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White Collar

  • June 20, 2019

    BREAKING: Justices Won't Revive Doctrine Curbing Executive Power

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused to strike down a sex offender law Thursday that gives the U.S. attorney general broad discretion over how it should be enforced, declining to revive a legal doctrine that experts said could vastly diminish the power of the executive branch.

  • June 19, 2019

    Jury Convicts NXIVM Sex Cult Leader On All Counts

    A New York federal jury on Wednesday convicted the founder of the NXIVM sex cult, whose members included a "Smallville" actress and a Seagram heiress, of all seven counts he was facing, including racketeering and sex trafficking, prosecutors said.

  • June 19, 2019

    Wife Of Slain Burr & Forman Partner Arrested For Murder

    Authorities say they have arrested the wife of the founding partner of the Atlanta office of Burr & Forman LLP, accusing the woman of murdering her husband last year.

  • June 19, 2019

    Thailand Hotelier Got Fraud Funds Via Coinbase, Feds Say

    A Swedish hotel owner based in Thailand has been arrested on charges of running a multimillion-dollar online investment scam and laundering funds through Liberty Reserve, a defunct payment platform whose founder is in prison, and popular cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase, prosecutors announced on Wednesday.

  • June 19, 2019

    Regulatory Inaction Will Drive Crypto Cos. Abroad, Rep. Says

    Facebook’s decision to base its planned cryptocurrency in Switzerland rather than the U.S. could be the start of a bigger trend if Congress keeps stalling on legislation, an Ohio representative who co-authored a bill that seeks to exclude digital tokens from the statutory definition of a security said during a House hearing Wednesday.

  • June 19, 2019

    Huawei Judge Will Hear Sidley Atty DQ Bid In Fall

    A New York federal judge on Wednesday set a September date to hear arguments over whether to disqualify a former U.S. deputy attorney general turned Sidley Austin LLP partner from representing Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. in its fight against charges including bank fraud and sanctions violations.

  • June 19, 2019

    Ill. Health Care Co. Exec Pleads Guilty To Medicare Fraud

    The president of a health care company admitted to an Illinois federal judge Wednesday that he is guilty of billing the government for Medicare-covered services that some of his patients did not need.

  • June 19, 2019

    NJ Disbars Pa. Atty Who Took On Clients While Suspended

    The Supreme Court of New Jersey disbarred a Pennsylvania attorney accused of practicing law in his home state on a suspended license, ruling Wednesday that he was no longer welcome to practice in the Garden State, either.

  • June 19, 2019

    Conspiracy To Bribe Haitian Officials Was Explicit, Jury Hears

    Recorded conversations involving two men who were pursuing an $84 million port project in Haiti offer clear evidence that they intended to bribe government officials in exchange for approvals, a prosecutor told jurors in Massachusetts federal court Wednesday as a seven-day trial concluded.

  • June 19, 2019

    Feds Say HSBC Holding Out On Key Docs In FIRREA Case

    A Brooklyn federal prosecutor asked a judge on Tuesday to compel HSBC to comply with a year-old subpoena in a civil fraud case against a former Deutsche Bank trader over the financial crisis, saying the government needs the files to prove its case under the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act.

  • June 19, 2019

    Deputy Solicitor General Calls It Quits After 30-Year Run

    U.S. Deputy Solicitor General Michael Dreeben, a U.S. Supreme Court lawyer considered one of the foremost criminal law experts in the country, is leaving the government after a three-decade run that included more than 100 arguments before the justices, U.S. Solicitor General Noel Francisco said Wednesday.

  • June 19, 2019

    Contractors' Ex-CEO Altered Letters To Gain Gov't Perks

    A former executive for two U.S. Department of Defense contractors has pled guilty in Florida federal court to altering documents that gave him and his employees access to free government benefits while in Afghanistan, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

  • June 19, 2019

    Texas AG Fraud Case In Limbo After Prosecutor Pay Ruling

    The prosecutors in a felony securities fraud case against the Texas attorney general couldn't convince a Texas appeals court to reconsider its ruling that they can't be paid $300 an hour for their work, leaving observers to wonder whether they will make good on a threat to withdraw from the case.

  • June 19, 2019

    Ex-Alaska Telecom Exec Gets 5 Years For $270M Scheme

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced a former CEO of telecom company Quintillion Networks LLC to five years behind bars Wednesday for forging contracts in order to trick funders into investing $270 million to build a fiber optic data network in Alaska.

  • June 19, 2019

    Traders' Euribor Messages Were 'Inappropriate,' Jury Told

    The former head of global trading at Deutsche Bank told a London jury on Wednesday it was "inappropriate" for traders at the bank to ask colleagues working on its cash desk to influence a key interest rate benchmark.

  • June 19, 2019

    Danske Bank, Ex-Execs Want Suit Over Estonia Scandal Axed

    Danske Bank and its former leadership fired back at an investor suit on Tuesday, saying the European money-laundering scandal miring the Danish bank has little to do with securities and nothing to do with fraud.

  • June 18, 2019

    Trump Urges 2nd Circ. To Freeze Financial Record Subpeonas

    President Donald Trump on Tuesday urged the Second Circuit to block congressional subpoenas that seek a vast array of financial records from Deutsche Bank and Capital One, saying the records are being sought for illegitimate, political purposes.

  • June 18, 2019

    Universities Hit With New 'Varsity Blues' Class Action

    More than two dozen rejected college applicants have filed a proposed class action in California federal court against the mastermind of the "Varsity Blues" admissions cheating scandal and eight universities tied to the headline grabbing case, claiming they were unfairly denied freshman spots while others bribed their way in.

  • June 18, 2019

    Calif. Green Energy Co. To Pay $7.7M To SEC For False Claims

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission reached an agreement Tuesday with a San Diego-based green energy company to settle allegations its higher-ups conjured a rosy financial picture to hide tepid results.

  • June 18, 2019

    Dershowitz Can Pursue Bid To DQ Boies Schiller In Sex Case

    The New York federal judge who initially refused to hear Alan Dershowitz's request to disqualify Boies Schiller Flexner LLP from representing a woman accusing the prominent attorney and retired Harvard Law School professor of sexually molesting her said on Monday that she would consider it.

  • June 18, 2019

    Avenatti To Face Fall Trial In $20M Nike Extortion Case

    A New York federal judge on Tuesday set a November trial date for embattled attorney Michael Avenatti over allegations he tried to extort more than $20 million from Nike Inc. in exchange for keeping quiet about claims of employee misconduct at the sportswear company.

  • June 18, 2019

    Feds Tell 2nd Circ. McDonnell Can't Save Skelos This Time

    Prosecutors urged the Second Circuit not to disturb the corruption convictions of former New York lawmaker Dean Skelos and his son Adam at a retrial last year, saying that unlike after their first trial, the U.S. Supreme Court's McDonnell ruling can't help them.

  • June 18, 2019

    Suspect Says US Can’t Charge Him With $2B Fraud In Africa

    A Lebanese salesman told a New York federal judge that the U.S. government has yet to show how it is related with $2 billion in allegedly fraudulent loans backed by the government of Mozambique.

  • June 18, 2019

    Feds' Denial On SEC Coordination Doesn't Impress Judge

    A Manhattan federal judge was unimpressed with one prosecutor's word that he did not use the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to gather criminal evidence against hedge fund co-founder Jason Rhodes, saying Tuesday he wants a full account of coordination between the civil agency and the criminal trial team.

  • June 18, 2019

    Antitrust Watchdog Accuses Drug Suppliers Of Market Fixing

    Four pharmaceutical companies broke U.K. competition law when they agreed to fix the quantities and prices of the supply of an antidepressant drug, which caused the National Health Service's spending on the tablets to peak to £38 million ($47.7 million), Britain's antitrust regulator said Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Digital Data Privacy One Year After Carpenter

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    Lower courts have begun to grapple with the implications of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2018 decision in Carpenter v. United States, which concerned the constitutional limits on government acquisitions of digital data. On the anniversary of the decision, Jonathan Cedarbaum, Nina Cahill and Sam McHale of WilmerHale analyze defendants' attempts to extend Carpenter's holding.

  • High Court's 'Separate Sovereigns' Ruling Is Good For Tribes

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Gamble v. U.S. — reaffirming the so-called separate sovereigns doctrine — preserves tribal prosecutors' autonomy and ability to respond promptly to offenses without worrying about the legal repercussions on federal prosecutions, say Steven Gordon and Philip Baker-Shenk of Holland & Knight.

  • DOJ's Citgo Case Highlights Reach, And Limits, Of FCPA

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    The bribes a Miami businessman recently admitted paying to executives of gasoline retailer Citgo violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, because Citgo is owned by the Venezuelan government. But there is scant case law for the U.S. Department of Justice to rely on in a case against Citgo itself, says Timothy Belevetz of Ice Miller.

  • The Fight Over DOJ's New Wire Act Opinion Continues

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    While the New Hampshire Lottery Commission secured an early victory this month in the court battle over the U.S. Department of Justice's drastic November 2018 shift on the Wire Act, the gambling industry remains stranded in limbo, say Christopher Tellner and Katharine Fogarty at Kaufman Dolowich.

  • 5 Ways Law Firms Can Improve Their Job Interviews

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    When evaluating potential new hires, law firms should utilize structured interviews in order to create a consistent rating system that accurately and effectively assesses candidates' skills and competencies, says Jennifer Henderson of Major Lindsey.

  • A Rare Antitrust Deferred Prosecution Agreement From DOJ

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    The significant question raised by Heritage Pharmaceuticals' deferred prosecution agreement — the U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division's first DPA with a company other than a bank — is whether it signals a broader openness to such agreements by the division, say Peter Huston and Alex Bourelly at Baker Botts.

  • Opinion

    Retailers Should Stay Away From Cryptocurrency

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    A number of big-name retailers are reportedly poised to begin accepting bitcoin and other digital currency, but given cryptocurrency's complete and utter lack of oversight, these companies run a perilous gamut of legal, regulatory, financial, ethical and reputational dangers, says cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark.

  • The SEC Is Cracking Down On Insider Trading By Lawyers

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    A recent series of actions brought by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission suggests that insider trading by lawyers may be on the rise. Legal departments and law firms should understand the four types of cases the SEC is pursuing in this area, says Daniel Hawke of Arnold & Porter.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Fateful Phone Call

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    When I was growing up, my mother was always the more mild-mannered parent. But during a trans-Atlantic phone call in 1991, when I told her I wanted to go to culinary school instead of law school, she started yelling — at a volume I had never heard from her, says Jason Brookner of Gray Reed.

  • Law Firms Can Do Better With Their Mentoring Programs

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    There are a few practical, proactive steps law firms can take to create a mentoring program that pays dividends — instead of creating a mediocre program that both parties see as an obligation, says Kate Sheikh of Major Lindsey & Africa.

  • The Latest Developments In Criminal Cases Against Execs

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    This spring, there was some noteworthy news in white collar government investigations impacting executives, including the first successful prosecution in the opioid bribery scheme and the first criminal charges for failure to report under the Consumer Product Safety Act, say attorneys at Miller & Chevalier.

  • 'Rocket Docket' Justifies Its Name For 11th Straight Year

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    The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia “rocket docket” is still the fastest federal civil trial court in the country despite some recent trends causing its median time to trial to grow to 13.2 months, says Robert Tata of Hunton.

  • Opinion

    FARA Enforcement Is No Slam-Dunk For Prosecutors

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    What support is there for the government’s recent theories of criminal liability under the Foreign Agents Registration Act? There are two possibilities, neither of which stands up to scrutiny, says Jay Nanavati of Kostelanetz & Fink.

  • What Securities Pros Need To Know About SEC Data Analytics

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s data analytics efforts have been repeatedly cited in SEC press releases announcing successful investigations and cases. Understanding the commission's work in this area is essential for compliance professionals at investment advisers and broker-dealers, say Charles Riely and Danielle Muniz of Jenner & Block.

  • Measuring The Value Of A Law Firm's Social Media Efforts

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    Most legal marketers struggle to show the return on investment of their social media efforts, but establishing and answering several key questions can help demonstrate exactly how social media programs contribute to a law firm's bottom line, say Guy Alvarez of Good2bSocial and communications consultant Tom Orewyler.