International Arbitration

  • September 13, 2019

    Asset Managers, Ex-Official Charged In PDVSA Case

    Two Swiss asset managers and a former Venezuelan minister have been charged in a U.S. case alleging contractors paid bribes for business with state-owned oil company Petroleos de Venezuela SA, according to an indictment made public on Friday.

  • September 13, 2019

    Morgan Lewis Gains McDermott Arbitration Pro In Frankfurt

    Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP has gained a former McDermott Will & Emery LLP international arbitration partner who has extensive experience handling both investor-state and commercial arbitration proceedings and has served as an arbitrator on various tribunals.

  • September 13, 2019

    Sater Can't Arbitrate Money Laundering Claims, NY Court Told

    The Kazakh city of Almaty and one of the country’s banks told a New York federal court Thursday that Felix Sater cannot pause a suit accusing him of helping to launder about $440 million in stolen money while a related arbitration is ongoing.

  • September 13, 2019

    Russia Can't Get Out Of Crimea Bank Seizure Award

    An international tribunal has refused to reconsider its decision holding that Russia unlawfully expropriated investments held in Crimea by Ukraine's largest commercial bank following its 2014 takeover of the peninsula.

  • September 13, 2019

    Canada Fights China's Canola Import Curbs At WTO

    Canada has lodged a World Trade Organization legal challenge against China, alleging in a document circulated Thursday that Beijing has blocked imports of Canadian canola seed using food safety restrictions that are not in line with international standards.

  • September 12, 2019

    2nd Circ. OKs Awards For Soured South Korean Satellite Deal

    The Second Circuit on Thursday confirmed two arbitral awards issued to a Bermuda-based satellite operator in a dispute stemming from a politically fraught transaction with a South Korean satellite communications provider, saying the arbitrators did not exceed their authority or disregard the law.

  • September 12, 2019

    School District Wants Insurance Claims Kept In State Court

    A Texas school district asked a federal court Wednesday to pause its suit against nine insurers seeking up to $10 million to cover property damage caused by Hurricane Harvey while it determines whether claims against domestic insurers belong in state court.

  • September 12, 2019

    Pelosi Says USMCA Still Needs Changes To Enforcement

    Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday that House Democrats still want substantive changes to the updated North American trade pact that's awaiting congressional ratification, expressing concern about how the United States would make sure its partners comply with the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement.

  • September 12, 2019

    Achmea Doesn't Bar OK Of $330M Award, DC Court Says

    A D.C. federal judge has confirmed a more than $330 million arbitral award against Romania that was issued to Swedish food investors, rejecting arguments that the court was foreclosed from doing so under the European Court of Justice's groundbreaking ruling in the Achmea case.

  • September 12, 2019

    EU Warns Of Brexit, Climate & Rate Risks To Finance Sector

    National regulators must takes steps to protect Europe’s banks and insurers from risks caused by the uncertainty around Brexit, persistently low interest rates and transitioning to a sustainable economy, the bloc’s three financial services watchdogs said Thursday.

  • September 11, 2019

    WTO Set For Collision Course Over US Metal Tariffs Next Year

    A day after the World Trade Organization said it will rule on the Trump administration’s national security tariffs on steel and aluminum next fall, the trade body on Wednesday said it also expects to issue a decision on the retaliatory tariffs imposed by other countries around the same time.

  • September 11, 2019

    Texas Court Pauses $1M Harvey Coverage Suit

    A Texas federal judge has agreed to pause a Houston-based real estate company’s suit seeking more than $1 million from insurers for Hurricane Harvey damage while the parties participate in mediation.

  • September 11, 2019

    FCA Rolls Out Measures To Ensure Firms Ready For Brexit

    The Financial Conduct Authority stepped up efforts on Wednesday to ensure that banks and insurers protect themselves against the threat of a no-deal Brexit amid continued legal chaos over the U.K.'s impending withdrawal from the European Union.

  • September 11, 2019

    Oil Co. Seeks Arbitration Against Russian Bank, Refinery

    A Swiss oil company said Wednesday that it is seeking arbitration in London to resolve a dispute worth several hundred million dollars against a Russian-owned bank and a Russian oil refinery it once worked with over their "damaging" actions.

  • September 11, 2019

    Locke Lord Nabs Dispute Resolution Partner In London

    Locke Lord LLP announced it has hired a partner with experience in complex international disputes to boost its business litigation practice in London.

  • September 11, 2019

    Scottish Judges Rule Suspension Of UK Parliament Unlawful

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s decision to suspend Parliament for five weeks in the run-up to the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline is unlawful and motivated by the “improper purpose of stymying Parliament,” Scotland’s highest civil court ruled on Wednesday.

  • September 10, 2019

    Gabon Avoids $49M Default In Award Fight With Turkish Co.

    A D.C federal court has rejected a Turkish construction company’s attempt to enter a $49 million default against the African nation of Gabon over an unresolved international arbitration award, saying Gabon didn’t default as it made payments upon receiving notice of the U.S. proceedings.

  • September 10, 2019

    Kazakhstan Urges DC Circ. To Revive $506M Arb. Fight

    Kazakhstan asked the D.C. Circuit to revive its attempt to escape a $506 million arbitration award, arguing that the lower court applied a “non-existent” exception in tossing the Asian country’s case.

  • September 10, 2019

    GE Must Refer Disputes In $2.6B Deal To Experts, Suit Says

    A Swiss electrical equipment manufacturer has sued General Electric, asking a New York federal court to force GE to refer a $36 million dispute to independent experts stemming from their $2.6 billion deal for GE's electrical parts company.

  • September 10, 2019

    WTO Won't Rule On Trump's Security Tariffs Until Next Fall

    The World Trade Organization won’t render a decision on the legality of the Trump administration’s national security-based tariffs on steel and aluminum until the autumn of 2020 at the earliest, the panel weighing the complaints said in a notice published Tuesday.

  • September 10, 2019

    IAAF OKs 11 More Russians Amid Team's Doping Ban

    The International Association of Athletics Federations said Tuesday that 11 more Russian track and field athletes have been approved to compete in international competition under a neutral flag ahead of the world championships later this month, despite a continued suspension of the Russian Athletics Federation over a state-sponsored doping scandal.

  • September 10, 2019

    FCA Delays Data Rule Review To Make Way For Brexit

    Britain's financial services watchdog has paused its review of how technological advancements in the use of data will affect wholesale markets, saying banks and other financial firms should focus all their energy on preparing for Brexit.

  • September 09, 2019

    Brazilian VW Dealers Can't Get $2.5M Award Confirmed

    Brazilian Volkswagen distributors have lost their bid to confirm a $2.5 million arbitration award against the Reynolds and Reynolds Co., with an Ohio federal judge finding dismissal is warranted as the U.S. company is not bound by the arbitration agreements at issue.

  • September 09, 2019

    Ex-Vietnam PM Hit With $2.75B Claim Over Nixed Power Plants

    An economist and entrepreneur is seeking at least $2.75 billion from Vietnam's former prime minister in arbitration related to a stymied power plant project.

  • September 09, 2019

    Insurers, Real Estate Co. Look To Mediate $1M Harvey Fight

    A Houston-based real estate company and QBE, Lloyd's underwriters and other insurers have asked a Texas federal court to pause a $1 million battle for damages caused by Hurricane Harvey while they try to negotiate a settlement. 

Expert Analysis

  • The Factors Courts Consider In Deposition Location Disputes

    Author Photo

    In the absence of a federal rule governing deposition location, federal courts are frequently called on to resolve objections to out-of-state deposition notices. Recent decisions reveal what information is crucial to courts in making the determination, says Kevin O’Brien at Porter Wright.

  • What To Consider Before Filing For A Rule 57 Speedy Hearing

    Author Photo

    Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 57 and its state counterparts provide a method for expediting claims for declaratory judgment that warrants closer attention than it has historically received from litigants and courts, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • How Hague Enforcement Initiative Compares To EU Regimes

    Author Photo

    The Hague Conference on Private International Law's latest convention on cross-border enforcement may create an international dispute resolution framework, and could provide the U.K. with useful alternatives to EU regimes in the event of a no-deal Brexit. However, it is not guaranteed to be a true game-changer, say Andrew Stafford and James Chapman-Booth of Kobre & Kim.

  • NY Law May Remain Best Bet For Enforcing Foreign Awards

    Author Photo

    The scope of the recently adopted Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in Civil or Commercial Matters is more limited than New York's Article 53, which raises the question of whether the U.S. should ratify it, say Oksana Wright and Philip Langer of Fox Rothschild.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: Expanding The Meaning Of Diversity

    Author Photo

    My conservative, Catholic parents never skipped a beat when accepting that I was gay, and encouraged me to follow my dreams wherever they might lead. But I did not expect they would lead to the law, until I met an inspiring college professor, says James Holmes of Clyde & Co.

  • How The Wayback Machine Can Strengthen Your Case

    Author Photo

    The Wayback Machine, which archives screenshots of websites at particular points in time, can be an invaluable tool in litigation, but attorneys need to follow a few simple steps early in the discovery process to increase the odds of being able to use materials obtained from the archive, says Timothy Freeman of Tanenbaum Keale.

  • Opinion

    Draft Civil Procedure Jurisdictional Rule Needs A Tweak

    Author Photo

    The Judicial Conference Advisory Committee’s proposed addition to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 7.1 needs to be amended slightly to prevent late-stage jurisdictional confusion in cases where the parties do not have attributed citizenship, says GianCarlo Canaparo at The Heritage Foundation.

  • New Best Practices Under E-Discovery Spoliation Rule

    Author Photo

    The amended Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 37(e) provides explicit criteria for imposing sanctions when electronically stored information has been lost during discovery, but courts are still not consistently applying the new rule, with some simply ignoring it in favor of inherent authority, say Matthew Hamilton and Donna Fisher at Pepper Hamilton.

  • How Law Firms Can Create Content Decision Makers Will Read

    Author Photo

    According to our recent survey, the one simple attribute that attracts both in-house counsel and C-suite executives to content is utility, but it’s also clear that both groups define utility differently and prefer different content types, says John Corey of Greentarget.

  • The Future Of Int'l Mediation After The Singapore Convention

    Author Photo

    The Singapore Convention, signed by the U.S. this month, aims to make mediated international settlement agreements as easily enforceable as international arbitration awards, but the differences between the mediation and arbitration processes could pose a possible impediment to the success of the convention, says Gilbert Samberg at Mintz.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Finance Can And Should Protect Its Reputation

    Author Photo

    This month’s controversy surrounding alleged financial misrepresentations by Burford Capital underlines the need for litigation financiers to unite in educating the public about the value of litigation finance, lest opportunists use cases like this to disparage the industry as a whole, says Charles Agee at Westfleet Advisors.

  • Crisis Messaging To Protect Law Firm Brand And Bottom Line

    Author Photo

    When crises occur, such as data security incidents or gender bias suits, a well-prepared law firm has a thoroughly tested communications plan at the ready, which ensures the firm is the most proactive news source, prevents the crisis from escalating and notifies stakeholders about mitigation efforts, says Zach Olsen at Infinite Global.

  • The Escalating Sanctions Against Venezuela, Russia And Iran

    Author Photo

    The past few weeks saw a flurry of activity demonstrating that imposition and enforcement of economic sanctions against Venezuela, Russia and Iran — and by extension China — continues to be a key driver for the Trump administration in confronting foreign policy challenges, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Perspectives

    What You Should Know About Courtroom Closures

    Author Photo

    At attorney Greg Craig’s trial in D.C. federal court this week, the courtroom was cleared so prospective jurors could answer sensitive questions. Even seasoned litigators were left wondering about the nature of this subtle, yet significant, issue involving Sixth Amendment public trial rights, says Luke Cass at Quarles & Brady.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Seaweed Scientist's Odyssey

    Author Photo

    In the early 1980s, I was working on my Ph.D. in marine biology and ecology. As part of an international team of scientists studying oil spill impacts on marine ecosystems, I saw a niche opportunity to combine science and law, says Andrew Davis of Shipman & Goodwin.