White Collar

  • October 14, 2019

    Barclays Exec 'Fretted' Qatar Fees Looked Like Bribe

    A former Barclays executive told in-house lawyers he was worried that a secret payment to Qatar to secure an investment as part of an emergency fundraising during the financial crisis would be seen as a bribe, prosecutors said at a London fraud trial Monday.

  • October 11, 2019

    Trump Attys Tell 2nd Circ. Presidents Immune From Criminal Probes

    Lawyers for President Donald Trump argued Friday that as a sitting president, he has “absolute immunity” from criminal investigations and therefore the Second Circuit should block the Manhattan district attorney from subpoenaing Trump’s tax returns.

  • October 11, 2019

    State Dept. Hit With FOIA Suit For Info On Giuliani In Ukraine

    The Protect Democracy Project sued the U.S. Department of State in Massachusetts federal court on Friday in a quest for information about interactions Rudy Giuliani has had regarding how his client President Donald Trump's "personal political interests may have come to dominate U.S. diplomatic activities in Ukraine."

  • October 11, 2019

    NXIVM Sex Cult Atty's Bid For Prosecutor Gig Comes To End

    An attorney who represents the convicted founder of the NXIVM sex cult no longer has her application pending for a job in the U.S. attorney's office for the Eastern District of New York, following concerns the job pursuit could be a conflict of interest in the high-profile racketeering and sex trafficking case against Keith Raniere.

  • October 11, 2019

    Look Beyond Crypto Labels, SEC, CFTC And FinCEN Warn

    A trio of federal financial regulators released a joint statement on Friday urging anyone dealing with digital currencies to ensure they are adhering to obligations under anti-money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism regulations, regardless of what those digital assets are called.

  • October 11, 2019

    Feds Call Ex-Deutsche Traders 'Emblematic' Of Banking Ills

    Federal prosecutors say two former Deutsche Bank traders’ deserve substantial prison time for Libor rigging as a crime “emblematic” of big banks’ bad behavior, while the traders argue that they had already suffered enough as two of the few to be prosecuted over the international scandal.

  • October 11, 2019

    SF Businessman Tied To Giuliani Associates Gets $1M Bond

    A California federal judge set a $1 million bond on Friday for a San Francisco businessman facing charges that he and associates of the president's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani violated campaign finance laws in seeking influence for Ukrainian officials, ordering the man to home detention once he posts the money.

  • October 11, 2019

    Rakoff Hammers Salon Owner With $500K Insider Trading Fine

    U.S. District Judge Jed S. Rakoff allowed Manhattan hairdresser Abell Oujaddou to avoid prison for insider trading Friday, citing his remorse and cooperation with prosecutors, but smacked the wealthy business owner with a $500,000 fine for a crime of "sheer greed."

  • October 11, 2019

    Boustani Heads To Trial In $2B Mozambique Fraud Case

    The long-awaited trial of Privinvest executive Jean Boustani over his role in a securities fraud, bribery and kickback scheme involving $2 billion in Mozambican government loans is scheduled to commence on Tuesday.

  • October 11, 2019

    Chicago Man Ran Illegal Sports Gambling Business, Feds Say

    A Chicago resident ran an illegal gambling business and hid that work and related income in a bankruptcy proceeding he initiated to escape a $1.5 million civil judgment, according to charges federal prosecutors made public Friday.

  • October 11, 2019

    No Prison For 'Varsity Blues' Burrito Magnate Who Paid Cash

    Paying his “Varsity Blues” bribe in cash saved a frozen foods entrepreneur from spending time behind bars, as he became the first parent to plead guilty in the college admissions case and avoid prison time following a Friday afternoon hearing.

  • October 11, 2019

    Chicago's Ex-Chief Judge Turns To 'Unfinished Business'

    After 25 years on the federal bench in Chicago, former Chief U.S. District Judge Rubén Castillo is returning to private practice as a man with a mission, ready to tackle "unfinished business."

  • October 11, 2019

    '$40 Billion Man' Accused Of Running Fuel Supply Ponzi

    A Houston-based company that buys and sells fuel has filed a lawsuit against a former business partner whose CEO styles himself as "the $40 Billion Man," alleging the partner company is actually operating a Ponzi scheme.

  • October 11, 2019

    NY Judge Charged With Obstructing Credit Union Probe

    A Brooklyn state court judge was arrested Friday on charges of obstructing Manhattan federal prosecutors' probe into corruption at Municipal Credit Union, while an ex-cop was charged with embezzling from the credit union and peddling pills to its convicted CEO.

  • October 11, 2019

    Nevada Gov. Targets Pot Market Corruption After Busts

    Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak formed a task force to root out corruption in the state’s cannabis industry on Friday, saying he was “outraged” by allegations that associates of President Donald Trump's lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, funneled Russian cash to Nevada political candidates in a bid to obtain a cannabis license.

  • October 11, 2019

    Injury Atty Indicted, Accused Of Trying To Hide $1M From IRS

    A Detroit-area personal injury attorney has been indicted in a Michigan federal court on 10 counts of tax evasion and tax fraud accusing him of trying to hide about $1 million from the IRS, the Department of Justice said Friday.

  • October 11, 2019

    Fyre Fest Ticket Holders Want Ja Rule Back In $100M Suit

    Just when rapper Ja Rule thought he was out, jilted Fyre Festival ticket holders suing for $100 million are trying to pull him back in, claiming new information shows he was promoting the doomed festival even as he knew it was destined for spectacular failure.

  • October 11, 2019

    9 Months For Ex-Accountant Who Leaked Secrets To KPMG

    A Manhattan federal judge hit former Public Company Accounting Oversight Board accountant Jeffrey Wada with nine months in prison Friday for passing inspection secrets from the financial watchdog to KPMG, calling him a “crucial” component of an illegal scheme that led to six convictions.

  • October 11, 2019

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week has seen asset manager BlueCrest drag a U.S. hedge fund into court following its expansion into the U.K., a City watchdog sue a Panamanian connected to an illegal land sale scheme and a Hong Kong food distributor file suit against shipping giant MSC. Here, Law360 looks at those and other new claims in the U.K.

  • October 11, 2019

    Ex-Barclays Execs Faked Paper Trail To Hide Fraud, Jury Told

    Barclays executives who conspired to pay £322 million ($396 million) in secret fees to secure capital from Qatar during the financial crisis created a fake “audit trail” to cover their tracks, prosecutors told a London jury Friday during the bankers’ fraud trial.

  • October 11, 2019

    Financial Adviser Pleads Guilty In Ecuador Oil Bribery Case

    A former Miami financial adviser pled guilty Friday on the eve of a trial in a federal criminal case claiming he violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act by funneling millions to Ecuadorian oil officials to secure contracts for a private company.

  • October 11, 2019

    Trump Business Records Can Be Subpoenaed, DC Circ. Says

    President Donald Trump's longtime accounting firm must hand over business records to a congressional committee investigating the president, the D.C. Circuit said in a split decision Friday, upholding a trial judge's ruling in favor of House Democrats.

  • October 11, 2019

    SEC Seeks OK Of Deal With Investor In Tribal Bond Scheme

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission asked a New York federal judge to approve a settlement reached with a Montana investor recently sentenced for his role in a scheme led by serial fraudster Jason Galanis that defrauded pension funds and a Native American tribe.

  • October 10, 2019

    Atty-Duping Scammer Gets 22 Years In $396M Ponzi Scheme

    A Maryland man who pled guilty to scamming investors including lawyers, bankers, investment advisers and professional athletes in a $396 million scheme offering high returns on consumer debt was sentenced Thursday to 22 years in federal prison and to pay at least $190 million in restitution.

  • October 10, 2019

    Bottle Co. Manager Dodges Prison For Recycling Scam

    A New York federal judge on Thursday declined to send a bottle collection company manager to prison for what prosecutors say was a $1.5 million scheme to overbill for the empty beverage containers the company delivered back to Pepsi and Canada Dry for recycling.

Expert Analysis

  • How Emotionally Intelligent AI Could Assist With E-Discovery

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    While artificial intelligence has already revolutionized the e-discovery field, the development of emotionally intelligent AI promises to explore data in an even more nuanced and human way, thereby further reducing the burden on legal teams, say Lisa Prowse and Brian Schrader at e-discovery services provider BIA.

  • FinCEN 'Travel Rule' Update Sets Challenges For Crypto Cos.

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    It is unclear how the virtual currency sector will find a practical way to comply with the recent expansion of the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network regulation known as the travel rule, but any solution is likely to have both unintended consequences and unintended benefits, say attorneys with King & Spalding.

  • Sports Gambling Compliance: Big Money Worth The Wager

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    As America teeters on the edge of a sports betting revolution, both prudent betting operators and the banks they use should roll out tailored compliance programs that effectively manage reputational, regulatory and business risks to avoid civil or criminal penalties, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • Preventable Risks Your Law Firm May Be Overlooking

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    Although most lawyers are well-prepared to defend or justify the value of an insurance claim for clients, often law firms have not clearly identified their own potential liabilities, planned for adequate insurance or established prudent internal risk management practices, says Victor Sordillo at Sompo International.

  • 6 Ethics Tips For Attorneys Making Lateral Transfers

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    With lateral transfers between law firms on the rise, it is more important than ever for partners to understand the steps they must take to adhere to ethics rules and other requirements when making a transition, say attorneys at Harris Wiltshire.

  • Giuliani Faces 4 Privilege Hurdles In Ukraine Call Probe

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    Assuming Rudy Giuliani intends to continue his assertion of attorney-client privilege in response to a House intelligence committee's subpoena concerning communications with Ukrainian officials on behalf of President Donald Trump, he has a difficult road ahead, says Tyler Maulsby at Frankfurt Kurnit.

  • DOJ's Qui Tam Approach Seems To Be Shifting

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    In the past, when a whistleblower brought a complaint to the government, it was considered significant if the U.S. Department of Justice declined to intervene. In this short video, David Tolley and BJ Trach of Latham discuss how things have changed in recent years.

  • Opinion

    President’s Private Business Interests Are Not Above The Law

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    President Donald Trump's New York federal court case against the Manhattan district attorney's subpoena of the president's tax returns insists that his private businesses and business associates are immune from state criminal investigation, but this immunity does not appear in the Constitution or any statute or treaty, say Arthur Middlemiss and Marc Scholl at Lewis Baach.

  • What To Look For In White Collar Cases This High Court Term

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    Several upcoming U.S. Supreme Court decisions — involving such varied issues as criminal procedure, statutory interpretation and public corruption — may see traditional liberal-conservative fault lines fall by the wayside and may have a notable impact on white collar criminal defense practice, say Harry Sandick and Jacob Newman of Patterson Belknap.

  • Consider The Power Of Tactical Empathy

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    By employing tactical empathy techniques to understand the interests behind the positions taken by others, attorneys can gain the upper hand in deal negotiations and litigation while still promoting and preserving long-term relationships with opponents, judges and others, say Shermin Kruse of TEDxYouth@Wrigleyville and Ursula Taylor of Strategic Health.

  • The Problem — And Opportunity — Of Implicit Bias In The Bar

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    Law firms are beginning to recognize implicit bias as a problem. But too few recognize that it is also an opportunity to broaden our thinking and become better legal problem solvers, says Daniel Karon of Karon LLC.

  • Series

    Judging A Book: Thapar Reviews Gorsuch's 'A Republic'

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    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's new book "A Republic, If You Can Keep It" offers hope for our constitutional system through stories of American greatness, and sheds much-needed light on originalism for skeptics, says Sixth Circuit Judge Amul Thapar.

  • 2 Trends In DOJ Health Care Enforcement

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    As the health care industry continues to evolve, so do the government's enforcement priorities. In this brief video, David Tolley and BJ Trach of Latham discuss two key areas of focus for the U.S. Department of Justice: the opioid crisis, and patient support and assistance programs.

  • Opinion

    True Wellness Requires A Deeper Look At Atty Profession

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    While I applaud all of the law firms that have signed the American Bar Association's campaign to improve attorney well-being, to achieve a truly holistic solution we must ask difficult questions about what we do, how we do it and the expectations we have set for ourselves and our clients, says Edward Shapiro at Much Shelist.

  • DOJ's New FARA Enforcement Focus Could Be Far-Reaching

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    In light of the U.S. Department of Justice's recent dramatic increase in criminal enforcement of the Foreign Agents Registration Act, a wide array of individuals and organizations whose conduct may be implicated by FARA should keep in mind several key compliance considerations, say Richard Beizer and Dalal Hasan of Crowell & Moring.