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International Arbitration

  • March 21, 2019

    Donziger Still Defying Court In $9.5B Ecuador Fight: Chevron

    Chevron Corp. told a New York federal judge Wednesday that new evidence proves attorney Steven Donziger flouted an order barring him from profiting off a fraudulent $9.5 billion judgment in an Ecuadorian environmental case, saying his “brazen” misdeeds warrant sanctions.

  • March 21, 2019

    FIFA Bans Ex-Soccer Official For Life In Bribery Scandal

    FIFA’s ethics committee has found Luis Chiriboga, former president of the Ecuadorian Football Association, guilty of accepting bribes in exchange for handing broadcasters the rights to South American soccer tournaments, banning him for life from the sport, FIFA announced Thursday.

  • March 21, 2019

    EU Offers UK Limited Delay To Stave Off A No-Deal Brexit

    European Union leaders said Thursday that Britain will be allowed to delay its departure from the bloc until May 22 on the condition that the government's withdrawal agreement gains parliamentary approval in the U.K. next week.

  • March 21, 2019

    EU Issues New Rules For Screening Foreign Investments

    The European Union published new rules Thursday for screening inbound foreign investments that go into effect next month, following the same overall structure of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States.

  • March 21, 2019

    Prepare Now For Hard Brexit, FCA Tells EU Finance Firms

    Financial services companies in Europe must register with the Financial Conduct Authority before March 29 if they want to continue serving clients in the U.K., the watchdog said, as it warned that it cannot rule out "volatility and disruption" if there is a no-deal Brexit.

  • March 20, 2019

    What’s In A Judgeship? More Than Meets The Eye

    Figuring out what constitutes a manageable workload for the nation’s district judges is no simple task. Getting the judiciary the resources it needs is even harder.

  • March 20, 2019

    Swamped: How Magistrate Judges Salvaged Louisiana's Judicial Crisis

    The Western District of Louisiana is supposed to have seven district judges. But for a year, most of the courthouses were operating without a single Article III judge. As usual, magistrate judges picked up the slack.

  • March 20, 2019

    Panama Unit Owners Can't Pause Row With Trump Hotel Cos.

    The owners of the majority of units in a Trump-branded Panamanian luxury hotel cannot pause their suit against two Trump hotel management companies pending the resolution of related arbitration proceedings, with a New York federal judge ruling that a stay was not necessary.

  • March 20, 2019

    Trump Says Tariffs Will Stay Even After China Strikes Deal

    President Donald Trump offered a glimpse of his ongoing trade discussions with China on Wednesday, signaling that he will not immediately remove the tariffs he has imposed on $250 billion worth of Chinese goods if the U.S. and Beijing are able to strike a new agreement.

  • March 20, 2019

    Chemical Plant Scores $1.1M Judgment In Pipe Deal Dispute

    A New York federal judge has slapped a Long Island steel pipe purveyor with a nearly $1.1 million judgment in a state-owned Ukrainian chemical plant's suit seeking confirmation of an arbitration award stemming from a botched sales deal.

  • March 20, 2019

    Municipal Fights Reinsurer's Appeal Of Asbestos Loss Claims

    Municipal Mutual Insurance Ltd. urged a London appeals court Wednesday to uphold an arbitration ruling that allowed the now-defunct insurer to choose the year of reinsurance to which it could allocate asbestos-related losses.

  • March 20, 2019

    Deadlocked May Appeals To EU For 3-Month Brexit Delay

    Prime Minister Theresa May formally asked the European Union on Wednesday to delay Britain’s departure from the EU for three months until June 30 as she seeks to prevent the country from crashing out of the bloc without a deal next week.

  • March 19, 2019

    ‘In A Timely Manner’: Three Decades Of Judgeship Bills

    Partisanship has played a large role in the small passage rate of new judgeship bills since 1990. New judgeships create new vacancies, and neither party wants to give the other the upper hand.

  • March 19, 2019

    From Showdowns To Hotlines, Frazzled Judges Get Creative

    Using magistrate hotlines, “showdown” hearings and extra mediation, many courts with heavy dockets have pioneered methods for moving cases along. But not every program succeeds, and the techniques have their detractors.

  • March 19, 2019

    Churchill Mining Can't Revive $1.3B Claim Against Indonesia

    Churchill Mining PLC said Tuesday that it failed to revive a $1.3 billion claim against Indonesia over canceled coal mining rights, with an annulment committee finding that the arbitral tribunal gave the British company a “genuine opportunity to be heard.”

  • March 19, 2019

    $45M Faulty-Motor Row Should Go Back To State Court: Judge

    An Alabama federal magistrate judge on Tuesday recommended sending a $45 million dispute between a French unit of General Electric Co. and an Alabama steel plant owner over allegedly faulty motors back to state court, noting that the GE unit's arbitration defense has been rejected by the Eleventh Circuit.

  • March 19, 2019

    Guaido Re-Ups Bid To Enter $1.2B Crystallex Award Fight

    Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó pushed back against arguments that his government be excluded from a Third Circuit appeal over the seizure of shares in Citgo Petroleum Corp.'s parent company to enforce a $1.2 billion arbitral award to Crystallex International Corp., saying Venezuela's input is needed.

  • March 19, 2019

    Fruit Grower's Contracts May Be Resold To Pay $32M Award

    A Florida federal judge on Monday ordered one of Costa Rica’s largest pineapple growers to show why the court shouldn’t seize and resell the grower’s contract rights with a fruit importer to satisfy a $32 million arbitration award for Del Monte.

  • March 19, 2019

    WTO Will Give Final Word On Boeing Subsidies This Month

    The World Trade Organization's Appellate Body on Tuesday said it will issue its decision in the European Union's case against U.S. subsidies to aircraft giant The Boeing Co. by March 28, nudging the sprawling 15-year legal saga closer to an end.

  • March 19, 2019

    Standard Life Wins Battle With Lloyds Over £100B Assets

    Standard Life Aberdeen PLC said on Tuesday that a tribunal has ruled that Lloyds Banking Group was wrong to sever a contract under which the investment company managed £100 billion ($133 billion) of pension assets, following a year-long dispute between the financial groups.

Expert Analysis

  • US Policy On Cuba Litigation Comes With Risks For Cos.

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    A newly effective embargo measure that allows U.S. claimants to sue the Cuban government in U.S. courts for confiscated Cuban property may soon be expanded to permit lawsuits against non-Cuban entities operating in Cuba. Attorneys at Greenberg Traurig LLP discuss key issues surrounding the policy change.

  • Lenders Score Major High Court Victory In Foreclosure Case

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling on Wednesday in Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus LLP removes nearly all activities taken by creditors seeking nonjudicial foreclosure of liens and mortgages from the ambit of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, says John Baxter of Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP.

  • A 3rd-Party Funder’s Perspective On Navigating Sharia Law

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    Sharia law is an impediment to third-party funding only insofar as it is perceived as such. Professional funders have the knowledge, experience and means to overcome the potential hurdles, say Yasmin Mohammad and Anastasia Davis Bondarenko of Vannin Capital PCC.

  • Tech Trends From SXSW Pose Unique Questions For Lawyers

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    These days, a popular theme in media is that lawyers' jobs will be taken by robots. However, based on the tech issues discussed at the South by Southwest technology conference in Austin, Texas, last month, robots may in fact need lawyers, says Nick Abrahams of Norton Rose Fulbright.

  • Is 'Manifest Disregard' Defense Only Mostly Dead In Texas?

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    While Texas state courts have barred use of the "manifest disregard of the law" defense in international arbitration matters, recent cases in the Fifth Circuit describe the doctrine alternatively as “alive but not well,” “dead,” or “triumphantly ‘back from the dead,” say James Rogers and Clarissa Medrano of Akerman LLP.

  • In Bar Admissions Process, It's Candor Or Bust

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    You passed the bar exam and are ready for the character and fitness committee interview. Time to think about how to discuss that minor incident in college, that misdemeanor in high school or that mental health issue that you have totally under control, says Richard Maltz of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Bashant Reviews 'Doing Justice'

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    My initial reaction to "Doing Justice" was that author Preet Bharara may have bitten off more than he could chew — an accusation leveled against him when he served as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York — but I found the book full of helpful gems, says U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California.

  • Firms Can Leverage Communications When Economy Is Slow

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    Though most experts believe that an imminent recession is unlikely, slowdown fears are increasing. Now is the time for firms to consider how to best leverage their communications and marketing teams to lessen impacts from a potential economic slowdown, says Tom Orewyler of Tom Orewyler Communications LLC.

  • Cyprus Gains Legal Tool In ICJ Ruling On Chagos Islands

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    The United Kingdom has been told by the International Court of Justice to relinquish administration of the Chagos Islands to Mauritius. This has implications for another former British colony where the U.K. retains control over certain territory: Cyprus, says Constantinos Yiallourides of the British Institute of International and Comparative Law.

  • The Future Of The USMCA: 3 Possible Scenarios

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    The Trump administration would like Congress to pass the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement by June, but progress has been slow. The deal's fate will depend on cooperation from Democrats, support from Republicans and the strategy pursued by the president, says Robert Kyle of Hogan Lovells.