Telecommunications

  • June 21, 2021

    10th Circ. Axes Ex-Sprint Investor's Legal Malpractice Suit

    The Tenth Circuit on Monday affirmed that a former Sprint shareholder can't challenge his former attorney's use of their privileged communications, because the investor waived his attorney-client privilege when he included those communications in public court documents.

  • June 21, 2021

    Albertsons Faces TCPA Class Claims Over Texts

    Grocery giant Albertsons Cos. has been hit with a proposed class action in California federal court for allegedly blasting noncustomers with unwanted robotexts in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

  • June 21, 2021

    Congress Eyes Clampdown On 'Stingray' Phone Surveillance

    Law enforcement agencies would be required to obtain a warrant in most cases to use cell site simulator devices, commonly known as "stingrays," to track people's mobile devices, under a newly introduced bill in the U.S. Senate.

  • June 21, 2021

    Top 3 Groups Lobbying The FCC

    Policy requests slowed slightly at the Federal Communications Commission during the month of May as lobbyists offered input on how a COVID-19 relief program for student connectivity should shape up and weighed in on the agency's broadband mapping efforts.

  • June 21, 2021

    5th Circ. Tosses Huawei's Challenge Over FCC Subsidy Ban

    The Fifth Circuit has dismissed Huawei Technologies Co.'s bid to block a Federal Communications Commission order prohibiting federal subsidies to U.S. telecom companies that buy equipment from the Chinese technology giant and others, ruling that the FCC appropriately determined it poses a threat to U.S. communications networks.

  • June 21, 2021

    Pa. Panel Says DA Doesn't Have To Share Camera System Info

    The District Attorney's Office for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, doesn't have to reveal to reporters what kind of cameras it used in an internet-connected surveillance network around the county since that information could be exploited by hackers, a Commonwealth Court panel ruled Monday.

  • June 18, 2021

    $110M Deal Reached In Suit Over $8.7B GCI Liberty Merger

    Former GCI Liberty Inc. directors have agreed to a $110 million settlement in Delaware to end stockholder class litigation over alleged maneuvers by its controllers and fiduciary duty breaches in GCI's stock-for-stock acquisition, valued at $8.7 billion, by Liberty Broadband Corp. last year.

  • June 18, 2021

    Satellite Group Says FCC Fee Structure Is Unfair

    A satellite operators' coalition has urged the Federal Communications Commission to revisit a rule that splits satellites orbiting at lower altitudes into two categories for purposes of regulatory fees, saying one group is overly broad and faces disproportionate burdens.

  • June 18, 2021

    Ohio Focuses On Getting Google Declared A Common Carrier

    Ohio's attorney general is seeking to split up his brand-new state court lawsuit against Google, preferring to tackle a bid to declare the search giant as a common carrier first and only then turn to a measure to bar Google from promoting its own offerings over competitors' as "unfair discrimination."

  • June 18, 2021

    FCC Commissioner Carr Wary Of NTIA's New Broadband Map

    As the Federal Communications Commission mulls how to fix its lackluster broadband maps, the U.S. Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration has released its own digital map.

  • June 18, 2021

    Conservatives Split On Bipartisan House Antitrust Bills

    A coalition of conservative groups has come out swinging against major bipartisan antitrust proposals that could see key votes on Wednesday in the House Judiciary Committee, calling them "a deceitful attempt by Democrat lawmakers to exploit legitimate conservative anger over Big Tech."

  • June 18, 2021

    Louisiana AG Wants To Join Texas' Google Antitrust Suit

    Louisiana's attorney general has asked a Texas federal judge to let the Pelican State join an antitrust lawsuit from multiple states over Google's display advertising practices, saying it shares the same complaints against the online search giant.

  • June 18, 2021

    For FSF's Randy May, Free Market Advocacy Is A Life's Work

    Randolph May has seen a lot of changes in the media landscape, from his days of tuning in to Walter Cronkite's nightly broadcasts in his college fraternity house to parsing the finer points of Big Tech censorship disputes today.

  • June 18, 2021

    Colorado Adds Wrinkle To Emerging State Privacy Law Quilt

    Colorado is on the brink of becoming the third U.S. state to enact comprehensive consumer privacy legislation, a move that's set to throw a curveball at companies' compliance plans and give further ammunition to the push for a unified nationwide framework.

  • June 17, 2021

    Sens. Aim To Make Hacks A RICO Crime Amid Attack Spike

    Bipartisan U.S. senators on Thursday reintroduced a bill that would clear the way for prosecutors to charge alleged hackers under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, in a push coming after cyberattacks hit a critical pipeline and global meat supplier.

  • June 17, 2021

    Live Chat Co. Wins $30M In Jury Trial Over Trade Secrets Theft

    Sequoia Capital-backed customer service technology company [24]7.ai ripped off trade secrets belonging to rival LivePerson and engaged in unfair competition that helped it land contracts with heavyweights like Sears and Capital One, a California federal jury found Thursday, awarding the live chat company $30 million in damages.

  • June 17, 2021

    Charter Sues City Of Rochester Over Threats, Excessive Fees

    Charter Spectrum has slapped the city of Rochester, New York, with a lawsuit accusing the city of trying to circumvent the federal cap on franchise fees by tacking on additional charges that the cable company says are just franchise fees in disguise.

  • June 17, 2021

    FCC Upholds $2.86M Fine Over Sales Of Uncertified Drones

    A unanimous Federal Communications Commission on Thursday reaffirmed its decision to fine a drone marketer more than $2.86 million for "egregious" FCC violations that allegedly threatened to interfere with government and public safety radio signals.

  • June 17, 2021

    Top EU Court Rules ISPs Can Be Forced To Share User Info

    An alleged "copyright troll" can get Belgium internet service provider Telenet BVBA to produce identifying information on customers accused of sharing its pornographic videos through the BitTorrent file-sharing network, Europe's highest court ruled Thursday.

  • June 17, 2021

    Covington Nabs Sidley Austin IP Litigator To Boost DC Office

    Covington & Burling LLP has bolstered its patent litigation practice in Washington, D.C., adding a Sidley Austin LLP partner with more than 25 years of experience litigating intellectual property disputes on behalf of leading technology companies before the U.S. International Trade Commission and district court.

  • June 17, 2021

    Netflix Tells 7th Circ. That Ill. Fee Suit Supports Fed. Ruling

    Netflix, Hulu and other streaming services told the Seventh Circuit on Thursday that a new federal lawsuit in Illinois supported their request to keep an Indiana suit over streaming fees in federal court to resolve similar issues in both cases.

  • June 17, 2021

    Senate Confirms Citigroup Exec As DHS Deputy Secretary

    The Senate on Thursday easily confirmed John K. Tien, a Citigroup Inc. managing director with decades of military and national security experience, as deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

  • June 17, 2021

    Ex-Astros Owner Must Face Suit Over Ill-Fated Network Deal

    Billionaire former Houston Astros owner Drayton McLane Jr. and Comcast Corp. can't use a Texas free speech law to duck claims that they lied to get a better price for the team and its stake in a now-bankrupt regional sports network, a state appellate court held Thursday.

  • June 17, 2021

    Groups Fear Media Competition Bill Will Expand Copyright

    While Congress eyes a bill that would give journalism outlets limited antitrust immunity to team up to bargain with big tech platforms like Google, consumer advocacy groups are raising the alarm about language that might implicitly extend copyright protection to links and headlines.

  • June 17, 2021

    FCC Advances Plan To Stop Most Chinese Equipment Sales

    The Federal Communications Commission voted Thursday on a plan that could further restrict the flow of Chinese-made technologies into the U.S., kicking off a rulemaking to examine how the agency can hone its device approval rules "to help keep insecure devices off the market."

Expert Analysis

  • DOJ Antitrust Letter Charts Path To Higher Ed IP Collaboration

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    A recent letter from the U.S. Department of Justice to a group of research universities indicated that a proposed technology-focused patent licensing pool contained sufficient competition protections, providing a collaboration road map that higher education can use to support further IP development, say attorneys at BCLP.

  • Opinion

    Fix Section 230 To Hold Online Platforms Accountable

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    Congress should amend Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act to clarify that online platforms, like other businesses, have a reasonable duty of care toward users, and to curtail the broad liability limitations that currently allow heinous content to flourish unchecked, says Neil Fried at DigitalFrontiers Advocacy.

  • Attorneys Beware: Zoom Depositions Are Likely Inadmissible

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    As legal proceedings have moved online in light of the pandemic, lawyers may mistakenly believe that recorded Zoom video depositions can be entered as evidence, but without certain safeguards, the testimony is unlikely to be accepted by courts, says Phillip Zisook at Schoenberg Finkel.

  • Opinion

    NJ Fed. Court Should Ditch Litigation Funding Disclosure Plan

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    The District of New Jersey's wide-reaching proposal to require automatic disclosure of third-party litigation finance poses several problems for attorneys and litigants alike and should be nipped in the bud, say Sarah Williams and Marlon Becerra at Validity Finance.

  • Complying With New EU Data Transfer Contractual Obligations

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    The European Commission's new standard contractual clauses for transferring personal data outside the EU, which take effect June 27, place significantly more onerous obligations on companies, but there are several steps they can start implementing to comply, say William Long and Francesca Blythe at Sidley.

  • Law Firm Talent Must Reflect Shifting US Demographics

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    Stephanie Scharf at Scharf Banks and Roberta Liebenberg at Fine Kaplan analyze and project U.S. demographic trends to show that law firms that hope to succeed long-term must recruit, retain and advance female lawyers and lawyers of color, and they outline six steps for meeting these goals.

  • How Standard-Setting Orgs Can Curb Patent Litigation

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    Standard-setting organizations should solve the burgeoning standard-essential patent litigation pandemic by emulating a successful solution from 2012 and introducing greater clarity into fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory policies, say Michael Carrier at Rutgers Law School and Brian Scarpelli at ACT.

  • International Tax Reform's Implications For Transfer Pricing

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    As the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development overhauls the global tax rules on base erosion and profit shifting, and the Biden administration rolls out new U.S. tax proposals, multinational enterprises need to prepare for the effects of these tax changes on their transfer pricing structures, say Mandy Li and Shuang Feng at MGO.

  • Opinion

    Bright-Line Standards Are Bad News For Antitrust Reform

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    Bills introduced by both Democrats and Republicans that would change legal presumptions regarding merger law and create bright-line market share thresholds can result in arbitrary outcomes that both sides of the aisle should abhor, say Daniel Sokol at the University of Florida and Abraham Wickelgren at the University of Texas at Austin.

  • E-Filing Mistakes Could Jeopardize Third-Party Trade Secrets

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    As last month’s Epic v. Apple trial showed, errors made when e-filing discovery documents can expose the confidential information of third parties, but case law is not firmly established on whether these inadvertent disclosures may damage trade secret protections — a legal issue especially relevant in the video game industry, say Carolyn Martin and Robert Piper at Lutzker & Lutzker.

  • Opinion

    Judges Should Foster Diversity In MDL Leader Appointments

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    Through their powerful function as gatekeepers, judges should open the gate to minority practitioners when appointing leadership positions in widely influential multidistrict litigation and begin to correct the disparities that have long plagued the legal industry, say Majed Nachawati and Michael Gorwitz at Fears Nachawati.

  • A Gov't Contractor's Road Map To Biden Cybersecurity Order

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    Following President Joe Biden's recent executive order to improve U.S. cybersecurity, Justin Chiarodo and Sharon Klein at Blank Rome highlight how four key elements will particularly affect government contractors and their suppliers, and what contractors should expect as they prepare to operate in a new compliance environment.

  • A Biz Strategy Model To Improve Lateral Atty Hiring Diversity

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    Quantitative comparison tools commonly used by companies in evaluating merger targets will allow law firms to assess lateral hire candidates in a demographically neutral manner, help remove bias from the hiring process and bring real diversity to the legal profession, says Thomas Latino at Florida State University.

  • How Curbs On Russia And Belarus Trade Will Affect Tech Cos.

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    Attorneys at Kirkland examine how the Biden administration's newly authorized Russian sanctions, restrictions on dealings with companies in Belarus and other likely measures will affect the technology sector and how companies should respond to the changes.

  • Smaller Firms Need Employee Wellness Programs, Too

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    As we emerge from the pandemic, small and midsize firms — which offer an ideal setting for companywide connection — should follow in the footsteps of larger organizations and heed the American Bar Association’s recommendations by adopting well-being initiatives and appointing a chief wellness officer, says Janine Pollack at Calcaterra Pollack.

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