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Telecommunications

  • February 19, 2019

    Ericsson's Licensing Offer To HTC Is FRAND, Texas Jury Finds

    A Texas federal jury on Friday rejected HTC’s allegation that Ericsson is trying to overcharge on licensing fees for its standard-essential cellular patents, finding that the Swedish telecom giant’s offer to HTC is fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory and that both companies failed to negotiate in good faith.

  • February 19, 2019

    Broadcasters Warn Against Sharing On 6 GHz Band

    The National Association of Broadcasters on Tuesday joined other groups in telling the Federal Communications Commission that it should be cautious about opening up the 6-gigahertz band, which is set aside for broadcast and satellite transmissions, to shared uses by unlicensed devices.

  • February 19, 2019

    FCC's Draft Broadband Report OKs Industry Progress

    The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission circulated a draft report on Tuesday that concludes internet service is being reasonably and quickly rolled out nationwide, and while commissioners must still vote to approve the findings, it's already drawing some criticism.

  • February 19, 2019

    NZ Crafting Digital Tax Measures To Raise Up To $55M

    New Zealand is planning to have a tax designed to capture digital commerce and raise up to NZ$80 million ($55 million), jumping ahead of an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development project to devise recommendations for those issues by 2020.

  • February 19, 2019

    Don't Expand Broadcast Viewer Discount, Group Tells FCC

    Advocacy group Common Cause expressed outrage on Tuesday at suggestions that a break on the Federal Communications Commission’s national audience cap should extend to all TV stations, calling the move a “blatant ... land grab” that would expand rather than diminish a regulatory loophole.

  • February 19, 2019

    US Trade Group Warns Against Europewide 5G Standards

    U.S. wireless trade association CTIA distanced itself from a global trade group's call for a Europewide testing regime on 5G network equipment, arguing that a secure supply chain for next-generation networks is a global issue, and competition would suffer if that chain is governed inconsistently.

  • February 19, 2019

    Ga. Justices Free AT&T Unit From $40M Claim Over 911 Fees

    The Georgia Supreme Court has axed two counties’ push to recoup nearly $40 million in emergency service funds from AT&T Inc. unit BellSouth Telecommunications LLC and other telephone companies that allegedly failed to collect that money from customers, finding the counties don’t have the right to sue for the funds.

  • February 19, 2019

    AT&T Wants Out Of Suit Over Early Retirement Benefits

    AT&T Services Inc.'s pension plan has asked a New York federal court to grant it a quick win in a proposed class action from two former employees who claim they were wrongly denied retroactive early retirement benefits.

  • February 19, 2019

    Justices Deny NY Station's Bid To Review FCC Channel Move

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday denied a petition for writ of certiorari from a New York-area television station that sought review of the D.C. Circuit's support of a Federal Communications Commission decision to assign it a higher broadcast channel as a result of the transition to digital broadcasting.

  • February 15, 2019

    The $1B Question: Can Puerto Rico Afford Its Bankruptcy Bills?

    Law firms and other professional service providers are seeking more than $300 million in bills for Puerto Rico’s unprecedented restructuring — a figure that is eventually expected to surpass $1 billion. Some local attorneys are questioning the costs.

  • February 15, 2019

    Puerto Rico’s Law Firms Find Their Footing After Disaster

    Out of disaster comes opportunity. That is what the corporate legal community of Puerto Rico found after Hurricane Maria. But for many attorneys, the recovery is personal, too.

  • February 15, 2019

    TCPA Challengers Can't Go Around Gov't, High Court Told

    The federal government has jumped into a U.S. Supreme Court fight over the proper channel for challenging the Federal Communications Commission's reading of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, arguing that private litigants aren't allowed to go around the government to launch collateral attacks on the validity of agency orders. 

  • February 15, 2019

    TracFone Sues Texas Cos. In Latest Anti-Trafficking Effort

    Wireless service provider TracFone sued three Texas-based companies Friday, accusing them of running a phone smuggling ring that cuts into its business model, marking the latest salvo in the telecom’s more than decade-long crusade to stop companies from trafficking its tech.

  • February 15, 2019

    Film Studios Say Omniverse Sold Pirated Movies, Shows

    Disney, Paramount Pictures Corp., Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp. and other Hollywood heavyweights have sued Omniverse One World Television in California federal court, accusing the company of selling illegal packages of unlicensed, copyrighted movie and TV shows to streaming services.

  • February 15, 2019

    Sens. Urge FCC To Create Public Portal For Broadband Gaps

    A bipartisan group of senators has asked the Federal Communications Commission to look into creating a portal for the public to submit data detailing gaps in high-speed internet service in order to tackle concerns that national broadband maps are riddled with errors.

  • February 15, 2019

    O'Rielly Praises Muni Broadband Terms Of Service Revamp

    FCC Commissioner Michael O'Rielly praised the city of Chattanooga, Tennessee, on Friday for changing out phrases in its web terms of service that he had previously flagged as potentially limiting free speech online.

  • February 15, 2019

    FCC Urged To Tread Lightly On 6-GHz Unlicensed Use

    The Federal Communications Commission should be cautious about opening up the 6 GHz band, which is set aside for broadcast and satellite transmissions, to shared uses by unlicensed devices, the city of Austin and others told the agency in filings posted Friday.

  • February 15, 2019

    Landowners Seek $900K Fees For Telecom Cable-Line Deal

    A class of landowners poised to recover up to $2 million from Sprint, CenturyLink and other telecoms that allegedly installed cable lines on their properties without permission has requested $900,000 for their attorneys, arguing the award comes out to less than a quarter of the pot after other costs are included.

  • February 15, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The last week has seen the European arm of a Japanese investment bank sue a Saudi billionaire, the former prime minister of Qatar face action involving a pricey mansion and a Swiss bank file claims against executives of a defunct business group being investigated by the U.K.'s fraud watchdog. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • February 15, 2019

    Super 8 Owner’s Cert. Bid Denied In AT&T Junk Fax Suit

    A Connecticut federal judge has rejected a class certification bid in a Super 8 motel owner’s suit over alleged junk faxes from AT&T, saying there’s no viable way to determine whether the proposed class members individually agreed through contracts to receive the faxes.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    The Problem With 'Optimal' Diversity

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    Organizations should seek to avoid discrimination, but they should also be wary of the idea that diverse teams function better than nondiverse teams, because this reasoning lacks evidence and can lead to a slippery slope, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research LLC.

  • 5 Considerations For Both Sides In Stadium Naming Deals

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    The stadium and arena naming rights deal market remains highly active. The complexity of these agreements and the importance of the terms are growing, say Ryan Davis and Steve Smith of Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP.

  • Recent Trends In FTC Consumer Protection Enforcement

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    The Federal Trade Commission is focusing its enforcement efforts on financial services, web services and emerging technologies, data security and consumer privacy, telecommunications, and health care — these five areas represented 88 percent of consumer protection actions in 2017 and 2018, say attorneys with Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP.

  • Fresh Takes On Seeking Costs And Fees Under Rule 45

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    Recent case law reveals that courts vary widely in their approaches to shifting the costs and fees incurred in responding to a Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 45 subpoena. Nonparties responding to such requests should consider certain district court trends, say attorneys at Pepper Hamilton LLP.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Smith Camp Reviews 'Echo Of Its Time'

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    "Echo of Its Time" is the story of Nebraska’s federal district court from statehood in 1867 to the demise of Prohibition in 1933. Professors John Wunder and Mark Scherer have written an objective, unsentimental and insightful history, layered with context and rich in character study, says U.S. District Judge Laurie Smith Camp of the District of Nebraska.

  • A Broad Approach To Opt-Out Texts

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    While businesses cannot fully insulate themselves from Telephone Consumer Protection Act litigation for their texts, five measures will help to facilitate a successful, cost-effective outcome in the event a business is sued for allegedly failing to honor an opt-out request, say attorneys with Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck LLP.

  • The Role Of Data Analytics In Mass Torts

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    Lawyers involved in a mass tort must make difficult decisions concerning the potential size of the claimant pool, the expected percentage of qualifying cases, the likelihood of a settlement and more. Data analytics can help guide mass tort strategies and yield better outcomes, say Deb Zonies and Mark Zabel of litigation support services provider Verus LLC.

  • Opinion

    SEPs Need Injunctions Too

    Many think that injunctions should not be allowed in standard-essential patent cases, but in order to protect the incentive to innovate, all owners of all patents need to be able to exercise their constitutional right to exclude, says Ken Stanwood, chief technology officer at WiLAN Inc.

  • Guest Feature

    'The Mooch' Talks Mayhem, Con Law, Lessons From Harvard

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    Anthony Scaramucci is probably best known for the 11 days he spent as White House director of communications in 2017. But when White and Williams LLP attorney Randy Maniloff sat down to chat with "the Mooch," he was interested in hearing a different story.

  • Now In Congress: State Of The Union, Border Wall, Syria

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    Amid concern that the impasse over a southern border wall might lead to another government shutdown, President Donald Trump's first State of the Union address since the Republican Party lost control of the House of Representatives in the midterm elections offered a blend of bridge-building and confrontation, says Layth Elhassani of Covington & Burling LLP.