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Media & Entertainment

  • April 24, 2019

    Ex-Atty, ‘Housewife’ Too Smart To Play Dumb To Fraud: Feds

    A disbarred Maryland attorney and former "Real Housewives" cast member is feigning ignorance to skirt charges that she stole millions from investors, prosecutors told a D.C. federal jury Wednesday, as they argued that the former lawyer is too “highly educated” to not have caught on to such an “obvious scam."

  • April 24, 2019

    Calif. Leaders OK Changes Curtailing Landmark Privacy Law

    California lawmakers have advanced eight industry-backed amendments that would scale back the scope of the state's landmark privacy law, including by changing how the law defines personal information.

  • April 24, 2019

    FTC Fines Online Dress-Up Game Over Kid Privacy Violations

    The company and owners behind virtual dress-up game i-Dressup.com have agreed to pay a $35,000 civil penalty to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to end a lawsuit over alleged children's privacy violations, according to court filings.

  • April 24, 2019

    LL Cool J Scores Easy Win In 'Rock The Bells' Trademark Suit

    A California concert promoter used the name of one of LL Cool J's most famous songs without his permission, a California federal judge has ruled, giving the hip hop mogul an easy win and ordering the entertainment company to stop infringing the song name.

  • April 24, 2019

    Questlove, Black Thought To Be Deposed In Roots Profits Row

    A Philadelphia judge ordered two leaders of the hip-hop band the Roots Tuesday to appear for deposition in a lawsuit alleging they cut a former bassist out of the group's profits after they didn't appear for scheduled depositions earlier this month.

  • April 24, 2019

    Disney Uncaged From 'Zootopia' Copyright Fight At 9th Circ.

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday declined to revive a copyright lawsuit accusing The Walt Disney Co. of ripping off a screenwriter's television pitch to create its animated hit "Zootopia," finding that the two works are not substantially similar.

  • April 24, 2019

    Ex-Texas Coach Admits Bribe From 'Varsity Blues' Mastermind

    The former men's tennis coach at the University of Texas at Austin pled guilty in Boston federal court Wednesday to accepting bribes to pass off a student as a tennis recruit, including taking $60,000 in cash from the man behind the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scheme.

  • April 24, 2019

    Upper Deck Sues Liberty Mutual Over Antitrust Atty Pay

    The Upper Deck Co. sued Liberty Mutual Fire Insurance Co. in California federal court Wednesday, claiming the insurer hasn't followed through on covering Upper Deck in an antitrust lawsuit by rival trading card maker Leaf Trading Cards LLC.

  • April 24, 2019

    Broadband Cos. Ask FCC To Leave Spectrum Leases Alone

    The Federal Communications Commission shouldn't shift the rules surrounding how swaths of the spectrum earmarked for educational use may be leased, several groups who hold such leases have urged the agency.

  • April 24, 2019

    '5GE' Ad Suit Points To Confusion Over New Mobile Tech

    AT&T Inc. and Sprint Corp.’s now-settled case over whether providers should be allowed to brand and market their souped-up but not quite 5G networks as some variation of “5G” shows there is debate over what constitutes true next-generation mobile service.

  • April 24, 2019

    TrueCar, Dealerships Fight Over False Ad Claims

    Car dealers can sue auto-pricing website TrueCar for money it made through allegedly false advertising, even if the dealers can't prove they suffered financial losses themselves, they told a New York federal court on Tuesday.

  • April 24, 2019

    Gizmodo Can't Duck Trump Aide's $100M Defamation Suit

    A Florida federal judge on Wednesday allowed former Donald Trump aide Jason Miller’s $100 million defamation suit against Gizmodo Media Group to proceed, ruling he had plausibly alleged that an article saying he tried to slip an abortion-inducing pill to a woman he’d impregnated was not accurate.

  • April 24, 2019

    Media Firm Fuse Plans Quick Ch. 11 As Contract Row Looms

    Multicultural media company Fuse told a Delaware bankruptcy judge Wednesday it hopes to have the court confirm its prepackaged debt-for-equity Chapter 11 that will wipe away $200 million in debt in early June, but DirecTV said a contract dispute could slow down proceedings.

  • April 24, 2019

    Google Can't Ditch Suit Over 'Free' Drive Storage

    Google LLC can't escape a proposed class action accusing it of misleading "Local Guides" about the free Google Drive storage space they expected to receive, a California federal judge has ruled, finding there is enough evidence alleging that Google did not live up to its promise.

  • April 24, 2019

    Facebook Expects FTC Privacy Fine Of Up To $5B

    Facebook expects to be fined between $3 billion and $5 billion by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission for privacy lapses, in what would dwarf previous penalties the agency has given to technology giants, the company said Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2019

    Macklemore Beats Copyright Suit Over 'Thrift Shop'

    Hip hop duo Macklemore and Ryan Lewis have won a ruling tossing out a lawsuit that claimed they illegally sampled from a New Orleans jazz artist when they created hits like "Thrift Shop."

  • April 24, 2019

    Ex-Mintz Levin Atty Can't Revive NY Post Defamation Suit

    The Second Circuit refused Wednesday to revive the defamation suit of a disbarred Mintz Levin patent attorney against the New York Post after the paper ran a story about his divorce proceedings, including allegations that he abused his wife.

  • April 24, 2019

    Player Images In Fantasy Sports Could Be Next IP Battle

    Fantasy sports and gambling companies won an important victory against college athletes when the Indiana Supreme Court ruled that game statistics are newsworthy and therefore free to use. But the court's silence on a player’s right to his or her own image is likely to set up more legal battles over athletes’ publicity rights as sports betting continues to gain popularity.

  • April 23, 2019

    Three 6 Mafia DJ Hits Travis Scott With $20M Infringement Suit

    A member of the hip-hop group Three 6 Mafia says the hook for modern-day chart topper Travis Scott's song "No Bystanders" is stolen from the group's track "Tear Da Club Up," according to a $20 million infringement suit filed Tuesday in California federal court.

  • April 23, 2019

    4 Things To Know About Facebook's New General Counsel

    The former Davis Polk partner tapped Monday as Facebook’s next general counsel is joining the social media giant amid unprecedented government scrutiny, but a packed resume shows she is no stranger to dealing with international policy and probing questions from lawmakers.

Expert Analysis

  • Rebuttal

    Jury Trials, Though In Decline, Are Well Worth Preserving

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    In a recent Law360 guest article, the author applauded the disappearance of jury trials as an inefficient, costly mechanism, but in doing so he overlooked the greater value of jury trials for our justice system, says Stephen Susman, executive director of the Civil Jury Project at NYU School of Law.

  • A Broader View Of The US Supreme Court Bar

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    During the past 15 years, three widely read articles bolstered by starstruck media have promulgated the incorrect perception — sorely in need of revision — that the U.S. Supreme Court bar is limited to a handful of elite lawyers, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Opinion

    Jury Trials Are In Decline For Good Reason

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    A recent Law360 article reported on federal judges bemoaning jury trials' nationwide decline, but these laments are unfounded as jury trials have been replaced by better alternatives, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research.

  • What To Expect 1 Year After DOL's Updated Internship Test

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    As companies begin to usher in summer interns, it's not extremely clear how courts will apply the U.S. Department of Labor's seven-part test for classifying internships as paid or unpaid, which was introduced just over one year ago and has not yet been addressed in a major lawsuit, says Elizabeth Vulaj of Segal McCambridge.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Circuitous Path To The Law

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    Instead of going to college after high school, I followed in my father’s footsteps and became an electrician. Later I became an electrical engineer, and then an IP attorney. Every twist and turn along the way has made me a better lawyer, says Joseph Maraia of Burns & Levinson.

  • A Major Shift For EU Copyright Protection Online

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    A recently adopted European copyright directive contains two controversial changes that are likely to alter the internet status quo by holding online content-sharing service providers liable for users' copyright violations, say Andrew Avsec and Tracey Starck of Brinks Gilson.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Conrad Reviews 'The Jury Crisis'

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    In "The Jury Crisis," jury consultant and social psychologist Drury Sherrod spotlights the vanishing jury trial, providing a fascinating canary-in-the-coal-mine warning for lawyers, litigants and society at large, says U.S. District Judge Robert Conrad of the Western District of North Carolina.

  • Revamping Your Approach To Client Development

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    As a former general counsel for both public and private companies, my advice to law firm attorneys who want to attract and keep clients is simple — provide certain legal services for free, says Noel Elfant, founder of General Counsel Practice.

  • HUD's Facebook Case Raises New Fair Housing Act Questions

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    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development recently filed a complaint against Facebook for discriminatory housing practices in the company's advertising platform, providing an interesting test case about how the Fair Housing Act applies in the social media context, says Kristen Sinisi of Bernabei & Kabat.

  • SEC Has Been Busy In FY 2019

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    Despite enduring the long government shutdown, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s Division of Enforcement filed more cases in the first six months of this fiscal year than in the same period last year, suggesting enforcement activity will remain vigorous throughout 2019, say attorneys at Covington & Burling.