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Telecommunications

  • June 20, 2019

    BREAKING: High Court Punts On FCC Deference Fight In TCPA Row

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday declined to resolve whether federal courts have the power to scrutinize agency orders such as the Federal Communications Commission's numerous interpretations of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, finding that the issues in the case hadn't been properly vetted by the lower courts.

  • June 19, 2019

    Nokia Names New Top Attys As CLO Departs For ABB

    Nokia will elevate its current deputy chief legal officer and its head of patent business to the respective roles of chief legal officer and Nokia Technologies president, following the departure of the company's legal head, who will serve as ABB's general counsel, the technology companies announced Wednesday.

  • June 19, 2019

    Staying Awake Is Essential To Surveillance Job, 5th Circ. Says

    A Texas woman failed to convince the Fifth Circuit that staying awake isn't an essential part of her job as a surveillance specialist for Charter Communications Inc., and that her narcolepsy diagnosis caused supervisors to treat her like a "pariah" even after attempting to accommodate the disability.

  • June 19, 2019

    Huawei Judge Will Hear Sidley Atty DQ Bid In Fall

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday set a September date to hear arguments over whether to disqualify a former U.S. deputy attorney general turned Sidley Austin LLP partner from representing Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. in its fight against charges including bank fraud and sanctions violations.

  • June 19, 2019

    State AGs In Dicey Waters With Sprint-T-Mobile Challenge

    A federal court in New York will hold its first hearing Friday in a lawsuit filed by a contingent of states seeking to block the merger of Sprint and T-Mobile. And while the case is still in its early stages, it’s becoming clear that its direction will largely depend on the U.S. Department of Justice’s review of the deal.

  • June 19, 2019

    Intellectual Ventures Striking Deals In Wireless IP Fights

    Just months after Intellectual Ventures won a $43 million infringement verdict against Ericsson Inc. and T-Mobile over its wireless communication patents, it's inking settlements with those companies, plus Sprint and Nokia, at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board and in the Eastern District of Texas.

  • June 19, 2019

    New Bill Would Strike Big-Tech Immunity For Web Content

    A GOP senator proposed a bill Wednesday that would remove the legal shield that has long protected tech giants from being held liable for content posted by third parties, unless companies prove that their content-removal practices are politically "neutral."

  • June 19, 2019

    FCC Charts Next Steps Toward $100M Telemedicine Program

    The Federal Communications Commission will take the next step toward establishing a telehealth funding program when it votes in July to ask more targeted questions about how a $100 million pilot initiative to connect patients and doctors via the internet could be structured, the agency said Wednesday.

  • June 19, 2019

    Qualcomm Says FTC Wrong To Fight Stay Of Antitrust Ruling

    Qualcomm hit back against the Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday as it again urged a California federal judge to stay her blockbuster antitrust decision against Qualcomm’s high-tech chip licensing practices pending an appeal to the Ninth Circuit.

  • June 19, 2019

    FCC To Advance 'Modest' Changes For Kids' TV Rules

    The Federal Communications Commission, after more than a year of review, said it plans to slightly relax its children's TV programming requirements, making changes the agency said are necessary to account for decreased viewership in the era of web streaming and on-demand shows.

  • June 19, 2019

    Longtime Anchorwomen Say NY1 Cut Their Airtime

    Five female news anchors at cable channel NY1 have slapped Charter Communications with an age and gender discrimination suit that claims the media giant sidelined them once they hit 40 because managers wanted younger talent in front of the camera.  

  • June 19, 2019

    Starks To Hold Forum On Huawei Replacement Next Week

    Amid growing concern that foreign-made broadband equipment poses a security risk to American telecommunications networks, FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks on Wednesday said he will host a forum next week examining how to weed out and replace existing components that might be compromised.

  • June 19, 2019

    Ex-Alaska Telecom Exec Gets 5 Years For $270M Scheme

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced a former CEO of telecom company Quintillion Networks LLC to five years behind bars Wednesday for forging contracts in order to trick funders into investing $270 million to build a fiber optic data network in Alaska.

  • June 19, 2019

    Cox Inks $10.75M Deal To End Debt Collection Robocall Suit

    Cox Communications Inc. has agreed to pay nearly $11 million to get itself off the business end of a class action accusing it of making illegal robocalls in order to collect customer debts, an Arizona federal court was told.

  • June 19, 2019

    T-Mobile Says Wichita Keeps Hanging Up On Cell Tower Plan

    T-Mobile has asked a Kansas federal court to find the city of Wichita in violation of the Communications Act for repeatedly blocking the company's attempts to build a new wireless facility it says is necessary to shore up coverage in the town.

  • June 18, 2019

    Comcast And Contractor's $7.5M Wage Deal Finally Gets OK

    A California federal judge Monday preliminarily approved a $7.5 million deal resolving claims that Comcast and a nationwide cable installation contractor shorted 4,500 technicians’ overtime pay, ruling that the updated settlement proposal includes sufficient policy changes from the defendants.

  • June 18, 2019

    Utilities Oppose FCC's Small-Cell Streamlining At 9th Circ.

    The Federal Communications Commission undercut local governments’ ability to manage the safety of their utility infrastructure when it limited the fees municipalities can charge for new mobile equipment attachments and expedited review timelines, groups recently told the Ninth Circuit in friend-of-the-court briefs.

  • June 18, 2019

    HTC Fails To Get Wireless IP Suit Nixed On Alice Grounds

    A federal judge in Delaware declined Tuesday to dismiss two 3G Licensing SA patent infringement claims against HTC Corp. and three other global electronics firms Tuesday, saying one of the patents appeared to meet the U.S. Supreme Court's Alice standard, while further proceedings are required for the other.

  • June 18, 2019

    FCC Told Nexstar Conspired To Impair Minority Broadcaster

    A Texas-based minority broadcaster has accused Nexstar Media Group of a "calculated conspiracy" to undermine the broadcaster's operations after selling it three stations and asked the Federal Communications Commission to review the TV station chain's qualifications to be a licensee.

  • June 18, 2019

    Uber TCPA Arbitration Bid Fails Due To Unauthenticated Docs

    A California federal judge on Tuesday denied Uber's bid to arbitrate a man's proposed class claims accusing the ride-hailing giant of sending him and others unsolicited text messages, finding documents purporting to show the man had entered into a contract with Uber were not authenticated and filed late.

  • June 18, 2019

    FCC Plans To Strike Educational Priority For 2.5 GHz Band

    The Federal Communications Commission is planning a vote next month that could remove an "educational use" restriction on a valuable swath of midband spectrum, a move that would open the 2.5 GHz band for a commercial auction next year, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2019

    Fuse Ch. 11 Plan, Settlement OK'd Without New Creditor Vote

    The Chapter 11 plan of multicultural media company Fuse LLC received court approval Tuesday in Delaware after a bankruptcy judge said a settlement with creditors didn’t require a new round of voting and disclosures by the debtor.

  • June 18, 2019

    Deals Rumor Mill: Dish, Chi-Med, NiSource

    Dish Network is said to be close to dropping $6 billion to buy assets from Sprint and T-Mobile, Hutchison China MediTech has reportedly postponed the launch of a planned Hong Kong listing, and NiSource is said to be considering selling a subsidiary tied to last year’s deadly pipeline explosions in Massachusetts.

  • June 18, 2019

    DOJ Talks Show Broadcast Definition Must Change, NAB Says

    Two days of discussion at the U.S. Department of Justice yielded further evidence that antitrust enforcers are needlessly stopping broadcast deals because they are clinging to an outdated view of how stations stack up against online platforms, the National Association of Broadcasters said in its latest comments to the regulator.

  • June 18, 2019

    Rubio Targets Huawei Patent Suits Through Defense Bill

    Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., has filed a measure to block companies on certain U.S. national security watch lists, including Huawei, from bringing patent litigation in the U.S. court system, days after Huawei signaled it wants Verizon to pay for hundreds of technology licenses.

Expert Analysis

  • Digital Data Privacy One Year After Carpenter

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    Lower courts have begun to grapple with the implications of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 decision in Carpenter v. United States, which concerned the constitutional limits on government acquisitions of digital data. On the anniversary of the decision, Jonathan Cedarbaum, Nina Cahill and Sam McHale of WilmerHale analyze defendants' attempts to extend Carpenter's holding.

  • How New US M&A Restrictions On China Will Affect Tech Cos.

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    The Trump administration recently launched an unprecedented regulatory blitz designed to further protect domestic information and communications technology and services from what it considers Chinese threats. These steps will constrain transactions that could expand China’s access to the U.S. market and to U.S. technology — and some have an immediate effect, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • Border Phone Search Questions Continue In Fed. Court

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    A Massachusetts federal court's eventual decision on cellphone searches at the U.S. border in Alasaad v. Nielsen will further illustrate the differences in how federal courts apply the U.S. Supreme Court's 2014 decision in Riley v. California to the warrant-requirement exception for border searches, says Sharon Barney at Leech Tishman.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Can Improve Their Job Interviews

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    When evaluating potential new hires, law firms should utilize structured interviews in order to create a consistent rating system that accurately and effectively assesses candidates' skills and competencies, says Jennifer Henderson of Major Lindsey.

  • FCC's New Call-Blocking Ruling Necessitates More Oversight

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    While the Federal Communications Commission's recent ruling authorizing phone carriers to block unwanted calls is a laudable effort, the lack of any industry call-blocking standards or appreciable oversight is a cause of massive concern for many callers who do not know whether their calls will be connecting, says Eric Troutman of Squire Patton.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.

  • Law Firms Can Do Better With Their Mentoring Programs

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    There are a few practical, proactive steps law firms can take to create a mentoring program that pays dividends — instead of creating a mediocre program that both parties see as an obligation, says Kate Sheikh of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • The Latest Developments In Criminal Cases Against Execs

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    This spring, there was some noteworthy news in white collar government investigations impacting executives, including the first successful prosecution in the opioid bribery scheme and the first criminal charges for failure to report under the Consumer Product Safety Act, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 'Rocket Docket' Justifies Its Name For 11th Straight Year

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    The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia “rocket docket” is still the fastest federal civil trial court in the country despite some recent trends causing its median time to trial to grow to 13.2 months, says Robert Tata of Hunton.

  • Opinion

    Delrahim’s Antitrust Approach To FRAND Still Problematic

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    While a recent speech thankfully walks back some of Assistant Attorney General Makan Delrahim’s more extreme statements about the role of antitrust in policing commitments to license patents on fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory terms, it still fails to appreciate the positive role that competition law can play in ensuring compliance, says Thomas Cotter of the University of Minnesota Law School.

  • What May Be Ahead For PE Infrastructure Investment In Asia

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    Despite some softening in Asian infrastructure deal volumes in 2018 and the first part of 2019, both fundraising targets and long-term investment prospects remain strong for private equity sponsors, say Scott Jalowayski and James Jackson at Gibson Dunn.

  • China's Amended Investment Law Leaves Some Details Vague

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    China's recently amended Foreign Investment Law promises outside investors a more stable, transparent and predictable investment environment in China. But concerns remain that the law was rushed through to ease trade tensions, and that some of its provisions are not clearly defined, says Yuanyou Yang of Duane Morris.

  • Measuring The Value Of A Law Firm's Social Media Efforts

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    Most legal marketers struggle to show the return on investment of their social media efforts, but establishing and answering several key questions can help demonstrate exactly how social media programs contribute to a law firm's bottom line, say Guy Alvarez of Good2bSocial and communications consultant Tom Orewyler.

  • What To Expect From An Appeal Of FTC V. Qualcomm

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    Any appeal of a California federal judge's ruling in Federal Trade Commission v. Qualcomm will likely raise a number of interesting legal issues at the intersection of antitrust and fair licensing of standard-essential patents, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Reports On USMCA Offer Industry-Specific Guidance For Cos.

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    Recent reports from the International Trade Commission and the U.S. Trade Representative have assessed the likely impacts of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement on the U.S. economy. By reviewing the reports' predictions for their industries, companies can be better prepared in case the USMCA is ratified, say Francesca Guerrero and Kayla Toney of Winston & Strawn.