Media & Entertainment

  • November 08, 2019

    Venable Partner's Forgery Claim 'Unprofessional,' Judge Says

    A California judge hammered a Venable LLP partner Friday for filing a motion alleging opposing counsel in the sexual battery case against billionaire Alki David forged her signature on a court document, calling the move "incendiary and unprofessional" when a simple phone call could have cleared up the matter.

  • November 08, 2019

    Facebook Enters Uncharted Legal Waters With Spyware Suit

    Facebook's new suit accusing an Israeli spyware company of compromising the phones of WhatsApp users includes a novel argument under federal anti-hacking law and presents a new wrinkle in the debate over government access to encrypted messages.

  • November 08, 2019

    Roger Stone Atty, Key Witness Clash Over WikiLeaks Contacts

    A star witness in Roger Stone's criminal trial lashed out at an attorney for the former Trump campaign adviser over the assertion that he misled Stone into believing he had personal connections with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, whose group released emails stolen from the Democratic National Committee's computer system.

  • November 08, 2019

    Netflix, News Outlets Hit With 2nd 'Wild Wild Country' Suit

    The controversial religious group that was the subject of Netflix’s “Wild Wild Country” hit the acclaimed documentary’s makers with a second copyright infringement suit Thursday, slamming the series as “little more than a repackaging of content purloined from other authors and filmmakers.”

  • November 08, 2019

    Netflix Shakes Journalist's Copyright Suit Over 'Narcos' Series

    A Florida federal judge has thrown out a copyright suit against the makers of the Netflix series “Narcos” by a well-known Colombian journalist who claimed the show ripped off scenes from her memoir involving her romantic relationship with Pablo Escobar, ruling that historical facts cannot be copyrighted.

  • November 08, 2019

    Trump Rape Accuser: Secret Service Blocked Process Servers

    A columnist who has accused President Donald Trump of raping her in a dressing room 23 years ago claimed on Friday that her attempts to serve the president with New York state court papers have been rebuffed by the U.S. Secret Service.

  • November 08, 2019

    Fed. Circ. Affirms Dish's PTAB Win After Remand Bid Fails

    The Federal Circuit on Friday upheld a Patent Trial and Appeal Board decision invalidating claims in a Customedia patent on digital management systems, days after refusing the company’s bid for a new PTAB review in light of the board’s structure being found unconstitutional.

  • November 08, 2019

    PTAB Lets Emmy-Winning Audio IP Owner Amend All Claims

    The owner of an Emmy-winning invention relating to audio technology can amend all claims in an audio recording patent that were invalidated by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board after the board found that the award shows the new claims are not obvious.

  • November 08, 2019

    The Weeknd Can't Trim Songwriters' Suit Over 'A Lonely Night'

    A California federal judge shot down an attempt by The Weeknd to trim a suit accusing the Canadian R&B artist of ripping off a song by a trio of British songwriters to make his track "A Lonely Night," which appeared on his Grammy Award-winning 2016 album "Starboy."

  • November 08, 2019

    Brand Battles: Frito-Lay Fights Vice Media Over 'Munchies'

    In Law360's latest roundup of new actions at the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, Frito-Lay and Vice Media fight over their dueling "Munchies" brands, the owners of the Empire State Building move to shut down logos featuring the iconic tower, and the NCAA aims to bust a "Bracket."

  • November 08, 2019

    Top 4 Groups Lobbying The FCC

    During the month of October, lobbyists representing major telecom providers squared off over the best ways to repurpose satellite spectrum in the valuable C-Band and how to fund and manage FCC subsidy programs.

  • November 08, 2019

    House Dems Seek Update On FCC Location-Tracking Probe

    The Federal Communications Commission is facing pressure from House Democrats to release the results of its investigation into wireless carriers that sell data that third parties use to track cell phone users.

  • November 08, 2019

    SEC Says Christian Music Co. Lied To Investors To Raise $3M

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission asked a Maine federal judge on Friday to grant it a win in its suit accusing a Christian concert promoter of raising $3 million by lying to investors about where their money was going.

  • November 08, 2019

    Chinese Startups, US Biotechs Price IPOs Raising $121M

    Two Chinese startups, a U.S. medical device company and a brain-cancer focused biotechnology company raised a combined $121 million in initial public offerings that began trading Friday, as what had been an underwhelming week at the public market came to a close.

  • November 08, 2019

    FCC Finds Sinclair-Linked Stations Bungled AT&T Deal Talks

    Twenty stations tied to Sinclair Broadcast Group failed to work with AT&T to retain and restore local broadcast programming on satellite and internet platforms, the Federal Communications Commission said Friday, calling the infraction "the most egregious example of delay that we have encountered."

  • November 08, 2019

    High Court Will Hear Booking.com Trademark Battle

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday sided with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and agreed to hear a case over whether Booking.com's name is too generic for trademark protection.

  • November 08, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week has seen Maersk's Hong Kong unit sue AXA, Allianz and other insurers over cargo claims, the resurfacing of commercial fraud claims filed against a defunct sports rights agency and Allianz Global Investors drag RSA Insurance into court over a financial markets dispute. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • November 07, 2019

    Dershowitz Fights Defamation Suit With Claims Of His Own

    Alan Dershowitz on Thursday denied the allegations of a woman who says he defamed her by calling her a liar after she accused him of sexually molesting her as a child, and the former Harvard law professor has fired back by saying his accuser is the one who broke the law.

  • November 07, 2019

    DOJ Points To Records Stone Told Congress He Never Had

    Federal prosecutors doubled down Thursday on their characterization of Roger Stone as a liar, pointing to a stream of emails and text messages between the former Trump adviser, top campaign aides and associates of Stone about his anticipation of the release of more hacked emails ahead of the 2016 presidential election to damage Hillary Clinton's candidacy.

  • November 07, 2019

    Arpaio Hits HuffPost, Rolling Stone With New Defamation Suit

    Former Maricopa County, Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio launched a fresh defamation suit on Thursday seeking more than $300 million in damages from HuffPost, Rolling Stone and journalists at both publications after recently losing a similar case in the same Washington, D.C., federal court.

  • November 07, 2019

    ​​​​​​​NYT Loses Bid For 2nd Circ. To Rethink Palin Libel Ruling

    The full Second Circuit declined Thursday to reconsider a panel's August decision allowing Sarah Palin to sue The New York Times for alleged defamation, shooting down a request from the paper, which warned that the ruling would weaken "bedrock First Amendment protections."

  • November 07, 2019

    NY Data Security Law To Make State A More Active Enforcer

    A recent New York law that sets a high bar for companies to improve their data security measures is likely to expose a broad range of businesses to increased enforcement by the state's already-aggressive attorney general, while adding to a complicated patchwork of state-by-state privacy laws. 

  • November 07, 2019

    Convicted Ex-Willkie Atty In 'Varsity Blues' Scam Suspended

    Former Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP co-chair Gordon R. Caplan's legal license was temporarily suspended Thursday by a New York state appellate court after he pled guilty to charges related to the "Varsity Blues" college admissions scandal.

  • November 07, 2019

    Hollywood Agents Fight Guild's Bid To Duck Antitrust Suit

    Hollywood talent agencies urged a California federal court Wednesday not to toss their allegations that the union representing film and television writers is orchestrating an illegal boycott, arguing that the activity goes far beyond any labor exemptions to antitrust law.

  • November 07, 2019

    NFL, MLB, NHL Players Sue Pittsburgh Over Athletes Fee

    Pittsburgh’s fee on nonresident professional athletes who play in Pittsburgh is more like a tax and therefore unconstitutional, according to a suit brought against the city by athletes and players associations for the NFL, NHL and MLB.

Expert Analysis

  • What NCAA Publicity Rights Guidance Means For Athletes

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    Following the recent release of NCAA student-athlete compensation guidelines, it remains unclear how disparate governing bodies will choose to set rules, leaving student-athletes seeking to commercialize their names, images or likenesses through contracts or trademark rights with a confusing mix of incentives and prohibitions, says Radhika Raman of Knobbe Martens.

  • How Fed. Circ. May Defer To PTAB In Facebook Case

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    The appeal of six inter partes reviews in Facebook v. Windy City presents an opportunity for the Federal Circuit to provide clarity on the appropriate level of deference to be afforded holdings of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board's precedent-setting panel, and it may even provide a chance for the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • AI Bill Emphasizes Transparency And Consumer Control

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    The Filter Bubble Transparency Act introduced in the Senate last month is the latest of growing congressional efforts to regulate artificial intelligence, and the first substantive federal bill aimed at curbing companies' algorithmic control of content on internet platforms, say Adam Aft and Yoon Chae of Baker McKenzie.

  • 2 FTC Cases Take A Stand Against Online Endorsement Fraud

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    Businesses involved in e-commerce should take careful note of the Federal Trade Commission's recent cases against Sunday Riley Modern Skincare and Devumi, because until now consumer protection agencies have struggled to govern fake reviews and false indicators of brand value online, says Brad Elbein at Culhane Meadows.

  • Where A Litigator's Advice Can Improve Agreement Drafting

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    Transactional attorneys should consider consulting with litigation counsel when drafting certain contractual provisions — choice of law, choice of forum, attorney fees and others — that could come into play in a broad range of substantive disputes, says Adrienne Koch at Katsky Korins.

  • Opinion

    Flat-Fee Legal Billing Can Liberate Attorneys

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    Replacing hourly billing with flat-fee arrangements, especially for appellate work, will leave attorneys feeling free to spend as much time as necessary to produce their highest quality work, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Spoliation Rule Remains Ambiguous Despite Amendments

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    Although the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure were amended to provide a uniform standard of culpability for spoliation, cases with similar facts are still reaching differing results because the rule does not specify how a court should evaluate a party's intent, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton.

  • Taxation Of Student-Athletes: Untangling Law And Policy

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    In reaction to California’s new law allowing student-athletes to accept paid endorsements, a U.S. senator is introducing legislation to tax athletic scholarships. The ensuing discussion shows that the current tax treatment of scholarships is not well understood, says professor Samuel Brunson of Loyola University Chicago School of Law.

  • Opinion

    To Abate Corruption, IAAF Must Change More Than Its Name

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    The remedy for some very serious, and even criminal, problems currently plaguing the International Association of Athletics Federations — soon to be known as World Athletics — is nothing less than a total change in culture and leadership, says Ronald Katz at GCA Law.

  • A Plan For When AI Users' Works Infringe Human Works

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    To address the question of what happens when a user of an artificial intelligence program creates a work that infringes on a copyrighted work, a new legal code to govern AI works should increase accountability and make enforcement efforts easier to pursue and adjudicate, says Jonathan Purow of Gottlieb Rackman.

  • SEC's Fraud Enforcement Shows Quality, If Not Quantity

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    Over the course of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recently ended fiscal year, the regulator's Division of Enforcement fulfilled its promise to emphasize quality over quantity in cases alleging misrepresentations of financial performance by covering a wide swath of accounting, disclosure, internal control and auditor independence issues, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • EU 'Monopoly' Case Could Be Game Changer For TM Owners

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    A recent decision from the EU Intellectual Property Office Board of Appeal involving Hasbro's Monopoly game suggests that applying to invalidate a trademark on the ground of bad faith is an advantageous route to prevent brand owners from attempting to use refiling tactics to game the EU trademark system, says Paul Sweeden of Locke Lord.

  • 5 Trends Influencing RFPs For Law Firms

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    Requests for proposals, the standard tool of companies evaluating law firms, are becoming better suited to the legal industry, says Matthew Prinn of RFP Advisory Group.

  • Ill. High Court Ruling Shows 3 Trends In Tech Crime Litigation

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent decision in Illinois v. Austin, in favor of protecting state citizens’ privacy rights, may shed light on how crime fueled by technology, such as the distribution of so-called revenge porn, will be addressed and litigated in the near future, says Mark Sableman of Thompson Coburn.

  • NPE Cases May Be Contrary To ITC's Mission

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    Recent cases at the U.S. International Trade Commission, involving the nonpracticing entities Neodron's and Data Scape's seeming attempts to force companies to pay higher patent fees and ban imports, suggest that the ITC may be straying from its core purpose of protecting domestic industries and consumers, says Derek Dahlgren of Rothwell Figg.