Media & Entertainment

  • March 05, 2021

    Apple Beats ITunes Gift Card Scam Assistance Suit, For Now

    A California federal judge Thursday tossed a lawsuit alleging Apple doesn't try to combat thieves who trick people into making payments with iTunes gift cards because the tech giant gets to keep a chunk of the scammed proceeds, saying the complaint doesn't show that Apple substantially helps the thieves.

  • March 05, 2021

    Nashville Club Can't Get Food-Contamination Virus Coverage

    A Tennessee federal judge has rejected famed nightclub and restaurant Nashville Underground's bid for insurance coverage of losses due to the COVID-19 pandemic, ruling that it can't claim "food contamination" from the virus because the venue hasn't pointed to any foodborne illness outbreaks.

  • March 05, 2021

    Taxation With Representation: Latham, Skadden, Sullivan

    In this week's Taxation With Representation, cloud company Okta buys identity authentication company Auth0 for $6.5 billion, Las Vegas Sands sells property holdings for $6.3 billion, and insurance technology company Hippo inks a $5 billion merger.

  • March 05, 2021

    'Magic' Over As Hasbro Beats Suit Over Limited Edition Packs

    Hasbro Inc. has triumphed over a proposed class action brought by Magic: The Gathering players who had their eBay orders for a limited edition card pack canceled, with a Georgia federal judge saying the plaintiffs cited no new evidence in their bid to undo her dismissal of the suit.

  • March 05, 2021

    Tabloid Loses Bid To Appeal Meghan Markle Privacy Win

    A London judge on Friday rejected a tabloid's request to challenge his ruling that the Daily Mail publisher had violated Meghan Markle's privacy by running extracts of a letter she wrote, saying he saw no prospect of success with an appeal.

  • March 04, 2021

    Hagens Berman Atty Admonished For 'Reckless' Apple Slip

    A California federal magistrate judge admonished a Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro LLP attorney Thursday who revealed information about commission rates that Netflix and HBO apparently pay to Apple that he learned through Apple's discovery documents, but declined to sanction the attorney.

  • March 04, 2021

    2nd Circ. Affirms Denial Of PPP Loan For NY Strip Club

    The Second Circuit on Thursday affirmed a New York federal court's denial of a Buffalo-area gentlemen's club's application for Paycheck Protection Program funding due to a provision that does not guarantee aid for "live performances of a prurient sexual nature."

  • March 04, 2021

    Amazon Says Parler Is 'Forum Shopping' Contract Breach Suit

    After suffering a defeat in its antitrust suit against Amazon in Seattle federal court and dropping the case, Parler filed a new breach of contract suit in state court in an "extreme attempt to forum shop," the tech giant said Wednesday as it removed the case to federal court.

  • March 04, 2021

    Roc Nation Scores $12M Win In Maroon 5 Coverage Row

    A New York federal judge on Thursday awarded Jay-Z's entertainment company Roc Nation $12.5 million against HCC International Insurance Co. in a coverage dispute over the death of Maroon 5's manager, Jordan Feldstein, finding that the insurer wrongly calculated the coverage limit.

  • March 04, 2021

    US Trustee Says Alpha Media Ch. 11 Plan Too Rushed

    The Office of the U.S. Trustee objected Thursday to the proposed Chapter 11 disclosure statement of radio station owner Alpha Media Holdings, telling a Virginia bankruptcy court that the plan doesn't provide enough time for parties to file objections.

  • March 04, 2021

    3 Firms Guide Square's $297M Investment In Jay-Z's TIDAL

    Financial technology company Square said Thursday it will take a majority stake in TIDAL, a music and entertainment company that counts artist Jay-Z among its directors, in a $297 million deal guided by Gibson Dunn, Reed Smith and Cummings & Lockwood.

  • March 04, 2021

    Comcast Asks Justices For 2nd Try At Voice Tech Patent Fight

    Comcast wants the Supreme Court to settle the question of whether administrative patent judges were constitutionally appointed, hoping that a ruling that they weren't would give the cable company another shot at invalidating patents covering TV voice recognition technology.

  • March 04, 2021

    Soul Singer Wails At 9th Circ. Over Royalties Cert. Denial

    1970s soul singer Lenny Williams sang a sad song to the Ninth Circuit Thursday, saying his class certification bid alleging that thousands of Warner Music artists were underpaid millions of dollars in royalties was wrongly denied because Warner was given too much power in discovery and allowed to handpick 100 contracts to share.

  • March 04, 2021

    Alamo Drafthouse Gets OK To Tap $7M In DIP Funds

    Bankrupt movie theater chain Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas on Thursday got permission from a Delaware bankruptcy court judge to tap into the first $7 million of its Chapter 11 financing as it starts on the road to an asset sale it plans to close in May.

  • March 04, 2021

    Authorities Can Calculate Unreported VAT, ECJ Adviser Says

    European tax authorities can calculate the amount of value-added tax for unreported transactions, but taxpayers must be allowed to provide evidence showing they collected the tax, an adviser to Europe's top court said Thursday.

  • March 04, 2021

    Gov't Extends £500M Film Pandemic Insurance Scheme

    The British government has extended to the end of the year a £500 million ($700 million) support program for TV and film productions that cannot buy COVID-19 cover from the commercial insurance market.

  • March 03, 2021

    Reps. OK Voting Bill With High Court Ethics, Donor Disclosure

    The U.S. Supreme Court would have to adopt a binding ethics code and political advocacy groups would have to disclose their donors under a sweeping Democratic proposal on voting, campaign finance, lobbying and ethics that passed the House on Wednesday without any Republican support.

  • March 03, 2021

    Kaepernick's ESG-Focused Blank-Check Biz Raises $300M

    A blank-check company sponsored by former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick started trading Wednesday after raising $300 million in an Ellenoff Grossman-led initial public offering.

  • March 03, 2021

    Tech Exec Says Hyperlink Rebooted Defamation Suit

    Attorneys for a tech entrepreneur told Delaware Supreme Court justices in a closely watched case Wednesday that disputed wording in an online story that hyperlinked to an allegedly defamatory earlier article should be sufficient to overcome a lower court's statute of limitations dismissal.

  • March 03, 2021

    Valve Wants $4M Patent Verdict Wiped After Zoom Jury Trial

    After the first-ever Zoom patent jury trial resulted in a $4 million verdict against Valve Corp., the video game maker is seeking to throw out the verdict on the grounds that "the evidence presented at trial points to only one reasonable conclusion" — that it didn't infringe.

  • March 03, 2021

    Mariah Carey's Brother Says Singer Defamed Him In Memoir

    Mariah Carey's brother sued the pop singer, her co-author, Macmillan Publishing Group and TV talk show host Andy Cohen in New York state court Wednesday, accusing them of defaming him in the recently released best-selling memoir "The Meaning of Mariah Carey."

  • March 03, 2021

    NLRB Judge Says Theater Illegally Banned 'Zealous' Steward

    A California theater banned a stage crew worker to rid itself of a "frequent, open and zealous" advocate for his colleagues, not because it feared his zeal would lead to a hostile work environment lawsuit, a National Labor Relations Board judge said. 

  • March 03, 2021

    Chicks' Tour Co. Sues Lloyd's For $7M Over Canceled Shows

    Lloyd's underwriters are on the hook to the tune of $6.6 million over the Chicks' canceled tour of their "Gaslighter" album, the band's touring company argued Wednesday in California state court, claiming there isn't any way for concert venues to reopen in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

  • March 03, 2021

    Jenner & Block Taps Ex-FCC Pro As New Tech Practice Head

    Jenner & Block LLP has a new leader in its communications, internet and technology practice, and she comes into the role with more than a decade of experience working her way through the ranks at the Federal Communications Commission.

  • March 03, 2021

    Feds Say 'Tiger King' Animal Welfare Act Claim Is Valid

    The U.S. government has urged an Oklahoma federal judge to preserve an Animal Welfare Act claim in its suit against the zoo featured in Netflix's hit series "Tiger King," saying the zoo owner is violating the AWA by exhibiting animals without a valid license.

Expert Analysis

  • Ethics Tips For Attorneys Telecommuting Across State Lines

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    Attorneys working remotely from jurisdictions in which they are not admitted should take precautionary steps to avoid engaging in unauthorized practice of law, say John Schmidt and Michael Seaman at Phillips Lytle.

  • 6 Ways Legal Employers Can Help Pandemic-Weary Parents

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    Parenting during the pandemic has introduced a series of competing personal and professional obligations for attorneys and professional staff, and even organizations that are supportive of their parent employees can take steps to do better, says Meredith Kahan at Saul Ewing.

  • Controversial Md. Digital Ad Tax Leaves Sourcing Undefined

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    Sending shockwaves through the industry and prompting a lawsuit, Maryland's recently enacted, first-of-its-kind digital advertising gross revenues tax also contains a significant ambiguity as to how revenue from digital ad services should be sourced, say Stefi George and David Blum at Akerman.

  • Remote Working Tips For Lawyer Trainees And Their Firms

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    The prospect of joining a law firm during the pandemic can cause added pressure, but with a few good practices — and a little help from their firms and supervising attorneys — lawyer trainees can get ahead of the curve while working remotely, say William Morris and Ted Landray at King & Spalding.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Could Limit Copyright Statutory Damages

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    After the recent Desire v. Manna Textiles decision tossing a statutory damages verdict in the Ninth Circuit, copyright plaintiffs there may no longer be able to multiply the number of available statutory damage awards per work based on the number of downstream infringers, says Matthew Gershman at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Too Wealthy To Bail: Navigating Pretrial Release Strategy

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    Recent noteworthy bail decisions, including a New York federal court's denial of Ghislaine Maxwell's $28.5 million bail package offer, reveal that high-net-worth defendants should demonstrate significant ties to the U.S. and provide comprehensive financial disclosures to mitigate flight-risk objections, say Sean Buckley and Amanda Tuminelli at Kobre & Kim.

  • What Biden's Ethics Pledge Means For Gov't Revolving Door

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    Attorneys at Nossaman look at how President Joe Biden’s ethics pledge goes beyond those of his predecessors by imposing post-employment shadow lobbying and golden parachute restrictions on his administration’s appointees — and how a House bill proposing expansion of federal ethics law could affect enforcement.

  • Opinion

    USPTO Should Rethink Its Resistance To Political Slogan TMs

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    Considering the registrability of the Jan. 6 rallying cry "Stop the Steal" as a trademark, John Halski at Perkins Coie finds that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office should adopt an approach that more clearly acknowledges that political slogans may function as trademarks in certain situations and that clearly identifies reasons for refusal.

  • Opinion

    Punishing Bar Exam Policies On Menstrual Products Must Go

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    Law graduates across the states are sitting for the grueling two-day bar exam this week despite menstruation-related barriers, such as inadequate menstrual product and bathroom access, which could be eradicated with simple policy tweaks, say law professors Elizabeth Cooper, Margaret Johnson and Marcy Karin.

  • It's Time For Law Firms To Start Loving And Leveraging Data

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    The volume and diversity of data managed by law firms today — from client files to internal financial records — may seem daunting, but when properly organized, good data can help practitioners stay competitive by providing sharper insight into firm resources and cost of work, say Jaron Luttich and Barry Wiggins at Element Standard.

  • Keys To Protecting Clients During Law Firm Dissolution

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    Whether a law firm dissolution is amicable or adversarial, departing attorneys should take steps to maintain their legal and ethical responsibilities toward clients, and beware client confidentiality pitfalls when joining new firms, say John Schmidt and Colin Fitzgerald at Phillips Lytle.

  • What A New Virginia Privacy Law Could Mean For Businesses

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    As Virginia moves to become the second state to pass a comprehensive data privacy law, businesses that have been building compliance programs for California's new laws will be well positioned to comply with the Virginia law, as long as they note some key differences, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Pandemic Restriction Challenges Face Uphill Battle In Calif.

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    A California appellate court's recent decision in Midway Venture v. San Diego illustrates the steep and narrow path to challenging the state's pandemic-related public health restrictions, even when those restrictions infringe on activities protected by the First Amendment, say Christopher Wheeler and Brookes Degen at Farella Braun.

  • How Case Management Orders Can Support New Attorneys

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    Courts are leading the way in ensuring oral argument opportunities for newer attorneys by incorporating innovative language in a variety of orders, and private parties can and should follow suit by incorporating similar language into case management orders, say Megan Jones and Halli Spraggins at Hausfeld.

  • Courts, FTC May Differ On Sponsored Product Reviews

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in Ariix v. NutriSearch found that a sponsored product review that didn't adequately disclose the reviewer's relationship with the sponsor violated the law — but the Federal Trade Commission would likely have flagged even more problems, says Jeffrey Greenbaum at Frankfurt Kurnit.

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