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Telecommunications

  • April 25, 2019

    ZTE Prevails At 9th Circ. In Wireless Contract Battle

    The Ninth Circuit held on Thursday that Florida law bars cellphone provider NTCH-WA from bringing breach of contract claims against ZTE over a wireless network deal in Washington because a Florida federal court already confirmed an arbitration award in ZTE's favor in a related case.

  • April 25, 2019

    Trump Telecom Adviser To Take Policy Post At Fox

    A telecommunications and technology adviser to President Donald Trump will depart the White House to join Fox Corp. as a public policy director in Washington, D.C.

  • April 25, 2019

    Witnesses To Calif. Reps: Pass Emergency Throttling Bill

    A California state bill that would ban the throttling of first responders' data plans when a state of emergency is declared would immensely help public safety personnel communicate during emergencies, witnesses told a California state assembly committee Wednesday.

  • April 25, 2019

    Rival VoIP Providers Strike $63M Deal Over IP, Antitrust Claims

    Two rival telecommunications companies that update landline networks for Voice over Internet Protocol technology announced a $63 million patent infringement settlement Thursday which also ends Texas federal court antitrust claims alleging the patent infringement suits were merely sham litigation meant to eliminate competition. 

  • April 25, 2019

    Carr's 5G Jobs Plan To Partner FCC With Colleges, Carriers

    A newly announced initiative to train more infrastructure workers for the fifth-generation era will include partnerships with community colleges to set up low-cost training programs and will focus on schools that specialize in trade skills such as electrical line work and those close to military bases, according to Federal Communications Commissioner Brendan Carr.

  • April 25, 2019

    Verizon Can't Use ERISA To Sink Age Discrimination Case

    A New York federal judge has sided with a former Verizon worker who claimed his firing violated New York City age bias law, rejecting Verizon's argument that his claims were preempted by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act and sending the case to state court.

  • April 25, 2019

    FTC Hit With Another Suit Over Robocall 'Soundboard' Stance

    The Federal Trade Commission was hit with another suit Wednesday challenging the agency’s interpretation that "soundboard" telemarketing technology falls under the purview of robocall laws, days after the Supreme Court declined to wade into the issue with a similar case.

  • April 25, 2019

    Grain Management Closes 4th Fund At Nearly $900M

    Communications sector-focused private equity firm Grain Management on Thursday said it had closed its fourth fund just shy of $900 million in commitments, nearly $150 million above the original target.

  • April 25, 2019

    Comcast Illegally Collects Personal Viewing Data, Suit Says

    Comcast “systematically” violates the legal rights of its subscribers by gathering viewing data and other private information without consent, according to a proposed class action filed Thursday in Massachusetts federal court that drew a sharp denial from the cable giant.

  • April 24, 2019

    Calif. Leaders OK Changes Curtailing Landmark Privacy Law

    California lawmakers have advanced eight industry-backed amendments that would scale back the scope of the state's landmark privacy law, including by changing how the law defines personal information.

  • April 24, 2019

    TCPA Debt Call Carveout Is Unconstitutional, 4th Circ. Says

    The Fourth Circuit on Wednesday struck down an exemption that allowed government-backed debt collectors to skirt the Telephone Consumer Protection Act's blanket ban on autodialed calls to cellphones, finding the provision violated the First Amendment's free speech clause. 

  • April 24, 2019

    Broadband Cos. Ask FCC To Leave Spectrum Leases Alone

    The Federal Communications Commission shouldn't shift the rules surrounding how swaths of the spectrum earmarked for educational use may be leased, several groups who hold such leases have urged the agency.

  • April 24, 2019

    '5GE' Ad Suit Points To Confusion Over New Mobile Tech

    AT&T Inc. and Sprint Corp.’s now-settled case over whether providers should be allowed to brand and market their souped-up but not quite 5G networks as some variation of “5G” shows there is debate over what constitutes true next-generation mobile service.

  • April 24, 2019

    Ericsson Wins Bid To Enter AT&T, Verizon Patent Spats

    Ericsson won the green light to intervene in a pair of patent infringement suits filed by an Australian tech firm against AT&T and Verizon, as a Texas federal judge agreed that products Ericsson sold the carriers will be central to the litigation.

  • April 24, 2019

    Media Firm Fuse Plans Quick Ch. 11 As Contract Row Looms

    Multicultural media company Fuse told a Delaware bankruptcy judge Wednesday it hopes to have the court confirm its prepackaged debt-for-equity Chapter 11 that will wipe away $200 million in debt in early June, but DirecTV said a contract dispute could slow down proceedings.

  • April 24, 2019

    Facebook Expects FTC Privacy Fine Of Up To $5B

    Facebook expects to be fined between $3 billion and $5 billion by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission for privacy lapses, in what would dwarf previous penalties the agency has given to technology giants, the company said Wednesday.

  • April 23, 2019

    Advocacy Groups Tell DC Circ. To Uphold Sex Trafficking Law

    A handful of advocacy groups have thrown their support behind a controversial new law meant to crack down on sex trafficking online, telling the D.C. Circuit there's no reason to fear the broadened protections will censor sex health and safety education.

  • April 23, 2019

    Utah Warrant Bill Raises Stakes For Cops' Digital Data Grabs

    A new Utah law that forces police to obtain a warrant before they can gain access to any person's electronic data could have implications far beyond law enforcement, including for how employers and big tech companies respond to police demands for data.

  • April 23, 2019

    Judge Lets Feds Use Suspect's Fingerprints To Unlock Phone

    A search warrant unsealed Tuesday in connection with a gun trafficking investigation in Cambridge reveals that a Massachusetts federal judge gave law enforcement permission to unlock a suspect’s Apple iPhone by pressing his finger to the Touch ID sensor.

  • April 23, 2019

    Garvey Schubert Can Seek Indemnification In License Row

    Garvey Schubert Barer has won the right to pursue equitable indemnification from any judgment that might be entered in a malpractice claim against the firm and a former attorney who has been accused of botching a license application for a low-power television station.

Expert Analysis

  • Rebuttal

    Jury Trials, Though In Decline, Are Well Worth Preserving

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    In a recent Law360 guest article, the author applauded the disappearance of jury trials as an inefficient, costly mechanism, but in doing so he overlooked the greater value of jury trials for our justice system, says Stephen Susman, executive director of the Civil Jury Project at NYU School of Law.

  • A Broader View Of The US Supreme Court Bar

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    During the past 15 years, three widely read articles bolstered by starstruck media have promulgated the incorrect perception — sorely in need of revision — that the U.S. Supreme Court bar is limited to a handful of elite lawyers, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Courts Are Filling In Justices' Design Patent Remedy Void

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's 2016 decision in Samsung v. Apple produced considerable consternation because it did not set a standard for calculating a design patent infringer’s profits to determine a patentee’s compensation. But the lower courts' response suggests any fear of unreasonable awards was premature, say Sterne Kessler attorney Tracy-Gene Durkin and consultant Gary Griswold.

  • Takeaways From DOJ Action Against Telemedicine Fraud

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    Recently unsealed indictments from the U.S. Department of Justice make clear that telemedicine will continue to be an enforcement focus at a time when telemedicine is expanding, and should remind providers to focus on compliance obligations, say Edgar Bueno and Matthew Wilmot of Morris Manning.

  • Opinion

    Jury Trials Are In Decline For Good Reason

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    A recent Law360 article reported on federal judges bemoaning jury trials' nationwide decline, but these laments are unfounded as jury trials have been replaced by better alternatives, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research.

  • TCPA Questions Loom As 11th Circ. Considers 3 Cases

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    As Florida district courts grapple with how to interpret certain aspects of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, three upcoming TCPA decisions from the Eleventh Circuit could offer guidance on how dialing systems and consent issues will be analyzed, say Ian Ross and Adam Foslid of Stumphauzer Foslid.

  • A First Look At Austria's Digital Services Tax

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    With its digital tax proposal this month, Austria joins the handful of EU member states advancing national legislation for a tax regime somewhere between income tax and value-added tax ahead of similar efforts by the EU and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, says Rick Minor of Womble Bond.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Circuitous Path To The Law

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    Instead of going to college after high school, I followed in my father’s footsteps and became an electrician. Later I became an electrical engineer, and then an IP attorney. Every twist and turn along the way has made me a better lawyer, says Joseph Maraia of Burns & Levinson.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Conrad Reviews 'The Jury Crisis'

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    In "The Jury Crisis," jury consultant and social psychologist Drury Sherrod spotlights the vanishing jury trial, providing a fascinating canary-in-the-coal-mine warning for lawyers, litigants and society at large, says U.S. District Judge Robert Conrad of the Western District of North Carolina.

  • Revamping Your Approach To Client Development

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    As a former general counsel for both public and private companies, my advice to law firm attorneys who want to attract and keep clients is simple — provide certain legal services for free, says Noel Elfant, founder of General Counsel Practice.