Kraft uses an artificial form of citric acid.

  • October 09, 2019

    Ex-Worker Gets 1 Year For Iron Bar Trade Secret Theft

    An Illinois federal judge sentenced an ex-employee at an iron bar manufacturer to a year and a day in prison Wednesday for stealing the company’s trade secrets before leaving to work for a Chinese competitor.

  • October 09, 2019

    Groupon Photo Suit Shipped Back To District Court

    An Instagram user's putative class action against Groupon is headed back to Illinois federal court after the Seventh Circuit on Wednesday ordered a limited remand, finding Groupon hadn't proved federal jurisdiction when it asked for the case to be removed from state court.

  • October 09, 2019

    McDermott Taps Ex-Skadden Atty As Bankruptcy Co-Chair

    McDermott Will & Emery LLP has hired a pair of attorneys to bolster its bankruptcy practice, naming former Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP partner Felicia Perlman as co-chair of its restructuring and insolvency group and adding Brad Giordano from King & Spalding LLP.

  • October 09, 2019

    Worker, Mom 'Brazenly' Poaching Gaming Co.'s Customers

    Illinois' largest video gaming company has accused a marketing employee and his mother of funneling the business' customers to their own venture.

  • October 09, 2019

    Judge Consolidates Wage-Fixing Suits Against Chicken Cos.

    A Maryland federal judge on Wednesday granted a bid by ex-chicken producer employees to consolidate related cases in a proposed class action accusing chicken processing companies of a decadelong conspiracy to fix the wages of hundreds of thousands of workers.

Expert Analysis

  • How Emotionally Intelligent AI Could Assist With E-Discovery

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    While artificial intelligence has already revolutionized the e-discovery field, the development of emotionally intelligent AI promises to explore data in an even more nuanced and human way, thereby further reducing the burden on legal teams, say Lisa Prowse and Brian Schrader at e-discovery services provider BIA.

  • Despite Legalization, Marijuana Usage Is Risky For Ill. Tenants

    Excerpt from Lexis Practice Advisor
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    For many Illinois residents, the passage of the Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act was cause for celebration. However, the fact that marijuana remains illegal at the federal level, combined with the Illinois Eviction Act, means that marijuana use can still lead to eviction, says Richard Toboz of Heavner Beyers.

  • State Net

    States May Slow Spread Of Vehicle Subscription Services

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    Motor vehicle subscription services — similar to auto leases, except with no long-term commitment, the ability to change vehicles periodically, and insurance and maintenance bundled in — have been embraced by some automakers, insurers and consumers, but face potential roadblocks from state lawmakers and regulators, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Preventable Risks Your Law Firm May Be Overlooking

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    Although most lawyers are well-prepared to defend or justify the value of an insurance claim for clients, often law firms have not clearly identified their own potential liabilities, planned for adequate insurance or established prudent internal risk management practices, says Victor Sordillo at Sompo International.

  • 6 Ethics Tips For Attorneys Making Lateral Transfers

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    With lateral transfers between law firms on the rise, it is more important than ever for partners to understand the steps they must take to adhere to ethics rules and other requirements when making a transition, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Competing Refusal-To-Deal Tests At 7th, 9th Circs.

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    The Viamedia and Qualcomm antitrust cases in the Seventh and Ninth Circuits, in which the U.S. Department of Justice has taken positions regarding when a refusal to deal could be unlawful, may lead the U.S. Supreme Court to clarify the appropriate standard for refusal to deal claims, says Ryan Sandrock of Sidley.

  • Opinion

    Erosion Of Bristol-Myers Test In Class Actions Is Misguided

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    In two pending class actions, the Seventh Circuit and the D.C. Circuit may be slated to water down the U.S. Supreme Court's Bristol-Myers holding that state courts do not have specific, personal jurisdiction over nonresident plaintiffs' claims, even though there is no policy justification for treating class actions differently, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Email Notice Lessons From 7th Circ. Debt Collection Ruling

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    The Seventh Circuit's decision in Lavallee v. Med-1 doesn't mean that debt validation notices can’t be sent through email, and it’s unlikely to affect the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s proposed debt collection rule, but it does make clear that collectors must be careful when using electronic communications, say John Redding and Marshall Bell at Buckley.

  • Direct Taxes: The Next Shoe To Drop After Wayfair?

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    Taxpayers should be alarmed at state efforts to extend the U.S. Supreme Court's Wayfair decision to direct taxes — including gross receipts, income and franchise taxes — despite the apparent protections of federal Public Law 86-272, says Martin Eisenstein of Brann & Isaacson.

  • State Net

    Battles Still Rage Over Calif. Data, Worker Classification Laws

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    California is set to be reshaped soon by two pieces of legislation — one on data privacy, and one on worker classification — but numerous attempts by lawmakers to amend both laws, and the possibility of ballot measures that may further alter them, are clouding the picture, says Rich Ehisen of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Consider The Power Of Tactical Empathy

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    By employing tactical empathy techniques to understand the interests behind the positions taken by others, attorneys can gain the upper hand in deal negotiations and litigation while still promoting and preserving long-term relationships with opponents, judges and others, say Shermin Kruse of TEDxYouth@Wrigleyville and Ursula Taylor of Strategic Health.

  • The Problem — And Opportunity — Of Implicit Bias In The Bar

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    Law firms are beginning to recognize implicit bias as a problem. But too few recognize that it is also an opportunity to broaden our thinking and become better legal problem solvers, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • #MeToo Shows 2 Years Of Progress Toward Gender Parity

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    #MeToo turns 2 this fall, and while troubling reports of bad workplace behavior have emerged since the movement began, legislation and grassroots community collaborations that focus on preventive measures, such as training and external certifications, are fruitful areas for future development, says Jen Rubin at Mintz.

  • Wisconsin Trailing In Midwest's Race To Legalize Cannabis

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    If it continues to watch from the sidelines as its neighboring states — especially Illinois — legalize marijuana, Wisconsin risks losing out on economic opportunities and tax revenue, says Paloma Kennedy of Reinhart Boerner.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Thapar Reviews Gorsuch's 'A Republic'

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    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's new book "A Republic, If You Can Keep It" offers hope for our constitutional system through stories of American greatness, and sheds much-needed light on originalism for skeptics, says Sixth Circuit Judge Amul Thapar.