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White Collar

  • April 24, 2019

    College Hoops Defendant Discussed Bribes By Ariz. Coach

    A University of Arizona basketball coach was again mentioned in a federal corruption probe when secretly recorded conversations of a defendant discussing an alleged plan to make illicit payments to a top recruit were played for a New York federal jury Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2019

    Ex-Platinum CFO Says Investors Knew Of Fund's Cash Woes

    An attorney for the former chief financial officer of a Platinum Partners fund told a New York federal jury his client did not defraud investors, saying they were told of the liquidity problems that led to the downfall of the now defunct $1 billion hedge fund manager.

  • April 24, 2019

    Ex-Texas Coach Admits Bribe From 'Varsity Blues' Mastermind

    The former men's tennis coach at the University of Texas at Austin pled guilty in Boston federal court Wednesday to accepting bribes to pass off a student as a tennis recruit, including taking $60,000 in cash from the man behind the so-called "Varsity Blues" college admissions scheme.

  • April 24, 2019

    Ex-DOD Official Says Feds Withholding Files In Fraud Case

    A former U.S. Department of Defense program office director accused of cheating the government out of millions of dollars in a scheme to misuse a small business contracting program has asked a New Mexico federal court to drop the case as sanction for the government's refusal to produce key files.

  • April 24, 2019

    Judge Who Let Wife On Jury Gets Colo. High Court's Attention

    The Colorado Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case arguing that a man’s conviction for attempted assault and possession of a controlled substance should be tossed because the trial court judge allowed his wife to sit on the jury.

  • April 24, 2019

    Epstein Ducks Modeling Agency Suit Over Improper Service

    Billionaire sex offender Jeffrey Epstein ducked a modeling agency’s lawsuit Wednesday when a Florida appeals court ruled the business had failed to properly serve him with the complaint at his primary residence on a private island in the Caribbean.

  • April 24, 2019

    Ill. Gov. Denies Wrongdoing After Reports Of FBI Tax Probe

    Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker denied wrongdoing on Wednesday amid reports he was under federal investigation over allegations he allowed a Chicago mansion he owns to fall into disrepair to claim property tax breaks.

  • April 24, 2019

    Rakoff Rejects Effort To Drag 2nd Mom Into Insider Trial

    The former Standard & Poor's analyst who blames his mom for telling friends about a secret 2016 merger can't call another mom to testify at his insider trading trial, U.S. District Judge S. Rakoff ruled Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2019

    Ex-Reading Mayor Gets 8 Years In Pay-To-Play Case

    The former mayor of Reading, Pennsylvania, was slapped with an eight-year federal prison sentence on Wednesday following his conviction last year on charges that he accepted campaign contributions from contractors in exchange for promises of work with the city.

  • April 24, 2019

    After 10 Days Of Jury Silence, Insys Exec Asks To Go Home

    One of the five former Insys Therapeutics Inc. executives on trial for conspiring to bribe doctors to prescribe an opioid spray to patients who did not need it is asking the court to let her await her verdict from home as the jury enters its 11th day of deliberation.

  • April 24, 2019

    Pa. Jury Convicts Ex-Biofuel Co. Execs Of $10M Tax Fraud

    A Pennsylvania federal jury has convicted a biofuels company and its former owners of defrauding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by lying about how much biodiesel they were creating to claim millions of dollars in renewable energy tax credits.

  • April 24, 2019

    Ex-Christie Aide's Bridgegate Sentence Trimmed By 5 Months

    A New Jersey federal judge on Wednesday cut five months from the original 18-month sentence imposed on a onetime appointee of ex-Gov. Chris Christie for a plot to orchestrate a traffic jam at the George Washington Bridge, five months after the Third Circuit scaled back the convictions of the former aide and a co-defendant.

  • April 24, 2019

    Evidence Shows Philly Union Leader Offered Bribes, Feds Say

    Prosecutors pushed back Tuesday against a powerful Philadelphia union leader’s argument that a bribery case against him is unwarranted, saying that putting a city council member on the union payroll in exchange for exerting government influence in the union’s favor amounts to a bribe.

  • April 24, 2019

    Trader Ran High Tab In Outings With UBS Officer, Jury Hears

    A day trader accused of receiving inside information from a former UBS Group AG compliance officer frequently spent thousands of pounds on nights out at Tramp, a private members club in London’s smart Mayfair district, a London jury heard Wednesday.

  • April 23, 2019

    Advocacy Groups Tell DC Circ. To Uphold Sex Trafficking Law

    A handful of advocacy groups have thrown their support behind a controversial new law meant to crack down on sex trafficking online, telling the D.C. Circuit there's no reason to fear the broadened protections will censor sex health and safety education.

  • April 23, 2019

    Aluminum Co. To Pay $46M For Faking Quality Tests

    An aluminum manufacturing company resolved a federal criminal case by agreeing to pay a $46 million penalty and admitting it faked quality tests on metal products used in NASA rockets and Pentagon missiles, according to filings made Tuesday in Virginia federal court.

  • April 23, 2019

    Adviser Admits Paying NCAA Football Players In Hoops Trial

    A former financial adviser turned agent for federal investigators testified Tuesday in the New York federal trial of two men charged with funneling bribes to college basketball coaches that he had paid thousands of dollars to college football players, a bombshell admission that hints at wider corruption in college sports. 

  • April 23, 2019

    What Drove DOJ's 1st Opioid Distributor Charges?

    The U.S. Department of Justice’s first felony charges accusing a drug distributor of fueling the opioid crisis involve familiar allegations of reckless painkiller sales that until now have been punished with civil penalties. But the accusations are also backed up by direct accounts of C-suite complicity, one of several factors that likely tipped the case into criminal waters.

  • April 23, 2019

    'Deception And Greed' Drove Platinum Fraud, Jury Hears

    A New York federal jury on Tuesday heard opening arguments in the long-awaited fraud trial of former Platinum Partners executives accused of conning the now defunct $1 billion hedge fund's investors, with a prosecutor saying the case boils down to "deception and greed."

  • April 23, 2019

    Utah Warrant Bill Raises Stakes For Cops' Digital Data Grabs

    A new Utah law that forces police to obtain a warrant before they can gain access to any person's electronic data could have implications far beyond law enforcement, including for how employers and big tech companies respond to police demands for data.

Expert Analysis

  • Gov't Contractors, Be Prepared For FCA Parallel Proceedings

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    The continued sprawl of False Claims Act cases warrants scrutiny of one of the statute's lesser understood characteristics — one set of facts can lead to concurrent or successive proceedings initiated by a combination of criminal, civil or administrative authorities, as well as private plaintiffs, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Justice Department's ACA Reversal Raises FCA Questions

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's about-face on Affordable Care Act constitutionality may discourage potential whistleblowers from coming forward unless the DOJ clarifies its plans to enforce the False Claims Act, says Cleveland Lawrence III of Mehri & Skalet.

  • Rebuttal

    Jury Trials, Though In Decline, Are Well Worth Preserving

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    In a recent Law360 guest article, the author applauded the disappearance of jury trials as an inefficient, costly mechanism, but in doing so he overlooked the greater value of jury trials for our justice system, says Stephen Susman, executive director of the Civil Jury Project at NYU School of Law.

  • A Broader View Of The US Supreme Court Bar

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    During the past 15 years, three widely read articles bolstered by starstruck media have promulgated the incorrect perception — sorely in need of revision — that the U.S. Supreme Court bar is limited to a handful of elite lawyers, says Lawrence Ebner of Capital Appellate Advocacy.

  • Takeaways From DOJ Action Against Telemedicine Fraud

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    Recently unsealed indictments from the U.S. Department of Justice make clear that telemedicine will continue to be an enforcement focus at a time when telemedicine is expanding, and should remind providers to focus on compliance obligations, say Edgar Bueno and Matthew Wilmot of Morris Manning.

  • Opinion

    Jury Trials Are In Decline For Good Reason

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    A recent Law360 article reported on federal judges bemoaning jury trials' nationwide decline, but these laments are unfounded as jury trials have been replaced by better alternatives, says J.B. Heaton of J.B. Heaton Research.

  • Few Avenues To Protection For Foreign FCPA Whistleblowers

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent decision in Wadler v. Bio-Rad falls within a larger pattern of federal courts interpreting whistleblower protection statutes narrowly — especially when employees raise allegations about international business and potential Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations abroad, say Daniel Wendt and Amelia Hairston-Porter of Miller & Chevalier.

  • Series

    Why I Became A Lawyer: A Circuitous Path To The Law

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    Instead of going to college after high school, I followed in my father’s footsteps and became an electrician. Later I became an electrical engineer, and then an IP attorney. Every twist and turn along the way has made me a better lawyer, says Joseph Maraia of Burns & Levinson.

  • Getting Compliance Right When There Are No Regulations

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    Recent enforcement actions and agency guidance illustrate how the federal government sets expectations for corporate compliance internal controls, even when no formal regulations have been issued. But companies must know where to find the relevant information, says Jo Ritcey-Donohue of JRD Law.

  • 4 Tips For Global Patient Support Compliance: Part 2

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    As constructing global frameworks for patient support compliance becomes increasingly important, health care companies should make sure to clearly mandate a proper purpose, protect patient data, and plan for the training and monitoring of third parties, say attorneys at Paul Hastings in the final part of this article.