Telecommunications

  • October 11, 2019

    Fox News, Anchor Harris Faulkner Hit With Discrimination Suit

    A former Fox News makeup artist on Thursday sued the network, anchor Harris Faulkner and several other network employees, alleging he was harassed because he's young, gay and Hispanic and was eventually fired after reporting the harassment.

  • October 11, 2019

    Apple-Qualcomm Patent Feud Still Rumbling At PTAB

    After striking a six-year deal they said ended all their litigation worldwide, Apple and Qualcomm nonetheless plowed ahead this week with several open cases at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board in the iPhone maker's bid to knock out several of the chipmaker's patents. 

  • October 11, 2019

    Rooftop Watering Hole Plan Weathers Antenna Dispute

    A Texas appellate court has upheld the scrapping of an injunction that blocked a Fort Worth building owner from constructing a rooftop bar that allegedly interferes with wireless signals, saying the trial court acted within its discretion.

  • October 11, 2019

    After Mississippi Exit, AGs' T-Mobile Suit May Dwindle

    The coalition of 18 state attorneys general suing to block the Sprint-T-Mobile merger showed signs of splintering when Mississippi departed the lawsuit, raising the possibility that other rural states will also strike deals securing additional mobile coverage commitments and cementing their support for the merger.

  • October 11, 2019

    Satellite TV Cos. Slam Broadcasters' 'Deceptive' STELAR Ads

    A Facebook ad campaign the National Association of Broadcasters is running to drum up support for the expiration of a satellite law is "deceptive," a lobbying group for cable and satellite providers said Thursday. 

  • October 11, 2019

    Lack Of Broadband Data Dooms Subsidy Cap, Groups Say

    The Federal Communications Commission should not impose an overall spending cap on its broadband and telephone subsidy programs because it still doesn't know the extent of the "digital divide" that the programs are meant to address, public interest groups said in a filing posted Thursday.

  • October 11, 2019

    Localities Urge FCC Not To Presume Infrastructure Rates

    The Federal Communications Commission should reject Verizon's attempt to lower what it claims are inflated wireless infrastructure fees in a Nevada county, an array of localities has told the agency, saying that ruling on specific acceptable rates would be an overreach of the commission's authority.

  • October 11, 2019

    Union Can't Avoid Charter Strike Arbitration, 2nd Circ. Says

    The Second Circuit ruled Friday that the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers can’t avoid arbitration with Charter Communications over a March 2017 strike, rejecting the union's argument that a National Labor Relations Board ruling meant it wasn't bound by a no-strike agreement.

  • October 11, 2019

    FCC Accounting Freeze Misallocates Billions, DC Circ. Told

    The telecom stakeholders fighting a Federal Communications Commission decision to extend a long-running freeze on a wireline cost allocation regime told the D.C. Circuit the suspension keeps local public utility customers on the hook for the growing costs of private networks.

  • October 10, 2019

    Towns Cut From Challenge To Maine's Cable Unbundling Law

    Fifteen Maine towns slipped out of a suit Thursday brought by Disney, Fox and other big broadcasters challenging a new law that would allow customers to buy channels individually without being locked in to a specific cable package.

  • October 10, 2019

    US-China Talks Resume With Hope Of Paving Way To Deal

    The Trump administration resumed its trade negotiations with China on Thursday as U.S. business groups tracking the talks expressed optimism that the two sides could strike a preliminary deal to avert new duties slated to take effect next week.

  • October 10, 2019

    9th Circ. Rejects Latest NFL Bid To Derail 'Sunday Ticket' Suit

    DirecTV subscribers scored a win Thursday when the Ninth Circuit denied the NFL’s bid for a rehearing en banc on the court’s decision to revive an antitrust fight over the pay-TV service's "NFL Sunday Ticket."

  • October 10, 2019

    Wash. Justices Side With T-Mobile In 9th Circ. Coverage Row

    Selective Insurance must cover T-Mobile's costs in a lawsuit alleging the telecom's antenna installation contractor damaged a building in Manhattan, a split Washington Supreme Court said Thursday, settling a critical issue at the center of a Ninth Circuit coverage dispute.

  • October 10, 2019

    Hold Off On Sprint/T-Mobile Deal, States Urge DC Judge

    More than a dozen states challenging T-Mobile’s planned $56 billion Sprint merger are urging a D.C. federal judge to wait until their suit is resolved before deciding on approval of a U.S. Department of Justice settlement with the mobile giants to avoid interfering in the states’ case.

  • October 10, 2019

    AT&T Affiliate Says Telecoms Owe $3M In Carrier Fees

    CenturyLink, Level 3 Communications and another telecom company owe more than $3 million in unpaid call transfer fees that they have racked up over the last two years but refused to pay, according to a suit filed in a New York federal court.

  • October 10, 2019

    FedEx Says Export Crackdown Violates Due Process Rights

    FedEx Corp. pushed back Wednesday at the federal government's bid to exit its suit over new export regulations, telling a D.C. federal court that the rules made some international deliveries impossible and violated its constitutional right to due process.

  • October 10, 2019

    Dish Won't Save T-Mobile-Sprint Deal, Economists Tell DOJ

    A group of economists Thursday accused the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division of shirking its principles by clearing T-Mobile's purchase of Sprint conditioned on a divestiture to Dish they say has little chance of preserving competition.

  • October 10, 2019

    Jury Confusion Sinks Ericsson FRAND Win, 5th Circ. Told

    Electronics maker HTC Corp. pressed the Fifth Circuit this week to overturn a jury verdict that found Ericsson’s cellular patent rates are fair and reasonable, arguing the lower court’s failure to offer clear guidelines on several fundamental elements of the case led the jury astray. 

  • October 10, 2019

    Don't Revive Huawei Wireless Patent, USPTO Tells Fed. Circ.

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board rightly invalidated claims from a Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. wireless technology patent that were obvious over prior art, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has told the Federal Circuit.

  • October 10, 2019

    Calif. AG Rolls Out Consumer Data Privacy Regulations

    California's attorney general on Thursday released long-awaited draft regulations on how companies should implement the state's landmark consumer privacy law, including guidance on how to respond to consumer data requests and how to avoid discriminating against consumers.

  • October 10, 2019

    Dish Strikes $1.25M Deal To Avoid EEOC Disability Bias Suit

    Satellite TV provider Dish Network has agreed to pay $1.25 million to avoid a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit alleging its online job assessment discriminated against disabled applicants, the agency announced.

  • October 09, 2019

    FBI's Foreign Spying Violated Americans' Privacy, FISC Found

    The secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court chided the FBI last year for trampling on Americans' constitutional privacy rights in its efforts to monitor foreign targets' electronic communications, the intelligence community revealed. 

  • October 09, 2019

    What Your Practice Needs To Know About Telehealth

    A monitoring sock that lets newborns go home from intensive care sooner. An internet-connected tablet that keeps diabetes patients out of the hospital. Innovations like these offer the promise of easing burdens on an overloaded health-care system while meeting patients where they are through technology. Here’s what you need to know about telemedicine and how it might affect your practice.

  • October 09, 2019

    Comcast Reaches Deal To Renew Vermont Cable License

    Comcast has agreed to build out 350 miles of cable lines in Vermont over the next decade in order to get its telecom license renewed by Vermont's Public Utility Commission, allowing the cable giant to continue providing service in the state.

  • October 09, 2019

    Cellphone Customers Divided On Automatic Call-Blocking

    Fewer than 40% of U.S. consumers want their mobile providers to automatically block calls from numbers that aren’t in their contacts, according to a new survey — a signal that the public might not be entirely enthused about efforts by the Federal Communications Commission and Congress to crack down on scam robocalls.

Expert Analysis

  • How Emotionally Intelligent AI Could Assist With E-Discovery

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    While artificial intelligence has already revolutionized the e-discovery field, the development of emotionally intelligent AI promises to explore data in an even more nuanced and human way, thereby further reducing the burden on legal teams, say Lisa Prowse and Brian Schrader at e-discovery services provider BIA.

  • Preventable Risks Your Law Firm May Be Overlooking

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    Although most lawyers are well-prepared to defend or justify the value of an insurance claim for clients, often law firms have not clearly identified their own potential liabilities, planned for adequate insurance or established prudent internal risk management practices, says Victor Sordillo at Sompo International.

  • 3 Policy Developments To Watch As US-China Divide Grows

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    While trade negotiations between the U.S. and China resume Thursday, it is difficult to imagine a trade agreement in the near term that could blunt the momentum of larger strategic forces pushing the two countries apart, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Insurance Cases Illuminate Business Interruption Disputes

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    A growing body of insurance case law provides that in instances of widespread destruction caused by natural disasters, policyholders are not required to prove their contingent business interruption losses on a supplier-by-supplier or customer-by-customer basis, but subtle differences in policy language can significantly impact coverage, say Barry Buchman and Greg Van Houten of Haynes and Boone.

  • 6 Ethics Tips For Attorneys Making Lateral Transfers

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    With lateral transfers between law firms on the rise, it is more important than ever for partners to understand the steps they must take to adhere to ethics rules and other requirements when making a transition, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Competing Refusal-To-Deal Tests At 7th, 9th Circs.

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    The Viamedia and Qualcomm antitrust cases in the Seventh and Ninth Circuits, in which the U.S. Department of Justice has taken positions regarding when a refusal to deal could be unlawful, may lead the U.S. Supreme Court to clarify the appropriate standard for refusal to deal claims, says Ryan Sandrock of Sidley.

  • Opinion

    Erosion Of Bristol-Myers Test In Class Actions Is Misguided

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    In two pending class actions, the Seventh Circuit and the D.C. Circuit may be slated to water down the U.S. Supreme Court's Bristol-Myers holding that state courts do not have specific, personal jurisdiction over nonresident plaintiffs' claims, even though there is no policy justification for treating class actions differently, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Consider The Power Of Tactical Empathy

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    By employing tactical empathy techniques to understand the interests behind the positions taken by others, attorneys can gain the upper hand in deal negotiations and litigation while still promoting and preserving long-term relationships with opponents, judges and others, say Shermin Kruse of TEDxYouth@Wrigleyville and Ursula Taylor of Strategic Health.

  • The Problem — And Opportunity — Of Implicit Bias In The Bar

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    Law firms are beginning to recognize implicit bias as a problem. But too few recognize that it is also an opportunity to broaden our thinking and become better legal problem solvers, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • Huawei Case Might Mean UK Forum Sets Global FRAND Rates

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    The U.K. Supreme Court’s eventual opinion in Unwired Planet v. Huawei will decide whether English courts are a proper forum for determining global fair license terms for standard-essential patents, and there are several reasons to question the English courts' creation of this approach, says Thomas Cotter of the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Thapar Reviews Gorsuch's 'A Republic'

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    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's new book "A Republic, If You Can Keep It" offers hope for our constitutional system through stories of American greatness, and sheds much-needed light on originalism for skeptics, says Sixth Circuit Judge Amul Thapar.

  • Opinion

    True Wellness Requires A Deeper Look At Atty Profession

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    While I applaud all of the law firms that have signed the American Bar Association's campaign to improve attorney well-being, to achieve a truly holistic solution we must ask difficult questions about what we do, how we do it and the expectations we have set for ourselves and our clients, says Edward Shapiro at Much Shelist.

  • Roundup

    Pursuing Wellness

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    In this Expert Analysis series, leaders at some of the law firms that committed to the American Bar Association's 2018 pledge to improve mental health and well-being in the legal industry explain how they put certain elements of the initiative into action.

  • What To Do When A Private Equity Firm Wants Your Business

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    With private equity firms clamoring to put an increasing supply of dry powder to work, business owners should come to the bargaining table prepared, and resist the temptation of a quick, off-market deal, say David Kaufman and Nathan Viehl at Thompson Coburn.

  • How BigLaw Is Adapting To Plaintiff-Side Litigation

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    While many have treated Kirkland & Ellis' recent creation of a contingency fee-based plaintiffs practice as market disruptive, it is another manifestation of forces that have been changing the business of BigLaw for some time, says Elizabeth Korchin at Therium Capital Management.