International Arbitration

  • January 24, 2020

    17 WTO Members Agree To Set Up Interim Appeals System

    A group of 17 World Trade Organization members led by the European Union, Canada and China agreed Friday to set up a temporary system for appealing trade disputes, offering a makeshift fix for an impasse that hobbled Geneva's legal wing last year.

  • January 24, 2020

    IP Hires: Squire Patton Boggs, MoFo, K&L Gates

    Squire Patton Boggs and Morrison & Foerster have both boosted their intellectual property work with lawyers from Venable, while K&L Gates nabbed a sports attorney who helps with IP rights. 

  • January 23, 2020

    Myanmar Ruling Hailed As Global Step Against Genocide

    The International Court of Justice has ordered Myanmar to halt the genocide of its Muslim minority population, a significant ruling that's expected to stop other nations from turning a blind eye to the alleged atrocities, according to a lawyer who obtained a similar ruling in the infamous 1990s Balkan genocide dispute.

  • January 23, 2020

    Quinn Adds Dechert Atty To Sovereign Disputes Group

    A seasoned Dechert LLP lawyer known for his expertise in cross-border insolvency work has jumped ship to join Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP as a partner and become head of its sovereign litigation practice, according to the law firm.

  • January 23, 2020

    Squire Patton Boggs Nabs Ex-Venable Patent Pro

    Squire Patton Boggs LLP has brought on a former Venable LLP partner with more than two decades of litigation experience across a broad range of technologies, the firm has announced.

  • January 23, 2020

    Credit Suisse Denies Knowledge Of $2B Mozambique Scam

    Swiss lender Credit Suisse denied knowing about a $2 billion fraud and bribery scam tied to loans the bank made to Mozambique, rejecting the African country’s claims that it’s liable for the actions of three of its former employees.

  • January 23, 2020

    UK Regulators Must Face Scrutiny After Brexit, Report Urges

    Parliament must scrutinize Britain’s finance watchdogs to ensure they protect the country's markets after Brexit, as they will no longer be held to account by the European Union, regulatory experts warned on Thursday.

  • January 22, 2020

    Iranian Investors No Longer Eligible For US Travel On E Visas

    Iranians traveling to the U.S. for investment and international trade purposes can no longer enter or extend their stays with E Visas, U.S. immigration officials announced Wednesday, weeks after the U.S. assassination of Iranian General Qasem Soleimani and amid increasing scrutiny of Iranian immigrants.

  • January 22, 2020

    5th Circ. Asked To Revisit OK Of Wind Investors' $63M Award

    The American arm of China's state-run aerospace corporation has urged the Fifth Circuit to reconsider its decision to enforce a $62.9 million arbitral award in favor of fellow investors in a failed wind energy joint venture, saying the decision threatens to "eviscerate" safeguards essential to ensuring fairness.

  • January 22, 2020

    Reinsurers Object To Redo Of $150M PR Hurricane Dispute

    A group of reinsurers is urging a Puerto Rico federal judge to stick with his decision to send an insolvent insurer's $150 million suit over hurricane damage reinsurance claims to arbitration, saying the insurers’ arguments are either old or too late.

  • January 22, 2020

    4th Circ. Won't Revive Commodities Firm's Oil Deal Suit

    The Fourth Circuit on Wednesday refused to revive a Swiss commodities trading company's suit accusing executives of a British Virgin Islands petroleum company of costing it at least $30 million through misrepresentations on a deal to transport fuel from Iraq.

  • January 22, 2020

    GCs Must Brace For AI-Based Litigation Risks

    As in-house lawyers embrace artificial intelligence, they should get ahead of growing litigation risks by beefing up their compliance departments and preparing for breaches, according to a report released Wednesday by Crowell & Moring LLP.

  • January 22, 2020

    Trump Revives Tariff Threat Against EU Cars

    President Donald Trump renewed his threat to set tariffs on cars imported from the European Union on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum on Wednesday, upping the pressure on Brussels to strike a broad-ranging trade agreement with the U.S.

  • January 22, 2020

    UK Cybercrime Laws Need Reform, Report Says

    Britain’s cybercrime laws need to be brought into the 21st century, according to a legal report published Thursday that warns outdated rules could lead to courts prosecuting professionals who have ethical motives for accessing company data.

  • January 21, 2020

    Justices Zero In On Consent In Steel Plant Arbitration Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday stressed that parties must consent to arbitration as it considered whether to allow nonsignatories to an international arbitration agreement to force arbitration of a dispute, an unsettled area of U.S. law that critics say has caused uncertainty for the international business community.

  • January 21, 2020

    Migrants Fleeing Enviro Danger Can't Be Deported, UN Says

    A United Nations panel has said that refugees can't be deported to countries where they would face life-threatening dangers from climate change, opening a door for people who can show they are at risk of climate-induced danger to win protection.

  • January 21, 2020

    Bill Would Cut Off US Intel For Allies That Use Huawei For 5G

    A bill introduced in the House on Tuesday would block the government from sharing intelligence with foreign countries that allow parts from a Chinese telecommunications company in next-generation networks.

  • January 21, 2020

    EU Concludes Round Of Trade Talks With 5 African Nations

    The European Union has wrapped up preliminary discussions with five African countries aimed at building on an existing agreement to offer the nations duty-free and quota-free access to the European market.

  • January 21, 2020

    Dentons Ducked Share Of $1.7M Tab In Fee Battle, Suit Says

    Dentons US LLP and a Virginia company have been accused of failing to pay a $1.7 million arbitration award for attorney fees that was issued almost a year ago, according to a suit filed in New York state court.

  • January 17, 2020

    Up Next At High Court: Arbitration, Church-State Separation

    Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. may be presiding over the third presidential impeachment in American history, but over at the U.S. Supreme Court it's business as usual, with he and his colleagues set to close out the January argument session with a pair of cases involving international arbitration and church-state separation.

  • January 17, 2020

    Tribunal Orders Pacific Drilling To Pay Samsung Unit $320M

    A London tribunal has ordered the Luxembourg drill ship company Pacific Drilling SA to pay $320 million to Samsung Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., one of the world's largest shipbuilders, following a dispute over a soured $517.5 million contract to construct an ultra-deepwater drillship.

  • January 17, 2020

    Chevron Owes $18B Arbitration Payout, Saudis Tell 9th Circ.

    Saudi families claiming to be the titleholders of oil lands leased to a Chevron Corp. predecessor have urged the Ninth Circuit to enforce a $17.9 billion arbitration award against the oil giant, saying the lower court wrongly concluded it lacked jurisdiction and relied on "incompetent and not credible evidence."

  • January 17, 2020

    Hinshaw Hires Experienced Insurance Partner For NY Office

    Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP said it has added a seasoned attorney with a broad background in complex insurance coverage issues and trial experience as a partner in the law firm's global insurance services practice group in its New York office.

  • January 17, 2020

    BigLaw Arbitration Specialists Are Among 114 New QCs

    Six international arbitration lawyers from Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP, White & Case LLP, Herbert Smith Freehills LLP, Blackstone Chambers and Clyde & Co. LLP are among the 114 new Queen's Counsel who will formally become silks in March.

  • January 17, 2020

    Mining Co. Says Tanzania Illegally Took Over Its Project Site

    An investor in a U.K.-based mining company said it plans to institute arbitration proceedings against Tanzania after the East African nation allegedly took over a project site in violation of international law.

Expert Analysis

  • ABA Rules For Departing Attys Set Unprecedented Limits

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    Groundbreaking rules from the American Bar Association impose new standards on how law firms can govern departing lawyers’ contact with clients, placing major restrictions on this ubiquitous practice, say Amy Richardson and Hilary Gerzhoy at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Recent Developments Show Importance Of Int'l Sport Court

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    Ian Blackshaw, a member of the Court of Arbitration for Sport, provides an overview of the court and analyzes recent changes and cases, including a hearing on the Russian athletes' ban by the World Anti-Doping Agency.

  • Nissan Ex-CEO Illustrates Do's And Don'ts Of Image Repair

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    Lawyers can draw a number of useful lessons about reputation management from the efforts of former Nissan executive Carlos Ghosn — who recently escaped house arrest in Tokyo — to restore his sullied reputation, says Elizabeth Ortega at ECO Strategic Communications.

  • 3 Concerns If Your Witness Becomes Flippant At Deposition

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    In light of a recent Delaware Supreme Court case in which a litigator was rebuked for failing to control his evasive witness during a deposition, attorneys should consider when they may be held responsible for client misconduct and what to do if a client crosses the line, says Philip Sechler of Robbins Russell.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • How International Trade May Play Out In 2020

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    Despite the tumult the Trump administration's actions have created in international trade, the president's attempt at long-term disruption of global markets is unlikely to be successful, says Peter Quinter at GrayRobinson.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

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    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • Deciphering Tribunals' Practice In Investor-State Arbitration

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    Our recent study of 114 publicly available decisions on provisional measures in investor-state proceedings reveals key trends in arbitration tribunal jurisprudence, say David Goldberg and Ivan Philippov of White & Case, and professor Yarik Kryvoi of the British Institute of International and Comparative Law.

  • 7 Insider Tips For Working With In-House Counsel

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    For outside firms wondering how to best support busy in-house lawyers, several practices can help navigate critical legal issues and novel business challenges while strengthening the working relationship, says Virginia Hudson, associate general counsel at Capital One.

  • 50 Years Later, Interpretive Challenges Remain For RICO

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    In the 50 years since the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was passed, courts' attempts to clarify the statute have had some success, but many interpretive dilemmas remain unresolved, says Randy Gordon of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • 7 Ethics Tips For Lawyers' Pretrial Social Media Use

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    As ethical constraints on pretrial social media use evolve, the American Bar Association's Model Rules and several court opinions provide guidance on avoiding violations when collecting evidence, researching jurors and friending judges, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Mark Davis at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Opinion

    States Should Not Follow ABA On Attorney Conduct Rules

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    Because the American Bar Association's new rule on diversity continues to use the Model Rules of Professional Conduct as a cultural bludgeon, states should create independent codes limited to constitutionally valid purposes of attorney regulation, says Bradley Abramson of Alliance Defending Freedom.

  • How Courts And Litigants Can Benefit From Special Masters

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    As we approach the first anniversary of the American Bar Association's adoption of guidelines for the appointment and use of special masters in civil litigation, retired U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin, now at Stroock, explains how special masters can help parties and courts with faster decision-making and subject matter expertise.

  • Uber Policy Calls For Refresher On ABA Confidentiality Rules

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    Uber's recent policy update allowing drivers to audio-record passenger rides is a reminder for lawyers to observe the highest standard of care in protecting client information under the American Bar Association's confidentiality model rule, says Paul Boehm at Williams & Connolly.

  • 4 Simple Rules For Witness Note Taking

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    Witness notes that form the center of a plaintiff’s case have largely been replaced by digital systems, but they remain on defense counsel’s radar, and with proper safeguards can be a witness's best friend, says Matthew Keenan at Shook Hardy.