White Collar

  • January 21, 2020

    SEC Says Film Producer Sold Fake Shares In Pot Company

    A Hollywood producer who branched out into the cannabis business allegedly bilked investors out of more than $4.8 million, in what the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission labeled a Ponzi scheme on Tuesday.

  • January 21, 2020

    Weinstein Loses 11th-Hour Appeal To Relocate NYC Rape Trial

    A New York state appellate court denied Harvey Weinstein's motion to relocate his rape trial to Albany or Suffolk county on Tuesday, issuing a terse ruling that rejected the last-minute bid to derail the Manhattan trial a day before opening statements.

  • January 21, 2020

    Weinstein Can Tell Jury Of Accusers' 'Loving' Emails

    A New York state trial judge ruled Tuesday that Harvey Weinstein's attorneys may tell the jury in opening statements about what they call "dozens and dozens" of "loving emails" from women who accuse Weinstein of sexually assaulting them.

  • January 21, 2020

    Justices Won't Hear Appeal Of Psychiatrist Who Bribed IRS

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to review a psychiatrist’s challenge to his 51-month prison sentence for bribing an Internal Revenue Service agent.

  • January 21, 2020

    2 Insys Execs Get Less Than 3 Years In Opioid Kickback Case

    One former Insys Therapeutics Inc. executive was sentenced to nearly three years in prison and a second got six months less on Tuesday for their roles in a racketeering conspiracy to bribe doctors to prescribe the company’s powerful opioid spray and lie to insurance companies so they would pay for the expensive drug.

  • January 21, 2020

    Sheldon Silver Partly Slips Corruption Conviction At 2nd Circ.

    The Second Circuit dismissed three of former New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s seven convictions on Tuesday in a ruling that could further limit how prosecutors pursue unsavory dealings among lawmakers.

  • January 20, 2020

    Execs Invented Barclays' Favored Status With Qatar, Jury Told

    Two former Barclays executives on trial for fraud invented the concept that the bank would become a preferred provider of banking services to Qatar via a side deal to emergency fundraising launched by the lender, a Serious Fraud Office prosecutor told a jury in London on Monday.

  • January 20, 2020

    German Prosecutors Charge 7 In Dividend Tax Scandal

    Prosecutors in the German city of Frankfurt said Monday they are charging seven individuals with serious tax evasion for allegedly taking part in a wide-ranging tax scandal known as a cum-ex fraud.

  • January 17, 2020

    CBD Co. Slams Former Exec's Murder Plot Allegation

    A Colorado CBD wholesaler accused of trying to kidnap and murder an ex-employee fired back at the former executive who made the claim, saying she was the one wrapped up in the murder-for-hire scheme as part of a vendetta against the company.

  • January 17, 2020

    Ex-NY Congressman Gets Over 2 Years For Insider Trading

    Former U.S. Rep. Christopher Collins of New York was sentenced to over two years in prison Friday for leaking inside information to help his son avoid biotech investment losses and then lying to the FBI.

  • January 17, 2020

    Fox Rothschild Ruling Tames Fears Of Nonclient Claims In NJ

    The New Jersey Supreme Court’s recent refusal to saddle Fox Rothschild LLP with a fiduciary duty to a victim of incarcerated Ponzi schemer Eliyahu Weinstein caged what many law firms consider a growing menace of claims brought by nonclients shouldering major financial losses, experts said.

  • January 17, 2020

    Ex-Pa. Mayor Can't Upend 8-Year Sentence For Bribery

    The Third Circuit denied a bid by the former mayor of Reading, Pennsylvania, to slash an eight-year federal prison sentence stemming from his 2018 conviction on charges that he took campaign contributions from contractors in exchange for promises of work with the city.

  • January 17, 2020

    Stockholder Accuses PPG Execs Of Lax Financial Oversight

    A former PPG Industries executive harmed the company and cost it millions of dollars in market valuation and goodwill with accounting practices that "smoothed out" financial ups and downs from 2016-2018, according to a derivative lawsuit a stockholder filed Thursday in a Pennsylvania federal court.

  • January 17, 2020

    Weinstein Jury Includes Woman Who Wrote On Predatory Men

    A New York state court swore in 12 jurors in Harvey Weinstein's rape trial on Friday, one of whom wrote a book about young women who confront "predatory" older men, sparking a failed mistrial motion and a rejected plea to wait for an appellate ruling that could relocate the trial.

  • January 17, 2020

    Former RBC Analyst Avoids Prison For Insider Trading

    A Manhattan federal judge on Friday allowed a former RBC Capital Markets junior analyst to avoid prison for reaping $126,000 of profit via insider trading, including trading ahead of a secret private equity deal, crediting his quick guilty plea and remorse.

  • January 17, 2020

    Bradley Arant Nabs Former Assistant US Atty In NC

    A former assistant U.S. attorney has joined Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP as a partner in the firm's government enforcement and investigations practice group.

  • January 17, 2020

    Feds Seek To Jam Revolving Door In High-Profile Cases

    Federal prosecutors are questioning whether a Skadden attorney should be disqualified from defending a former trader at JP Morgan against spoofing charges in the latest example of the U.S. Department of Justice claiming an ex-government attorney may have brought too much inside information through the revolving door.

  • January 17, 2020

    SEC Fights Bahamian Adviser's Bid To Kill Fraud Suit

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission urged a Colorado federal court to keep alive its suit accusing Mediatrix Capital Inc. of defrauding investors out of millions through unregistered offerings and stolen funds, arguing that contrary to the adviser's argument, the investment funds they sold do constitute securities.

  • January 17, 2020

    'Varsity Blues' Parents Could Be Headed For 3 Trials This Year

    The case against Lori Loughlin and other parents charged in the college admissions scandal known as “Varsity Blues” could be headed for as many as three trials later this year, a Massachusetts federal judge said in court Friday.

  • January 17, 2020

    NJ Court Urged Not To Toss Suit Against Disbarred Pol

    The former running mate of a disbarred attorney and ex-New Jersey mayor who was convicted on extortion charges is urging a county court not to toss his malpractice suit against Peter Cammarano, arguing he has submitted sufficient information for the case to proceed.

  • January 17, 2020

    Blockchain Duo Accused Of $30M Investment Scheme

    Two people with a blockchain technology company were charged in New Jersey federal court Friday with duping investors about their backgrounds and business relationships to raise $30 million in cash and cryptocurrency, with prosecutors alleging one fraudster used aliases and changed his appearance to hide his criminal past.

  • January 17, 2020

    RBS Demands £24M From Insurers Over Madoff Fraud Losses

    The Royal Bank of Scotland has taken aim at five insurers who wrote computer fraud policies for one of its subsidiaries, saying it is owed more than £24 million ($31.3 million) for losses caused by Bernard Madoff’s investment vehicle.

  • January 17, 2020

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen a tech company sue an online football stock exchange, a number of seafood distributors and their insurers sue cargo company Maersk, and several hotels add to Visa and MasterCard's swipe-fee class action woes. Here, Law360 looks at these claims and more. 

  • January 17, 2020

    Jail Talk Was 'Shorthand' For Qatar Deal Risks, Jury Told

    A former Barclays executive accused of fraud testified Friday that his jokes about avoiding prison because of the bad food and "worse sex" while organizing a crucial cash injection from Qatar during the financial crisis were “shorthand” for ensuring the transaction was legal.

  • January 16, 2020

    Michael Flynn Sentencing Delayed After Bid To Pull Guilty Plea

    A D.C. federal judge on Thursday pushed back sentencing for former Trump administration adviser Michael Flynn, who earlier this week asked for permission to cancel his guilty plea for lying to the FBI, accusing prosecutors of "vindictiveness" and acting in "bad faith."

Expert Analysis

  • Key Trends In Energy Antitrust Enforcement And Litigation

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    Antitrust agencies and private litigants continued to focus on the energy industry in 2019, and new antitrust policy initiatives announced by the U.S. Department of Justice last year will offer energy companies opportunities to avoid prosecution in certain cases, say attorneys at Vinson & Elkins.

  • 5 Predictions For FCPA Enforcement In 2020

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    In addition to joining the chorus of others who predict that increased global engagement by U.S. authorities will lead to record levels of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement, we also expect 2020 will bring changes in FCPA restitution, calculation of damages, declinations to prosecute and more, say attorneys at V&E.

  • Managing Money Laundering Risk In The Art Trade

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    The Office of Foreign Assets Control's recent declaration that a Lebanese art dealer's gallery was used to conceal Hezbollah financing is a reminder to the art community of the need for strict compliance with U.S. criminal anti-money laundering laws, say Nicole Horowitz and Brendan Hanifin of Ropes & Gray.

  • How Associate Life Has Evolved Over The Past Decade

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    During the last 10 years, the need to embrace change was fundamental for law firms, and that change affected associates in many ways — most, but not all, for the better, says Brad Kaufman, co-president of Greenberg Traurig.

  • Energy Cos. Face China State Secrecy Law Risks

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    Multinational energy and natural resources companies doing business in China face particular risks related to China's state secrecy laws, due to the broad and vaguely defined range of information that may be classified as secret, say Alvin Xiao and Fabian Roday of Fangda Partners.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Could Lower Bar For Insider Trading Charges

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    ​​​​​​​The Second Circuit’s recent decision in U.S. v. Blaszczak potentially makes it easier to prosecute insider trading cases by ruling the government doesn't need to prove an insider received any personal benefit in exchange for sharing material, nonpublic information, say attorneys at Goodwin.

  • 2019 Trends In DOJ Civil Health Care Fraud Cases

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    Last year, the U.S. Department of Justice maintained aggressive enforcement efforts in the health care industry, again relying heavily on the False Claims Act, but the agency is also taking steps to guide those efforts toward fairness and consistency, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • FinCEN's Most Lethal AML Weapon Against Foreign Banks

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    As the U.S. Financial Crimes Enforcement Network plans to increase its use of so-called special measures under the USA Patriot Act, it is a good bet FinCEN will focus its efforts to exile foreign banks it believes pose a money laundering threat to the U.S. financial system, says Arthur Middlemiss at Lewis Baach.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Dyk Reviews 'Democracy And Equality'

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    In their new book "Democracy and Equality: The Enduring Constitutional Vision of the Warren Court," Geoffrey Stone and David Strauss provide valuable context for U.S. Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice Earl Warren that have profoundly affected the country, but their overly protective attitude sometimes obscures reality, says Federal Circuit Judge Timothy Dyk.

  • 2019 Trends In DOJ Health Care Enforcement

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    Last year, opioid-related enforcement was the U.S. Department of Justice's top priority, in addition to a sustained focus on the prosecution of private individuals and data-driven identification of health care fraud, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Reviewing 2019's White Collar Cases And Controversies

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    From the “Varsity Blues” investigation to the Mueller report, white collar criminal cases were at the forefront of the national dialogue last year. Attorneys at Keker Van Nest look back at the most significant white collar cases and trends from 2019 and highlight what to watch for in 2020.

  • 7 Insider Tips For Working With In-House Counsel

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    For outside firms wondering how to best support busy in-house lawyers, several practices can help navigate critical legal issues and novel business challenges while strengthening the working relationship, says Virginia Hudson, associate general counsel at Capital One.

  • 50 Years Later, Interpretive Challenges Remain For RICO

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    In the 50 years since the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was passed, courts' attempts to clarify the statute have had some success, but many interpretive dilemmas remain unresolved, says Randy Gordon of Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Ransomware’s Year-End Thank You Note To Bitcoin

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    Last year's surge in ransomware attacks got a boost from Bitcoin, which helped cybercriminals carry out their extortion schemes with much greater ease, efficiency and speed, says cybersecurity consultant John Reed Stark.

  • 7 Ethics Tips For Lawyers' Pretrial Social Media Use

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    As ethical constraints on pretrial social media use evolve, the American Bar Association's Model Rules and several court opinions provide guidance on avoiding violations when collecting evidence, researching jurors and friending judges, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Mark Davis at Harris Wiltshire.