Media & Entertainment

  • August 10, 2020

    Ex-Bloomberg Reporter Slams Newsroom As Sexist, Racist

    A former news reporter for Bloomberg LP tore into the news organization Sunday for its allegedly sexist and racist culture, claiming in a proposed class action lodged in New York state court that she was denied advancement opportunities and exploited as a "diversity pawn" for its business and journalistic gain.

  • August 10, 2020

    MGM Units, Vegas Unions End COVID-19 Dispute

    Las Vegas casino unions and MGM Resorts announced on Monday that they have resolved a dispute centering on allegations that the resorts' "unreasonable" COVID-19 rules didn't protect employees.

  • August 10, 2020

    Roku's Trial Delay Request OK'd By 'Surprised' Texas Judge

    U.S. District Judge Alan D. Albright on Monday again delayed a patent jury trial involving Roku because of the coronavirus pandemic, noting his surprise this time that Roku's attorneys had asked for the case to start in October because of persistent safety concerns.

  • August 10, 2020

    AMC Takes 'Mickey' Singer By The Hand And Settles Suit

    Singer and choreographer Toni Basil told a California federal judge Monday that she reached an agreement with AMC over the cable channel's alleged "willful, intentional and purposeful use and exploitation" of her No. 1 hit song "Mickey" in a promo trailer for the series "Preacher."

  • August 10, 2020

    EU, US In Talks To Replace Axed Privacy Shield Data Pact

    The U.S. Department of Commerce and the European Commission revealed Monday that they're negotiating an "enhanced" Privacy Shield data transfer agreement to replace a version of the popular pact invalidated by the European Court of Justice last month. 

  • August 10, 2020

    Confusion Prevails Over Extent Of Trump's TikTok 'Ban'

    President Donald Trump's efforts to "ban" TikTok using legal tools that aren't usually aimed at popular mobile apps have left attorneys confused about how exactly the social media platform will be targeted as U.S.-China relations continue to fray.

  • August 10, 2020

    Italy OKs 2 Extra Years To Repay Pandemic-Suspended Taxes

    Italy is allowing tax payments that were suspended during the country's COVID-19 lockdown this spring to be repaid by the end of 2022 rather than by year's end, according to a government decree.

  • August 10, 2020

    FCC Says Times Are A-Changin' As It Dumps Radio Dupe Rule

    The Federal Communications Commission has officially killed the so-called radio duplication rule, which for more than 50 years has banned local radio stations that share an owner from airing a certain amount of overlapping content.

  • August 10, 2020

    Google Slams Parents' Suit Over 'Loot Boxes' In Games

    Google on Friday urged a California federal court to throw out a suit brought by parents claiming its Google Play store encourages children to gamble via surprise in-game purchases called "loot boxes," arguing that it's immune from the claims because Google isn't the one behind the games or the loot boxes.

  • August 10, 2020

    Google Asks 11th Circ. To Uphold Win In Pulse Shooting Suit

    Google urged the Eleventh Circuit on Monday to affirm the company's win in a suit blaming Facebook, Twitter and YouTube for radicalizing the man who carried out the 2016 mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Florida, saying a "virtually identical" suit was tossed by the Sixth Circuit.

  • August 10, 2020

    FCC Urged To Extend Low-Income COVID-19 Benefits

    An array of organizations advocating for civil, anti-poverty, consumer, labor and technology rights sent a letter Monday to the Federal Communications Commission urging the agency to further assist low-income consumers with staying connected as the coronavirus pandemic lingers.

  • August 10, 2020

    Settling Eventbrite Investors Say Virus Hurts Recovery Odds

    Eventbrite investors told a California federal judge they reached a $1.9 million settlement deal with the digital event management company, saying it seemed prudent to end their securities fraud suit amid a pandemic that makes large-scale, in-person events dangerous to hold.

  • August 10, 2020

    White House Announces Next Midband Spectrum Auction

    The Trump administration plans to auction off a fresh swath of valuable mid-band spectrum for commercial 5G services, the White House said Monday, after the U.S. military hammered out a public-private sharing regime.

  • August 10, 2020

    Chinese Gaming Cos. May Merge Amid US-China Tension

    China's Tencent on Monday detailed plans to further grow its stake in Huya through an $810 million deal as it weighs merging the U.S.-listed company with fellow gaming-focused streaming platform Douyu, a move that comes amid heightened tensions between the U.S. and China.

  • August 10, 2020

    15 Minutes With Dreamscape Immersive's Chief Legal Officer

    The pandemic has pushed virtual-reality company Dreamscape Immersive's Chief Legal Officer Tammy Brandt to do what she does best: Help emerging businesses pivot to achieve success. Here, she shares more about the company's shift and the accompanying legal challenges.

  • August 10, 2020

    Fla. Panel Revises Disney Tax Ruling To OK Valuation Method

    A property valuation method a Florida appeals court previously held as illegal in a Disney property tax dispute does not violate state law, the appellate court said in a revised opinion.

  • August 07, 2020

    9th Circ. Won't Pause Facebook Wiretap Order For High Court

    Facebook can't pause a Ninth Circuit decision reviving claims that it unlawfully intercepted logged-out users' browsing histories while the social media giant appeals the issue to the U.S. Supreme Court, the federal appellate court ruled Friday.

  • August 07, 2020

    Music Rights Group's Portfolio Undesirable, Google Says

    Streaming giants Apple, Amazon, Google and Spotify on Friday denied waging a group boycott against a music rights organization run by a 21-year-old self-described "musical prodigy," telling a Connecticut federal court there's no antitrust case because no one wants its music.

  • August 07, 2020

    Snowden Hit With Discovery Sanction Over Tell-All Book

    Former U.S. intelligence contractor Edward Snowden was sanctioned in Virginia federal court on Friday for his deliberate "wholesale refusal to respond to discovery" related to his memoir released in September, which the court said contained classified information.

  • August 07, 2020

    COVID-19 IP Catch-Up: Remdesivir Drama & Jury Trial Regret

    In this round of intellectual property updates tied to the ongoing pandemic, attorneys general put pressure on the federal government to make COVID-19 drugs more accessible, patent trials in Texas remain in the air, and one attorney expresses guilt for proceeding with an in-person jury trial.

  • August 07, 2020

    Broadband Scarcity Looms Over Virtual School Year

    As school districts hammer out plans to hold fall classes partially or fully online, educators and regulators are scrambling to get as many students connected to the internet as possible, highlighting the ongoing connectivity divide that threatens to further disadvantage low-income and rural learners.

  • August 07, 2020

    Ex-NFL Players' Painkiller Suit Revived By 9th Circ.

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday revived a suit by former National Football League players alleging the league made them take opioids and other painkillers to get back on the field before they were healthy.

  • August 07, 2020

    Rudy Giuliani Sued Over $15K Art Bill Linked To Divorce

    An art adviser sued Rudy Giuliani in New York state court Friday for allegedly refusing to pay over $15,000 rung up when the adviser appraised art owned by the former New York City mayor and his now-ex-wife Judith for purposes of divvying up their property.

  • August 07, 2020

    11th Circ. To Rehear Epstein Victims' Lawsuit

    The 11th Circuit on Friday vacated an April panel decision and said it will rehear en banc a petition from an alleged victim of Jeffrey Epstein that argues a non-prosecution agreement between the billionaire sex offender and federal prosecutors violated her rights under the Crime Victims' Rights Act.

  • August 07, 2020

    Harvard Prof Sues New York Magazine Over Unflattering Piece

    A Harvard law professor who was the subject of a New York magazine story calling him "the most gullible man in Cambridge" has alleged the magazine's reporter deliberately twisted the facts to portray him as the victim of two extortionists and sexually harassed him during the process of reporting.

Expert Analysis

  • Copyright Law Issues Plague Sherlock Holmes Suit

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    The Arthur Conan Doyle estate's recent lawsuit in a New Mexico federal court against Netflix over a Sherlock Holmes movie faces significant challenges to its copyright infringement argument, including a Seventh Circuit ruling that Sherlock Holmes characters who appeared in public domain and copyright-protected stories can exist in different forms, says Stephen Lee at Benesch Friedlander.

  • Opinion

    ADA Protects Lawyers With Disabilities, But We Must Do More

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    As an attorney with cerebral palsy, Danielle Liebl at Reed Smith says that while the 30-year-old Americans with Disabilities Act has protected her against discrimination, the legal industry must do more to accommodate lawyers with disabilities and make them more comfortable in self-identifying.

  • Perspectives

    Legal Deserts Threaten Justice In Rural America

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    Many small towns and rural counties have few lawyers or none at all, which threatens the notion of justice for all Americans and demands creative solutions from legislators, bar associations and law schools, says Patricia Refo, president of the American Bar Association.

  • Unusual TikTok Review Calls CFIUS Processes Into Question

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    The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States has departed from established processes in its national security investigation of TikTok, with comments from across the Trump administration casting doubt on the interagency committee's confidentiality, apolitical nature and focus, says Paul Marquardt at Cleary.

  • CFAA Decision May Raise Bar On Scraping Liability

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    A D.C. federal court recently held in Sandvig v. Barr that the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act does not prohibit scraping publicly accessible portions of a website, even when doing so violates the website's terms of service, which is similar to the Ninth Circuit's 2019 hiQ v. LinkedIn decision and may influence scraping law in the coming years, say attorneys at ​​​​Perkins Coie.

  • Analyzing Upward And Downward Trends In Legal Tech

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    Advances in legal technology are often accompanied by bombastic overstatements, but it is important to separate the wheat from the chaff by looking at where various technologies stand on the hype curve, says Lance Eliot at Stanford Law School.

  • Opinion

    ABA's New Guidance On Litigation Funding Misses The Mark

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    The American Bar Association should revise its recently approved best practices on third-party litigation funding as they do not reflect how legal finance actually works and could create confusion among lawyers, says Andrew Cohen at Burford Capital.

  • 3 Cases Spotlight Shareholder Interest In Public Co. Diversity

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    Recent derivative claims filed in a California federal court over diversity and inclusion shortcomings at Oracle, Facebook and Qualcomm demonstrate shareholder willingness to hold directors and officers accountable for public companies' failure to deliver on environmental, social and governance commitments, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • What Firms Should Ask Before Hiring Attorneys From Gov't

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    In the final year of any presidential administration, there is an undeniable appetite on the part of large law firms for government-savvy legal talent, but firms need to first consider how they will actually utilize their new star hire, says Michael Ellenhorn at Decipher.

  • The Ethics Of Using Chatbots For Legal Services

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    Delegating legal work to robots involves several risks, including running afoul of statutes dictating unauthorized practice of law, but with the right precautions, law firms can lawfully employ artificially intelligent chatbots that can imitate human conversations, say attorneys at Haynes and Boone.

  • Market Rebound May Curb Securities Class Actions, Damages

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    The stock market's dramatic recovery from its pandemic-prompted plunge may provide securities class action defendants an opportunity to rely on the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act’s rarely invoked bounce-back provision to ward off stock-drop claims, or sharply limit available damages, say John Schreiber and John Tschirgi at Winston & Strawn.

  • Houston Rockets' Virus Coverage Claims Face Key Hurdles

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    The NBA's Houston Rockets' recent insurance coverage claims for interruption losses due to COVID-19 may not survive summary judgment or trial because of clearly worded policy requirements and the absence of direct physical damage, say Glenn Jacobson and Mark Binsky at Abrams Gorelick.

  • Opinion

    ABA Must Seize Opportunity To Respond To Bar Exam Chaos

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    The challenges of administering bar exams this year have put the future of the profession in jeopardy, but the American Bar Association at its ongoing annual meeting can adopt a resolution that would urge jurisdictions to take emergency actions with respect to licensure of new attorneys, says Nicholas Allard, former president of Brooklyn Law School.

  • How Pandemic Is Affecting The Pace Of Judicial Opinions

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    The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way judges work, but how has it impacted the volume of work product they generate? Ben Strawn and Omeed Azmoudeh at Davis Graham investigate using data from the PACER federal courts registry.

  • High Court TCPA Case May Curb Robocall Class Actions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently granted certiorari in a Telephone Consumer Protection Act case, Facebook v. Duguid, that has the potential to transform the statutory definition of autodialer and make it much more difficult for plaintiffs to prevail in robocall cases, says David Poell at Sheppard Mullin.

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