Telecommunications

  • December 13, 2019

    Judge Asks If T-Mobile Will Be 'Maverick' Or 'One Of The Boys'

    A Manhattan federal judge on Friday quizzed T-Mobile's CEO John Legere on whether the company would retain its maverick spirit after a proposed merger with Sprint or join the conventional class of carriers like AT&T and Verizon.

  • December 13, 2019

    DC Circ. Urged To Rethink Precedent In Net Neutrality Case

    The D.C. Circuit found earlier this year that precedent bound it to uphold the Federal Communications Commission’s rollback of net neutrality regulations, but advocates of the protections are lining up to convince the court it was wrong.

  • December 13, 2019

    Fed. Circ.'s FRAND Decision Will Put Spotlight On Juries

    A recent Federal Circuit decision will likely give juries the lead role in determining licensing rates in disputes over standard-essential patents, taking many aspects of such cases out of the hands of judges in a change that could help patent owners secure bigger awards.

  • December 13, 2019

    Cybercriminals Phished For Gov't Procurement Credentials

    Cybercriminals targeted the U.S. Departments of Energy, Commerce and Transportation as well as other federal agencies in a widespread campaign to steal login credentials from stakeholders in government procurement processes, security researchers say.

  • December 13, 2019

    8th Circ. Affirms Anixter's Early Win Over Fired Army Vet

    An Eighth Circuit panel on Friday affirmed Anixter Inc.'s early victory in a suit brought by an Army veteran who claims he was wrongfully terminated due to his past military status, ruling the “undisputed evidence” showed his poor temperament played a part in his firing.

  • December 13, 2019

    Electronics Cos. Fight Axed TV Part Buyers' Push To Join MDL

    Samsung, Panasonic and other electronics manufacturers caught up in lengthy litigation over the prices of certain TV and computer parts have fought back against certain purchasers' efforts to be included in ongoing settlement negotiations, arguing the push to join up comes far too late.

  • December 13, 2019

    Ellenoff Leads 2 Blank Check IPOs Raising $445M Combined

    Two blank check companies represented by Ellenoff Grossman & Schole LLP debuted in public markets on Friday after pricing initial public offerings that raised a combined $445 million, money that is intended to pay for acquisitions across several industries.

  • December 13, 2019

    Altice Europe Unit Valued At $5B In Stake Sale

    Telecommunications company Altice Europe on Friday said it plans to trim debt by selling nearly half of its Portuguese fibre business to Morgan Stanley's private infrastructure investment fund, in a deal that values the unit at €4.63 billion ($5.1 billion).

  • December 13, 2019

    US, China Strike Early-Phase Trade Deal To Avert Tariffs

    The U.S. and China struck an early-stage trade deal that will demand “structural reforms” from Beijing and halt a planned tariff strike against Chinese cellphones, laptops and other consumer items, the two countries announced Friday, marking a potential breakthrough in their long-running trade battle.

  • December 13, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen fruit producers team up with their insurers to sue Swiss shipping giant MSC Mediterranean, a £1.5 billion penthouse dispute involving the former emir of Qatar spill over into a libel fight, and lenders like NatWest, HSBC and American Express get roped into a product liability case involving eye care specialists. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • December 12, 2019

    PTAB Skeptical Uniloc Can't Amend Sensor Patent In IPR

    Samsung Electronics America Inc. faced tough questions Thursday from the Patent Trial and Appeal Board over its argument that Uniloc failed to meet the standard for amending a claim in a patent that wakes mobile devices due to motion.

  • December 12, 2019

    FCC To Update Cable Operators' Carriage Dispute Disclosures

    The Federal Communications Commission announced Thursday that it's considering shortening the amount of time that cable operators have to notify subscribers and local franchise authorities of service, rate and channel changes.

  • December 12, 2019

    Flashy T-Mobile CEO Touts 'Supercharged' Merger With Sprint

    T-Mobile CEO John Legere told a Manhattan federal court on Thursday that his company thrives on beating up on its rivals and that its merger with Sprint will benefit everyone, rebutting fears the deal will stifle competition.

  • December 12, 2019

    Gov't Eases Reporting Requirements Under Huawei Ban

    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council relaxed reporting requirements on Thursday for some federal contractors who have to declare they don't use products made by telecommunications giant Huawei and several other Chinese companies under an agency-wide ban on such equipment.

  • December 12, 2019

    Satellite Co. Tells Justices Int'l Rules Flouted In $1M Row

    A South Korean satellite communications provider has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review $1.04 million in arbitral awards to a Hong Kong-based company over a soured satellite deal, slamming the arbitrators for meddling in foreign affairs.

  • December 12, 2019

    NJ City Accused Of Blocking Installment Of Wireless Tech

    A New Jersey city has been flouting federal rules in order to block a communications infrastructure company from installing its wireless technology onto utility poles within the city limits, the company has alleged in federal court.

  • December 12, 2019

    Turkey Enacts 7.5% Digital Services Tax

    Turkey will become the latest country to hit online companies with a special revenue tax, as the country's recently enacted digital services tax recently went into force, according to a Turkish government publication.

  • December 12, 2019

    FCC Advances Plan To Split Up Auto Safety Spectrum

    The Federal Communications Commission unanimously voted Thursday to divvy up a spectrum band reserved for transportation safety uses, despite warnings from lawmakers and the auto industry that the plan would endanger drivers.

  • December 12, 2019

    Nokia Cell Tech Conspiracy Suit Moves To Texas

    A car parts supplier's suit accusing Nokia and other technology companies of inflating licensing rates for cellular connectivity technology will be moved to Texas after a California federal judge found Wednesday that most of the alleged conspiracy occurred in the Lone Star State.

  • December 12, 2019

    Australian Gov't To Beef Up Digital Platform Regulation

    Australia's government on Thursday released a road map of its plans to increase regulation of digital platforms, which include creating a new enforcement division and efforts to boost the bargaining power that media companies there have when dealing with large technology companies.

  • December 11, 2019

    Netflix Ordered To Stop Poaching Fox Executives

    A California state judge on Tuesday ordered Netflix to stop poaching Fox executives who have signed fixed-term employment contracts, handing a big win to Fox in the yearslong battle over Netflix’s allegedly aggressive hiring tactics.

  • December 11, 2019

    Dems Call Out McConnell For Blocking Vote On Net Neutrality

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is blocking a bill that would reinstate net neutrality from coming to a vote because he knows it will pass, a coalition of Democrats said this week in an attempt at holding the majority leader’s feet to the fire.

  • December 11, 2019

    Sprint/T-Mobile Trial Judge Weighs Harm Claim Of $4B-$8B

    A Manhattan federal judge on Wednesday questioned the lead economics expert for a coalition of states challenging T-Mobile's proposed merger with Sprint, hearing claims that consumers could suffer billions in harm from a lack of competition in the U.S. wireless market.

  • December 11, 2019

    Senate Panel Advances Divisive Spectrum Bill On Party Lines

    A Senate bill that dictates where C-Band spectrum auction revenues should go is headed to the floor after a party-line vote Wednesday, as Republicans batted down Democrats’ arguments that the measure gives satellite companies a massive payout for vacating spectrum they don't own. 

  • December 11, 2019

    Chinese Prof Keeps Huawei-Funded Wilson Sonsini Attys

    A Chinese professor accused of conspiring with China-based tech giant Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. to steal information from a California semiconductor startup told a Brooklyn federal judge Wednesday that he will keep his Huawei-funded lawyers from Wilson Sonsini despite snags that could arise from the arrangement.

Expert Analysis

  • How Cos. Can Obtain TCPA-Compliant Text Message Consent

    Author Photo

    In the Second and Ninth Circuits, adequate consent for text message communications under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act remains a highly litigated issue, but companies may be able to avoid liability by employing clickwrap agreements, double opt-in processes and opt-out mechanisms, say Natalie Nahabet and Sarah Shyy of Orrick.

  • Strategies To Maintain Privilege In Crisis Response Scenarios

    Author Photo

    In several recent cases, courts have overridden claims that attorney-client privilege applies to communications with public relations firms in connection with litigation and to documents generated in internal investigations, but businesses can use several best practices to avoid the potential risk of waiving privilege, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • FCC Order May Make TCPA Fax Class Actions More Difficult

    Author Photo

    Tuesday's Federal Communications Commission order on a petition for declaratory relief by Amerifactors Financial Group, holding that online fax services are not subject to the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, may have significant implications on TCPA fax class action litigation beyond the Career Counseling case filed against Amerifactors, say attorneys at Ice Miller.

  • How To Ward Off Nonclient Suits Over Lawyers' Speech

    Author Photo

    Because lawyers are often sued by nonclients based on public statements they have made, lawyers should be trained to avoid potentially actionable statements when speaking and writing, and they should also understand the overarching defenses against such lawsuits, says Matthew O’Hara at Freeborn & Peters.

  • State Net

    What State Lawmakers Will Be Focused On In 2020

    Author Photo

    A number of issues are expected to figure prominently on state legislative agendas in the coming year, including subjects as diverse as election reform, 5G technology, online marketplaces and insurance fraud, says Korey Clark of State Net Capitol Journal.

  • Opinion

    Can We Get An Administration Standard On Tech Standards?

    Author Photo

    It is time for the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's director to join the assistant attorney general in reevaluating the FRAND injunction policy regime to develop a balanced position that is fairer to everyone and ensures that the system stimulates economic growth and job creation in emerging technologies, says Robert Stoll of Drinker Biddle & Reath.

  • What Is A 'Reasonably Useful Form' For Production Of ESI?

    Author Photo

    While federal rules require production of electronically stored information in its native format or a "reasonably useful form," recent court rulings offer guidance on avoiding production of ESI in its native format when it would be unduly burdensome, say Matthew Hamilton and Donna Fisher at Pepper Hamilton.

  • Patent Decision Highlights Cross-Appeal Considerations

    Author Photo

    The Federal Circuit's recent decision in IPR Licensing overruled precedent to hold that the cross-appeal rule is not jurisdictional, demonstrating the complexity of this seemingly simple rule and its various applications within the circuit courts, says Michael Soyfer at Quinn Emanuel.

  • Wash. Ruling Offers Key Safeguards For Additional Insureds

    Author Photo

    In T-Mobile USA Inc. v. Selective Insurance Company of America, the Supreme Court of Washington recently strengthened the protections for so-called additional insureds relying upon inaccurate certificates of insurance — a win for both policyholders and entities named as additional insureds on others' policies, say Catherine Doyle and Brian Scarbrough at Jenner & Block.

  • Fox V. Netflix Ruling Strengthens Employment Contracts

    Author Photo

    A Los Angeles Superior Court judge's tentative ruling Monday that Fox is entitled to an injunction prohibiting Netflix from soliciting Fox employees under contract reinforces the protections that both employers and employees receive from valid employment agreements, says Anthony Oncidi at Proskauer.

  • Opinion

    Consumer Privacy Protection Deserves 5G Policy Attention

    Author Photo

    The 5G strategy currently being developed by the U.S. is destined to be incomplete until it articulates consumer privacy — as distinct from cybersecurity — protection as an important variable to consider in the 5G equation, says Stuart Brotman of the Woodrow Wilson International Center.

  • Perspectives

    Book Review: Who's To Blame For The Broken Legal System?

    Author Photo

    The provocative new book by Alec Karakatsanis, "Usual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System," shines a searing light on the anachronism that is the American criminal justice system, says Sixth Circuit Judge Bernice Donald.

  • 7th Circ. Ruling Forms Split On CAFA Jurisdictional Discovery

    Author Photo

    The Seventh Circuit’s recent decision in Dancel v. Groupon, which is at odds with Eleventh Circuit precedent, evens the playing field by giving defendants the opportunity to use discovery to demonstrate diversity jurisdiction in Class Action Fairness Act cases, say Bruce Braun and Stephen Spector at Sidley.

  • Google-Oracle High Court Fight Threatens Fair Use Ecosystem

    Author Photo

    Ideally, the U.S. Supreme Court’s upcoming decision in Google v. Oracle will avoid the case’s fair use copyright question altogether, as there are several reasons to worry that the thriving fair use scheme, which rests on the transformative use doctrine, will not survive the ruling, says Brandon Butler of the University of Virginia.

  • Fed. Circ. Data Patent Opinion Elucidates Software Eligibility

    Author Photo

    Following the Federal Circuit's recent decision in Koninklijke v. Gemalto that a data patent did not cover an abstract idea, software patent applicants and litigants must emphasize that an invention's technical contribution over the prior art is specifically described and claimed in order to defeat a Section 101 defense, say Michael Rounds and Andrew Freyer of Brownstein Hyatt.