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Media & Entertainment

  • February 19, 2019

    Yelp Rejects Paralegal's Claim It Dominates Google Searches

    Yelp asked a California federal court Tuesday to toss a paralegal's antitrust and racial discrimination suit accusing it of monopolizing Google's search results and refusing him equal treatment, arguing it has no control over Google results and doesn't make business contracts that favor "non-African-American individuals."

  • February 19, 2019

    High Court Roundup: Cert. Denials; EFF To File Amicus Brief

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday turned down appeals in several patent cases, including one by a Schlumberger Ltd. unit to revive its oil exploration patents that were at issue in another high court case over patent damages, while allowing the Electronic Frontier Foundation to file an amicus brief in a case asking if the government is a "person" that can challenge patents in America Invents Act reviews.

  • February 19, 2019

    Law360's Tort Report: Personal Injury & Med Mal News In Brief

    A New Jersey utility’s $19.2 million settlement of a fatal gas explosion suit and medical malpractice litigation over the death of Jefferson Airplane singer Marty Balin lead Law360’s Tort Report this week, an occasional feature that compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news items that may have flown under the radar.

  • February 19, 2019

    Broadcasters Warn Against Sharing On 6 GHz Band

    The National Association of Broadcasters on Tuesday joined other groups in telling the Federal Communications Commission that it should be cautious about opening up the 6-gigahertz band, which is set aside for broadcast and satellite transmissions, to shared uses by unlicensed devices.

  • February 19, 2019

    Facebook Manager Used Racial Slurs, Worker Tells 4th Circ.

    A black Facebook facilities worker urged the Fourth Circuit to revive his suit accusing the social media giant of denying him a promotion because of his race, arguing there was undisputed evidence his ex-boss frequently used racial epithets.

  • February 19, 2019

    Thomas Wants To Open Up Libel Laws. Don't Count On It.

    Overturning decades of U.S. Supreme Court case law that shields the media from defamation lawsuits — as suggested Tuesday by Justice Clarence Thomas — would be as radical as it sounds, and First Amendment experts say it's unlikely the rest of the court has any appetite for doing so.

  • February 19, 2019

    FCC's Draft Broadband Report OKs Industry Progress

    The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission circulated a draft report on Tuesday that concludes internet service is being reasonably and quickly rolled out nationwide, and while commissioners must still vote to approve the findings, it's already drawing some criticism.

  • February 19, 2019

    Don't Expand Broadcast Viewer Discount, Group Tells FCC

    Advocacy group Common Cause expressed outrage on Tuesday at suggestions that a break on the Federal Communications Commission’s national audience cap should extend to all TV stations, calling the move a “blatant ... land grab” that would expand rather than diminish a regulatory loophole.

  • February 19, 2019

    'Fortnite' Hack Exposed Player Payment Info, Suit Claims

    Epic Games Inc., the company behind online video game "Fortnite," failed to adequately protect players' accounts, opening the door for hackers to steal sensitive information like payment details in a digital breach in 2018, according to a proposed class action filed Friday in Illinois state court.

  • February 19, 2019

    US Trade Group Warns Against Europewide 5G Standards

    U.S. wireless trade association CTIA distanced itself from a global trade group's call for a Europewide testing regime on 5G network equipment, arguing that a secure supply chain for next-generation networks is a global issue, and competition would suffer if that chain is governed inconsistently.

  • February 19, 2019

    Horse-Racing Bettor Seeks Sanctions In NJ Doping Suit

    An Illinois bettor who claims a New Jersey horse-racing enterprise gives its racers performance-enhancing drugs has asked a federal court to impose sanctions over a veterinarian’s handling of discovery requests relating to treatment of the allegedly doped animals.

  • February 19, 2019

    Tesla Blasts 'Baseless' Claims In Sudden-Acceleration Suit

    Tesla has asked a California federal court to throw out renewed claims by a South Korean actor and musician that the car maker sold vehicles knowing they abruptly accelerated for no reason and newly added accusations that the automaker defamed the entertainer in defending itself, calling the claims "baseless."

  • February 19, 2019

    Justices Deny NY Station's Bid To Review FCC Channel Move

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday denied a petition for writ of certiorari from a New York-area television station that sought review of the D.C. Circuit's support of a Federal Communications Commission decision to assign it a higher broadcast channel as a result of the transition to digital broadcasting.

  • February 19, 2019

    Thomas Urges High Court To Rethink Landmark Press Rulings

    Justice Clarence Thomas on Tuesday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to revisit landmark First Amendment rulings after the court refused to tackle a defamation case lodged against Bill Cosby by one of his rape accusers.

  • February 15, 2019

    The $1B Question: Can Puerto Rico Afford Its Bankruptcy Bills?

    Law firms and other professional service providers are seeking more than $300 million in bills for Puerto Rico’s unprecedented restructuring — a figure that is eventually expected to surpass $1 billion. Some local attorneys are questioning the costs.

  • February 15, 2019

    Puerto Rico’s Law Firms Find Their Footing After Disaster

    Out of disaster comes opportunity. That is what the corporate legal community of Puerto Rico found after Hurricane Maria. But for many attorneys, the recovery is personal, too.

  • February 18, 2019

    UK Lawmakers Brand Facebook 'Digital Gangsters' In Report

    U.K. lawmakers labeled Facebook and its executives as "digital gangsters" in a scathing report issued Monday and called for regulators to police social media companies to stop fake news from skewing public perception of issues of national importance, including the Brexit campaign.

  • February 15, 2019

    Partial Gag Order Issued In Roger Stone WikiLeaks Case

    A Washington, D.C., federal judge on Friday issued a gag order prohibiting Roger Stone, a longtime ally of President Donald Trump, and witnesses and attorneys in his WikiLeaks criminal case stemming from the Russia probe from making public statements that could “inflame” the crowds that have gathered at his court appearances.

  • February 15, 2019

    Disney Wants Atty Docs In VidAngel Streaming IP Row

    Disney and the streaming service VidAngel Inc., which Disney and other studios have accused of infringement, have asked a California court to sort out a dispute over whether VidAngel must hand over attorney documents in discovery after VidAngel defended itself by saying its counsel advised it that its services were legal.

  • February 15, 2019

    'Fearless Girl' Artist Sold Unauthorized Statues, TM Suit Says

    The artist who created the Fearless Girl sold unauthorized copies of the famous feminist statue in violation of trademark law and agreements with State Street Global Advisors Trust Co., which commissioned the artwork, the company has argued in a New York state court suit.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Ways To Reduce Risk Under Ill. Biometric Privacy Law

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's decision last month in Rosenbach v. Six Flags resolves much of the uncertainty about when an individual may bring suit under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act. Now is the time for companies to ensure BIPA compliance, say attorneys with Fenwick & West LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Problem With 'Optimal' Diversity

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    Organizations should seek to avoid discrimination, but they should also be wary of the idea that diverse teams function better than nondiverse teams, because this reasoning lacks evidence and can lead to a slippery slope, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research LLC.

  • The Growing Use Of Anti-SLAPP In Employment Cases

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    The strength of an anti-SLAPP statute hinges on its text. In states with strong legislation, courts have found that certain adverse employment actions implicate constitutional rights and fall within the purview of the law, say Jana Baker and Victoria Vish of Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC.

  • State Net

    States May Take The Lead On Regulating AI

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    While artificial intelligence promises to revolutionize the way we live and work, there has been relatively little government regulation targeting it specifically. But legislation referring to AI is currently pending in at least 13 states, and more may be on the way, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • 5 Considerations For Both Sides In Stadium Naming Deals

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    The stadium and arena naming rights deal market remains highly active. The complexity of these agreements and the importance of the terms are growing, say Ryan Davis and Steve Smith of Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP.

  • Recent Trends In FTC Consumer Protection Enforcement

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    The Federal Trade Commission is focusing its enforcement efforts on financial services, web services and emerging technologies, data security and consumer privacy, telecommunications, and health care — these five areas represented 88 percent of consumer protection actions in 2017 and 2018, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Opinion

    The Road To Legal Sports Betting: From Ethics To Economics

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    Recent state bills show how far the views of gambling have moved from the ethics of Major League Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis after the 1919 Black Sox scandal to pure dollars and cents, says Ronald Katz of GCA Law Partners LLP.

  • Lowered Bar For BIPA Lawsuits Will Raise Insurance Issues

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent ruling in Rosenbach v. Six Flags is likely to continue the proliferation of Biometric Information Privacy Act litigation, in turn leading to more insurance coverage disputes over whether BIPA claims involve "personal and advertising injury" or "property damage," says Jonathan Viner of Nicolaides Fink Thorpe Michaelides Sullivan LLP.

  • Fresh Takes On Seeking Costs And Fees Under Rule 45

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    Recent case law reveals that courts vary widely in their approaches to shifting the costs and fees incurred in responding to a Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 45 subpoena. Nonparties responding to such requests should consider certain district court trends, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • 3 Steps To Get Ahead Of ADA Web Accessibility Issues

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    Recent web accessibility cases — like a class action targeting Beyonce's website — highlight the lack of guidance in the Americans with Disabilities Act. But there are a few ways to make web content more accessible and reduce exposure to ADA claims, says Amihai Miron, co-founder and CEO of User1st.