White Collar

  • June 30, 2022

    Treasury's OFAC Blocks $1B In Russian Oligarch's Trust

    In a bid to punish the Kremlin for its invasion of Ukraine, the U.S. Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control has blocked a Delaware-based trust containing assets worth more than $1 billion, in which a sanctioned Russian oligarch holds property, the agency said Thursday.

  • June 30, 2022

    DOJ Drops Hammer On 6 In Alleged Crypto Fraud Schemes

    The U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday it has charged six individuals in four separate cases with playing a part in cryptocurrency-related fraud schemes, including what it called the largest known NFT scheme charged to date.

  • June 30, 2022

    Fla. Payday Lender To Pay $39M In SEC Investment Fraud Suit

    A Florida federal judge entered final judgment in favor of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission after a Miami payday loan company agreed to pay more than $39 million to resolve claims it fraudulently raised $66 million from more than 500 investors.

  • June 30, 2022

    DOJ Charges 3 Fla. Men With Running $100M Crypto Scheme

    The U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday it charged three men who ran a purported hedge fund in Florida with wire fraud and securities fraud for allegedly generating $100 million in a cryptocurrency-based Ponzi scheme.

  • June 30, 2022

    DOJ, House Jan. 6 Probes Put The Squeeze On Trump Attys

    Federal investigators probing the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol have turned up the heat on former lawyers and legal advisers to former President Donald Trump, with bold investigative steps and explosive congressional testimony revealing the extent of their legal exposure.

  • June 30, 2022

    CFTC Accuses South African Of Running $1.7B Bitcoin Fraud

    The Commodity Futures Trading Commission filed suit Thursday against a South African citizen and his company for allegedly operating a multilevel marketing scheme to sell fraudulent investments in bitcoin throughout the U.S.

  • June 30, 2022

    Judge Orders Atty To Pay Bigger Fine In SEC Pot Scam Case

    A California federal judge has ramped up the proposed penalty that an Arizona attorney must pay the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over claims that he was part of a scheme to defraud would-be investors out of $25 million by touting plans for a pair of marijuana businesses in the Golden State.

  • June 30, 2022

    High Court Remands 11 Criminal Cases To Oklahoma Court

    The U.S. Supreme Court moved Thursday to reinstate the violent-crime convictions of 11 people in Oklahoma, including five for murder, just a day after ruling that states may prosecute non-Indians for offenses committed against Indians on tribal reservations.

  • June 30, 2022

    2nd Circ. Axes 13-Year Sentence In $25M Medicare Fraud Case

    The Second Circuit vacated on Thursday a health clinic manager's 13-year sentence for money laundering and conspiracy to obstruct the IRS over what the government calls a $25 million Medicare scheme, finding the case's complexity didn't justify delaying his trial.

  • June 30, 2022

    Womble Bond Boosts Criminal Defense Practice With NC Atty

    Womble Bond Dickinson has bolstered its criminal defense ranks in North Carolina with the addition of a defense attorney whose practice centers on complex criminal cases in the Southeast.

  • June 30, 2022

    Texas Man Convicted Of $240M Gov't Contract Fraud Scheme

    A Texas federal jury has convicted the owner of several construction companies on charges related to defrauding the U.S. Small Business Administration out of more than $240 million over 20 years by posing as a disabled veteran-owned business to secure government contracts.

  • June 30, 2022

    Ex-Mich. Gov. Pleads 5th In Flint Trial Appearance

    Former Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder appeared in court Thursday in a civil trial over the Flint water crisis, pleading the Fifth Amendment as he declined to answer questions about his time in office.

  • June 30, 2022

    4th Circ. Vacates Insurance Exec's Bribery Conviction

    The Fourth Circuit ordered a new trial for the owner of an insurance conglomerate and his consultant, who were convicted in 2020 of conspiring to bribe North Carolina's insurance commissioner by offering millions of dollars to reassign a regulator overseeing the conglomerate.

  • June 30, 2022

    Steve Bannon Seeks Delay Of July Trial, Cites Jan. 6 Hearings

    Former Trump White House aide Steve Bannon has asked a D.C. federal judge to push back his July contempt trial for refusing to cooperate with the Jan. 6 House select committee, claiming the committee's recent hearings have generated an "unprecedented level of prejudicial pretrial publicity." 

  • June 30, 2022

    Ex-SDNY Prosecutors Say Charges Against Trump Are Viable

    Former Southern District of New York prosecutors say evidence produced by Congress so far regarding the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, including this week’s explosive testimony, is enough to charge former President Donald Trump with conspiracy to overturn the results of the election.

  • June 30, 2022

    Ex-Ga. Judge Can't Avoid Computer Hacking Charges

    A former Georgia state judge must face criminal computer hacking charges because her contention that they constitute impermissible double jeopardy was raised too late, the Georgia Court of Appeals held Thursday.

  • June 30, 2022

    NJ Atty Can't Pause Overbilling Suit Amid Corruption Cases

    A New Jersey state appeals court on Thursday upheld a trial court ruling that declined to pause Holmdel Township's complaint against attorney Matthew O'Donnell for allegedly defrauding and overbilling the municipality while serving as its contracted special counsel.

  • June 30, 2022

    Feds Ask For Help Catching Fugitive 'CryptoQueen' Ignatova

    Top federal law enforcement authorities in New York asked Thursday for the public's help in finding "CryptoQueen" Ruja Ignatova, the fugitive head of the $4 billion global OneCoin cryptocurrency scam, dispelling rumors that the famed fugitive may be dead.

  • June 30, 2022

    Ex-Apple Legal Bigwig Cops To Insider Trading

    The former director of corporate law at Apple admitted Thursday to an insider-trading scheme that netted him hundreds of thousands of dollars, New Jersey federal prosecutors said.

  • June 30, 2022

    Ga. Justices Nix Ex-Fisher Phillips Atty's Murder Conviction

    A former Fisher Phillips partner's murder conviction and life sentence over his wife's shooting death was overturned Thursday by the Georgia Supreme Court.

  • June 30, 2022

    Trustee Looks To Claw Back $1.4M In Kossoff Firm's Ch. 7

    The trustee to now-defunct real estate law firm Kossoff PLLC sought to claw back $1.475 million from Valley National Bank, alleging sole member Mitchell Kossoff — recently sentenced for defrauding clients — drained firm funds with the bank's help to keep a family business afloat.

  • June 30, 2022

    Justices To Mull Limits Of Fraud In NY 'Buffalo Billion' Cases

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday agreed to consider whether private citizens who influence government decision-making can be convicted of honest-services fraud, taking up a case involving alleged bid-rigging by an aide to former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo in the state-funded "Buffalo Billion" projects.

  • June 29, 2022

    NY AG Blames Gunmakers For 'Ghost Gun' Violence Crisis

    New York Attorney General Letitia James on Wednesday sued 10 national gun distributors, accusing them of selling illegal firearm parts needed to make untraceable "ghost guns" that end up in the hands of people who commit violent crimes.

  • June 29, 2022

    Ex-Mich. Gov. Claims No Memory On Aspects Of Flint Crisis

    A Michigan jury watched recorded testimony from former Gov. Rick Snyder on Wednesday in which he repeatedly said he does "not recall" whether he was told various pieces of information surrounding the Flint water crisis, and also said he "feels terrible" the crisis happened.

  • June 29, 2022

    Jan. 6 Panel Says 'No Choice' But To Subpoena Cipollone

    The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection on Wednesday subpoenaed former White House counsel Pat Cipollone, saying the attorney's refusal to testify on the record has left lawmakers with "no choice."

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Tips For Meeting DOJ's New CCO Certification Requirements

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    In light of new U.S. Department of Justice requirements that chief executive and compliance officers certify the effectiveness of their companies' ethics and compliance programs, these executives should keep several considerations in mind to avoid undue personal liability, say advisers at StoneTurn.

  • Ethics Considerations For Attorneys Joining Nonprofit Boards

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Many charitable organizations offer attorneys board positions to benefit from their specialized legal knowledge, but there are ethical considerations and liability dangers that demand lawyers set boundaries about their roles and responsibilities, says Patrick Sturm at LexisNexis.

  • High Court's Opioid Ruling Shows Limits Of CSA's Reach

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Ruan v. U.S., demanding rock-solid proof of intentional impropriety to convict a prescriber under the Controlled Substances Act, provides reassurance to opioid prescribers, but the U.S. Department of Justice is unlikely to back down on CSA prosecutions, say Janelle Pelli and Michelle Peirce at Hinckley Allen.

  • Gov't Agencies Face Diverse Fallout From 5th Circ. SEC Case

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    The recent Fifth Circuit decision in Jarkesy v. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission will likely have a limited effect on the SEC’s enforcement program, but could portend a very significant impact for other agencies, especially those relying on administrative machinery to impose money penalties, say Daniel Walfish and Rachel Penski Fissell at Walfish & Fissell.

  • Recent Trade Secret Cases Show Sentencing Disparities

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    Sentencing disparities in U.S. trade secret cases have surfaced in recent years, and legal practitioners should know that courts have found that the intended loss does not necessarily equal the cost of development of stolen trade secrets or the defendant's intended gain from misappropriation, says Steven Lee at Lewis Brisbois.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Signals Judicial Shift On SEC Admin Process

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    The Fifth Circuit’s decision in Jarkesy v. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission signals a growing discomfort in the judiciary with the SEC's administrative process, and those dealing with enforcement actions should bring their constitutional challenges early and often, say Benjamin Daniels and Trevor Bradley at Robinson & Cole.

  • Thinking Strategically About The Weekend's Impact On Jurors

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    Clint Townson at IMS discusses how experienced trial lawyers and consultants can utilize the strategic value of weekends in their favor by accounting for how the weekend break affects juror cognition and decision making as part of an integrated trial strategy.

  • Dobbs Ruling Creates Compliance Dilemmas For Hospitals

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    Following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, hospitals in states with sweeping abortion prohibitions may struggle to reconcile state and federal legal regimes, including the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • Opinion

    Now's The Time To Address Archaic Law School Curricula

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    With law school enrollments jumping significantly ahead of a potential recession and more students graduating than the market can absorb, law schools should turn to creative solutions to teach students how to negotiate, work with clients, specialize and use technology to practice their craft more efficiently, says University of Colorado adjunct professor Jason Mendelson.

  • Lessons From Lawyer Fee-Sharing Agreements Gone Wrong

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    The recent fee-sharing dispute between Edelson and Girardi Keese is a reminder that lawyers who do not strictly follow the applicable rules may risk a disciplinary complaint, lose their share of the fee, or wind up in costly litigation with co-counsel, says David Grossbaum at Hinshaw.

  • LeClairRyan Bankruptcy Highlights Pass-Through Tax Issue

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    A Virginia bankruptcy court's recent ruling in the case of defunct law firm LeClairRyan shows there may be serious tax consequences for pass-through entity partners who give up their ownership interest without following operating agreement exit provisions and updating bankruptcy court filings, say Edward Schnitzer and Hannah Travaglini at Montgomery McCracken.

  • Potential Next Steps For DOJ's COVID-19 Fraud Enforcement

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    Although the U.S. Department of Justice's COVID-19 fraud enforcement has so far focused on individuals and entities blatantly abusing pandemic assistance funds, health care and life sciences companies should assess their compliance programs as the DOJ will likely turn to larger-dollar activity at the organization level soon, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Navigating White Collar Attorney-Client Privilege Waivers

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    In light of increased reliance-on-counsel defenses and waivers of attorney-client privilege in corporate fraud cases, defense counsel should think broadly about how attorney-client communications demonstrate that their client acted in good faith, and without fraudulent intent, says Edward Imperatore at MoFo.

  • 8 Steps To Creating A Legal Ops Technology Road Map

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    Legal departments struggling to find and implement the right technologies for their operations should consider creating a road map that summarizes their approach to technology changes, provides clearly defined metrics for success, and serves as the single source of truth for stakeholders, says Melanie Shafer at SimpleLegal.

  • 2 Years Since Liu, Disgorgement Case Law Is Favoring SEC

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    In the two years since the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Liu v. the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, circuit courts have weighed in to answer the decision's open questions, and recent cases suggest that courts are unwilling to disrupt disgorgement orders, even where the awards would not survive Liu scrutiny, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

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